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Barefoot Leadership
Models of transformational, authentic and collaborative leadership
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Rejection Breeds Creativity & Innovation

Rejection Breeds Creativity & Innovation | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
New research from Johns Hopkins University suggests that having our ideas rejected tends to boost our creativity output.  Sharon Kim and her colleagues found that when most of us experience rejection, it can actually enhance our creativity, depending...
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Interesting .... rejection brings unexpected benefits.

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David Hain's curator insight, February 1, 2013 6:26 AM

Making good out of bad - powerful motivation for those with resilience...

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What do Science and Play have in common

What do Science and Play have in common | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it

Think Jar Collective...

 

Neuroscientist and artist Beau Lotto explores the challenge we have with perceiving new information in a fresh way. Lotto does a great job of explaining how it is important to embrace uncertainty and in particular “play”, as a tool to see in new ways and to think differently. In a nutshell he advises that if we want to be creative and innovative then we have to do things that shake us out of old patterns of how we perceive the world.


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Rescooped by Professor Jill Jameson from Web 2.0 for juandoming
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Social Media Video 2013: Social Media Revolution 4 (Video)

Social Media Video 2013: Social Media Revolution 4 (Video) | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
Social Media Video 2013: Social Media Revolution 4 was written by international best selling author and keynote speaker Erik Qualman. It’s part of a series of social media videos that are the...

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Innovation Excellence | Yes, but what about leadership?

Innovation Excellence | Yes, but what about leadership? | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it

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Episode 79: Models of Effective Leadership – Joan of Arc, Alexander the Great and Ginger the Chicken? | The Psych Files Podcast

Episode 79: Models of Effective Leadership – Joan of Arc, Alexander the Great and Ginger the Chicken? | The Psych Files Podcast | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it

"What makes for an effective leader and how can you improve your leadership skills? Well, who's the best role model for a leader? How about a chicken?" - with thanks to Michael Britt.

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Making the Choice Between Money and Meaning

Making the Choice Between Money and Meaning | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
Reducing the friction between work that has meaning and work that pays well.
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Rescooped by Professor Jill Jameson from My Interesting Stuff
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John Cleese on Creativity

Posted on Mar. 23, 2012 by Webster University Vienna

 

There is no obvious additional information about this 36-minute video of a lecture by Cleese on Cretivity. It looks to be about 20 years old, judging by Cleese's appearance. He speaks quite eruditely, and humorously (what else?), about a topic that is clearly of great interest to him. His range of knowledge is quite extraordinary. Well worth a look. -JL

 

Via #creativity Daily


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Joanne Chaney's curator insight, January 15, 2013 7:57 PM

Including and encouraging creativity

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The 8 Steps to Authentic Leadership - Forbes

The 8 Steps to Authentic Leadership - Forbes | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
"Sooner or later every leader realizes that 99% of the people he depends on for success don’t report to him.
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Why the Happiest States Have the Highest Suicide Rates | Healthland | TIME.com

Why the Happiest States Have the Highest Suicide Rates | Healthland | TIME.com | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
Worldwide surveys have consistently ranked the Scandinavian countries — with their generous family-leave policies, low crime, free health care, rich economies and, yes, high income taxes — as the happiest places on earth.

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tasaha's comment, September 22, 2012 12:51 AM
This first part of the article highlights that the degree of happiness a state or country has contradicts the suicide rate. This may be in part that those who are committing suicide are unable to meet the demands and expectations necessary for happiness in that given region. The llatter part of this article ties in nicely with health psychology and a recent article I read on how the individuals health is dependent, in part, on socioeconomical status (rank).
Justice_321's comment, September 24, 2012 2:13 AM
Where life is slower, people may have less to occupy their time; a situation that would normally spark negative emotions (e.g. argument with family member, stealing, etc.), may have a more severe and dramatic impact on these individuals. The correlation between socioeconomic status makes sense. If one does not have a meaningful place in the world, they may wonder as to what their purpose is.
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Stop Thinking So Much

Stop Thinking So Much | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it

Having such really big brains sometimes tricks us into thinking we should be thinking about everything we do. This extends to the idea of controlling everything we do too. But control in a real micro-managing style. The potential downside of this is revealed when we think about things too much. Or even just try too hard.


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Leadership Through the Ages

Leadership Through the Ages | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it

An infographic designed to assist in leadership development courses by helping participants to increase their awareness of leaders and leadership theory.

 

Read (view) more:

http://visual.ly/leadership-through-ages

 


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Rescooped by Professor Jill Jameson from Web 2.0 for juandoming
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10 Rules for Students, Teachers, and Life by John Cage and Sister Corita Kent

10 Rules for Students, Teachers, and Life by John Cage and Sister Corita Kent | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
"Nothing is a mistake.There's no win and no fail, there's only make." Buried in various corners of the web is a beautiful and poignant l...

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Rescooped by Professor Jill Jameson from Enhancing Creativity, Creative Thinking and Innovation
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» Creativity and Chaos - The Creative Mind

» Creativity and Chaos - The Creative Mind | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it

Creative thinking involves dual and often opposing qualities such as convergence & divergence, control & abandon, order & disorder, certainty & uncertainty.


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Twitter for Educators guide

PDF Guide Via k3hamilton, João Greno Brogueira, juandoming


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Lynnette Van Dyke's comment, November 23, 2012 9:21 AM
Awesome!!!
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8 Things Collaborative Leaders Know

8 Things Collaborative Leaders Know | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
Collaboration is not an option. Driven by the economic crisis and supported by the opportunities of Web 2.0, collaborative leaders know the future is in networked communities.
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Wendi Pillars's curator insight, January 31, 2013 12:09 PM

Great considerations for collaboration and networking. How do you reach that untapped potential?

 

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Think Before You Criticize

Think Before You Criticize | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it

Criticism can have a huge and sometimes crushing impact on people. Too often, in our anger and displeasure, we lash out and tell people what we think of their performance or judgment. Whatever the situation, think carefully before you choose your words.


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Hope Is a Strategy (Well, Sort Of)

Hope Is a Strategy (Well, Sort Of) | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
Optimism is vital for success. So don't roll your eyes; do something about it.
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Leaders in search of followership | Mannaz.com | Transformational Leadership

Leaders in search of followership | Mannaz.com | Transformational Leadership | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
In a conversation with Barbara Kellerman journalist Kenneth Mikkelsen explores why leadership is so hard to exercise today. This is a must read for everone interested in leadership and management trends.
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Leadership Is a Walk in the Dark - Huffington Post

Leadership Is a Walk in the Dark - Huffington Post | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it

"Leadership Is a Walk in the Dark" - Huffington Post Michael Harvey is an associate professor and chair of the Department of Business Management at Washington College. His work and research focuses on how leaders communicate.

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Why a Software Can Never Manage a Company | Thinkovate – from Intelligent Management

Why a Software Can Never Manage a Company | Thinkovate – from Intelligent Management | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
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Gut Instinct: A New Image Of Human Nature

Gut Instinct: A New Image Of Human Nature | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it

Join us exploring a new Gut Psychology in the recent book "What's Behind Your Belly Button? A Psychological Perspective of the Intelligence of Human Nature and Gut Instinct". This book is for anyone looking for a hopeful view of humankind and a method for getting in touch with your gut instincts to reduce stress, cope with fear and anxiety, deal with health issues and make efforts to stay healthy, and to increase optimal problem-solving and life-decision making abilities. See http://careerstorefront.angelfire.com


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Women are the primary education financers for their families

Women are the primary education financers for their families | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it
'Educate a girl, and you educate a village,' an African proverb goes, illustrating the ripple effect of educating women and the role that women play in making a difference in the lives of those around them.
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Does Wisdom Bring Happiness (or Vice Versa)?:Robert Wright

Does Wisdom Bring Happiness (or Vice Versa)?:Robert Wright | Barefoot Leadership | Scoop.it

"The happiness of your life depends on the quality of your thoughts," said Marcus Aurelius. If he's right, the path to well-being is straightforward: Avoid low-quality thoughts!

 

Sadly, it's far from clear that he's right. Decades of research into the relationship between reasoning ability and well-being have failed to find a clear link. But now comes a ray of hope for high-quality thinkers--a study suggesting that Marcus Aurelius is right so long as you define "quality of thought" carefully. And the study comes with a good pedigree--it will be published in the prestigious Journal of Experimental Psychology and features the eminent psychologist Richard Nisbett among its co-authors.

 

What's correlated with well-being, say Nisbett, Igor Grossman, and three other authors, isn't reasoning ability in the abstract but rather "wise reasoning"--reasoning that is "pragmatic," helping us "navigate important challenges in social life."

 

So, for starters, how did the researchers measure wise reasoning? Subjects in this study read a series of accounts of social conflicts and Dear-Abby-like dilemmas and then, in oral interviews, were invited to discuss how the stories might unfold in the future. Their responses were rated along such dimensions as "considering the perspectives of people involved in the conflict," "recognizing uncertainty and the limits of knowledge," and "recognizing the importance of ... compromise between opposing viewpoints." These ratings were the basis for a "wise reasoning" score.

 

For each of the subjects a second score was calculated that was intended to measure well-being. Its components included reported satisfaction with their lives and with their social relationships and a tendency toward positive expression.

 

It turned out that the two scores were correlated: the wiser people were, the higher their well-being.

 

Three interesting wrinkles:

[1] The older you get, the stronger the correlation. Wise young adults didn't exhibit much higher well-being than unwise young adults, but wise senior citizens had considerably higher well-being than their unwise peers. (Compare the slopes of the lines in the graph above.) So if you're young, cultivating wisdom is mainly a long-term investment. (That's probably a weak sales pitch for wisdom, since young people aren't known for thinking long term. I'm tempted to say they lack the wisdom to seek wisdom, but that would mean departing from this study's definition of wisdom, so never mind.)

 

[2] A second age-related issue: Well-being increases with age, and so does wise reasoning. Is it possible that getting older increases well-being and wisdom independently--that the wisdom itself has no effect on well-being? After all, gray hair increases with age and so does joint stiffness, but gray hair doesn't cause joint stiffness.

Through a statistical technique that I don't claim to grasp, the authors conclude that the answer is mixed. Part of the increase in well-being associated with age is caused by growing wisdom, but part of the increase happens for some other reason. That is, wisdom, is a "partially mediating" variable between age and well-being.

 

[3] Another causality question: Leaving aside the age issue, how should we interpret the general correlation between wise reasoning and well-being? Assuming a causal link between these two variables, does the wisdom lead to the well-being or does the well-being lead to the wisdom?

 

The latter is certainly plausible. When I'm in a good mood, it's easier to consider the perspectives of other people, and easier to focus on compromise--two components of wisdom as defined here. And presumably if I were in a good mood more often--if I had an enduringly high sense of well-being--my ability to thus exercise wisdom would remain pretty high.

 

The authors consider this question and offer grounds for doubting that it's the well-being that causes the wisdom, but they concede that the issue isn't completely settled.

 

I'm guessing the answer is a little of both: Wisdom leads to well-being, and well-being paves the way for wisdom--and, in particular, for wise action, not just a capacity for wise reasoning.

 

If that's true, then you can imagine getting swept up in a virtuous circle: Acting wisely reduces conflict in your life and strengthens your social relationships, and this fosters a sense of well-being that makes it easier to act wisely, and so on. But there's also the vicious circle scenario--a downward spiral featuring growing unhappiness, commensurately unwise action, deeper unhappiness, and so on.

 

The virtuous circle scenario is certainly more appealing. And it sounds like it wouldn't be that hard. But I'm old enough to know better.

 

 


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