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Educational resources by teachers for teachers.  Recursos educacionais por professores para professores.  
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Vancouver plans to go 100% renewable. I asked the city’s manager about the challenges it faces | David Roberts | Vox.com

Vancouver plans to go 100% renewable. I asked the city’s manager about the challenges it faces | David Roberts | Vox.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

Last year, Vancouver, British Columbia, officially adopted the goal of powering itself entirely with clean energy by 2050.

That’s a bigger deal than it might sound. Plenty of North American cities have committed to getting all their electricity from clean sources within a few decades. But when it comes to decarbonization, electricity is the easy part. (Okay, maybe not easy, but easier.)

Vancouver has resolved to get all its energy, not just electricity, from renewable sources.

The city’s electricity is already 98 percent carbon-free anyway. It comes from hydroelectric dams, via the province’s primary utility, BC Hydro. So the big problems over the next 35 years will be eliminating natural gas for heating and gasoline for transportation, two of the thorniest decarbonization challenges.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Frenar el cambio climático con un impuesto sobre la carne

Frenar el cambio climático con un impuesto sobre la carne | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Frenar el cambio climático con un impuesto sobre la carne http://laoropendolasostenible.blogspot.com/2016/07/frenar-el-cambio-climatico-con-un.html

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Space Debris 1957 2015

Almost 20,000 pieces of space debris are currently orbiting the Earth. This visualisation, created by Dr Stuart Grey, lecturer at University College Londo
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At Least 18 Dead After Severe Flooding in Central Europe | Alex Kirby | EcoWatch.com

At Least 18 Dead After Severe Flooding in Central Europe | Alex Kirby | EcoWatch.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

At least 18 people have lost their lives in central Europe as severe floods engulf the continent from France to Ukraine. In Paris the River Seine reached 6.1 metres (20 feet) above normal, and tens of thousands of people have fled their homes.

The river Seine in Paris has finally peaked, as storms play havoc right across Europe. @benlewismedia reports. https://t.co/xI3T4zhLWa

— 7 News Melbourne (@7NewsMelbourne) June 5, 2016

If the downpours and swollen rivers came as a surprise, they shouldn’t have done. Not only are there historical precedents for disastrous floods. There have been graphic recent warnings too, spelling out the growing likelihood that the warming climate will make bouts of flooding and other extreme weather more frequent.

Last March a study reported in the journal Nature said climate change was already driving an increase in extremes of rainfall and snowfall across most of the globe, even in arid regions. The study said the trend would continue as the world warmed.

The role of global warming in unusually large rainfall events in countries from the United Kingdom to China has been hotly debated. But this latest study showed that climate change is driving an overall increase in rainfall extremes.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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A New Origin Story for Dogs

A New Origin Story for Dogs | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Tens of thousands of years ago, before the internet, before the Industrial Revolution, before literature and mathematics, bronze and iron, before the advent of agriculture, early humans formed an unlikely partnership with another animal—the grey wolf. The fates of our two species became braided together. The wolves changed in body and temperament. Their skulls, teeth, and paws shrank. Their ears flopped. They gained a docile disposition, becoming both less frightening and less fearful. They learned to read the complex expressions that ripple across human faces. They turned into dogs.

Today, dogs are such familiar parts of our lives—our reputed best friends and subject of many a meme—that it’s easy to take them, and what they represent, for granted. Dogs were the first domesticated animals, and their barks heralded the Anthropocene. We raised puppies well before we raised kittens or chickens; before we herded cows, goats, pigs, and sheep; before we planted rice, wheat, barley, and corn; before we remade the world.

“Remove domestication from the human species, and there’s probably a couple of million of us on the planet, max,” says archaeologist and geneticist Greger Larson. “Instead, what do we have? Seven billion people, climate change, travel, innovation and everything. Domestication has influenced the entire earth. And dogs were the first.” For most of human history, “we’re not dissimilar to any other wild primate. We’re manipulating our environments, but not on a scale bigger than, say, a herd of African elephants. And then, we go into partnership with this group of wolves. They altered our relationship with the natural world.”

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We Can Now Turn Ocean Waves into Electricity and Fresh Water

We Can Now Turn Ocean Waves into Electricity and Fresh Water | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
An energy company is on the brink of revolutionizing the green power movement.

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Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, May 31, 12:13 AM
We're going to need this technology as climate change alters land masses and, in turn, human societies.  The need for fresh water is apparent from Southern California to the bone-dry Middle East.  Deserts are growing swiftly--we don't have much time to find solutions.
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Cómo el cambio climático está afectando al movimiento de la Tierra

Cómo el cambio climático está afectando al movimiento de la Tierra | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Un estudio de la NASA ha comprobado que el cambio climático está afectando al movimiento de la Tierra, debido al deshielo en los polos.

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Here’s How to Solve World Hunger

Here’s How to Solve World Hunger | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste. That’s enough to feed two billion people.

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What the Earth will be like in 10,000 years, according to scientists | Chris Mooney | WashPost.com

What the Earth will be like in 10,000 years, according to scientists | Chris Mooney | WashPost.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

A large group of climate scientists has made a bracing statement in the journal Nature Climate Change, arguing that we are mistaken if we think global warming is only a matter of the next 100 years or so — in fact, they say, we are locking in changes that will play out over as many as 10,000 years.

“The next few decades offer a brief window of opportunity to minimize large-scale and potentially catastrophic climate change that will extend longer than the entire history of human civilization thus far,” write the 22 climate researchers, led by Peter Clark, from Oregon State University.

The author names include not only a number of very influential climate scientists in general but several key leaders behind major reports from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, including MIT’s Susan Solomon and Thomas Stocker of the University of Bern in Switzerland.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Stephane Bilodeau's curator insight, February 14, 11:03 AM

“In hundreds of years from now, people will look back and say, ‘Yeah, the sea level is rising; it will continue to rise; we live with a constant rise of sea level because of these people 200 years ago that used coal, and oil and gas,’ ” said Anders Levermann, a sea-level-rise expert at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research and one of the paper’s authors. “If you just look at this, it’s stunning that we can make such a long-lasting impact that has the same magnitude as the ice ages.”

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, February 14, 5:02 PM

It looks like we need to develop new technologies to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. Let's get to work, governments will be waiting in line to be your client .... hopefully.

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Scientists warn almost all seabirds will ingest plastic by 2050

Scientists warn almost all seabirds will ingest plastic by 2050 | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Scientists warn 99 per cent of the world's seabirds species will be ingesting plastic by 2050 if current marine pollution trends continue.

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On the Brink of a World Without Large Predators

On the Brink of a World Without Large Predators | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Scientists looked at 31 predator species and found 75 percent of them are in decline—including leopards, cheetahs, polar bears, tigers, giant otters, and multiple wolf species.

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The world is quickly running out of water, new NASA study says | Gabriel Fisher | Quartz.com

The world is quickly running out of water, new NASA study says | Gabriel Fisher | Quartz.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

The world is losing groundwater, fast.

That is the conclusion of a new study published by researchers at NASA, which drew on satellite data to quantify the stresses on aquifers. The researchers found that over the decade-long study of the 37 major aquifers worldwide, 21 experienced a depletion of their water supply. Especially alarming was the study’s finding that the Indus Basin aquifer, which supplies much of India’s water supply, has depleted rapidly.

“The potential consequences are pretty scary,” NASA scientist Matthew Roddell, a lead author of the study, tells Quartz. “At some point those aquifers might run dry.”

To measure the water level changes, the researchers studied the gravitational orbit of NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite caused by the shifting of earth’s mass. Because water is one of the larger and constantly shifting masses on earth, this allowed them to measure changes to groundwater supplies.

The researchers found that California’s Central Valley aquifer was the most depleted of all aquifers in the US, because Californians have relied more heavily on drawing groundwater as rain water has dissipated during California’s long drought.

While the study detected the change in groundwater levels, it could not quantify the amount of water remaining in the aquifers. Rodell said this would require drilling into the aquifers themselves, which he supports doing. “We should be monitoring and quantifying how much water is in these aquifers like we do with oil,” he says.

Preserving water in aquifers is especially problematic in agricultural areas like India, which relies heavily on water-intensive rice farming. According to Rodell, over 68% of our water supply is used for agriculture. But unlike, say, water used to cool a power plant, water used in agriculture is not recyclable, Rodell explains. “The people who are using the water don’t necessarily recognize that it will ever run out. It is used as a resource that will last forever,” Rodell says. If we continue with our current consumption practices, hesays,”these people and those farmers that rely on that water won’t have it anymore.”

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped

Half the World Lives on 1% of Its Land, Mapped | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

"Data viz extraordinaire Max Galka created this map using NASA’s gridded population data, which counts the global population within each nine-square-mile patch of Earth, instead of within each each district, state, or country border. Out of the 28 million total cells, the ones with a population over 8,000 are colored in yellow."

 

Tags: population, density, mapping, visualization.


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Brian Weekley's curator insight, July 27, 10:47 AM
Great simple map of world population.  Scroll down and look at the U.S.  It reflects the global trend.  This also has political implications, as evidenced by voting patterns in the 2012 presidential election.  Elections are dependent upon votes, which come from people, which are primarily clustered in cities.  Election campaigns would use this data to plan their schedules as to where to focus their campaigning efforts.  For the folks in Wyoming, they rarely see candidates other than during the primaries.  And these world populationclusters have been relatively consistent historically, particularly in south and east Asia.  Northern India has serious carrying capacity challenges. Notice the clusters along the Nile- evidence of arable land.
Francisco Restivo's curator insight, August 8, 5:49 PM
Fantastic visualization!
David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 8, 5:55 PM

Geeky-cool stuff! Thanks to Jim Lerman.

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2016: El año de los récords climáticos

2016: El año de los récords climáticos | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

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«No botes basura»: cómo las campañas sociales pierden utilizando el «no» — M en español — Medium

«No botes basura»: cómo las campañas sociales pierden utilizando el «no» — M en español — Medium | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Hace algunos días estaba caminando por la ciudad y vi un letrero que decía «Por favor, no botes basura. Todos los años se botan toneladas…

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10 Images That Show The Effect Humans Are Having on the Planet

10 Images That Show The Effect Humans Are Having on the Planet | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
From garbage in our oceans to garbage in outer space, here are 10 images that show the effect humans are having on the world, and ourselves.

Via Laura Brown
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Coral bleaching spreads to Maldives, devastating spectacular reefs

Coral bleaching spreads to Maldives, devastating spectacular reefs | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Exclusive: Images from the Indian Ocean archipelago reveal the extent of the longest global coral bleaching event in history • Coral bleaching in the Maldives – in pictures The longest global coral bleaching event in history is now devastating reefs in the crystal clear waters of the Maldives, with images released exclusively to the Guardian powerfully illustrating the extent of the damage there. Photographed by the XL Catlin Seaview Survey, the images captured the event in May as it moved beyond the now devastated Great Barrier Reef and into waters further west. Continue reading...
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Human impact has pushed Earth into the Anthropocene, scientists say

Human impact has pushed Earth into the Anthropocene, scientists say | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
New study provides one of the strongest cases yet that the planet has entered a new geological epoch

 

Tags: Anthropocene, development,  land use, environment, environment modify.  


Via Seth Dixon, Yves Carmeille "Libre passeur", Stephania Savva
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Sally Egan's curator insight, February 21, 4:30 PM

Good discussion for syllabus dotpoint Human impacts on ecosystems within the HSC topic Ecosystems at Risk.

Andrea J Galan's curator insight, February 22, 6:58 PM

I chose to add this article into my folder because it talks about earth entering a new geological epoch. This is exciting yet scary news because it's mostly pollution that justifies /proves the new epoch. The news is exciting because it's something that we are currently experiencing. The evidence that proves the geological epoch on the other hand is terrifying. It just goes to show how awful we have been treating our planet like if the next generation is going to be finding fossils in plastic bags that is a problem.

nukem777's curator insight, June 2, 7:21 AM
Thought we were still officially in the Holocene...did I miss a memo?
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Climate change: website reveals which homes will be swamped by rising sea levels

Climate change: website reveals which homes will be swamped by rising sea levels | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Coastal Risk Australia combines Google Maps with detailed tide and elevation data, as well as future sea level rise projections

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The Panama Papers Show That There's Enough Money to Solve the World's Problems - It's Just in the Wrong Hands

The Panama Papers Show That There's Enough Money to Solve the World's Problems - It's Just in the Wrong Hands | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
The money we desperately need to fix the world's growing problems is there, but we have an economic and political system that ensures it stays in the wrong hands, for a reason no more noble than greed. A better world is possible, but only by challenging the dominance and privilege of the rich.

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The Eight Major Cities That Are Running Out Of Water Faster Than You Can Imagine [IMAGES]

The Eight Major Cities That Are Running Out Of Water Faster Than You Can Imagine [IMAGES] | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
In March of this year, we reported that it has been predicted that more than 2.9 billion people will be without water over the next 10 years. This was according to the latest United Nations report on water which stated that people in some 48 countries across …

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3 Communities Transition Away From Fossil Fuels to Run on 100% Renewables | Cole Mellino | EcoWatch.com

3 Communities Transition Away From Fossil Fuels to Run on 100% Renewables | Cole Mellino | EcoWatch.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

Communities around the world aren’t waiting for global leaders to take action on climate change. They’re taking action now.

This episode of In the World, an original series by Fusion, highlights three communities that have already transitioned away from fossil fuels to run completely on renewables.

One of communities featured, Burlington, Vermont, was featured on EcoWatch earlier this year when it became the first U.S. city of any decent size to run on renewable electricity. The other two communities—Dardesheim, Germany and Dharnai, India—provide exciting models for other cities and towns around the world that are beginning to make the transition to clean energy.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Walking fish on brink of extinction, measures considered | GrindTV.com

Walking fish on brink of extinction, measures considered | GrindTV.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
A recent survey of the little walking fish called a handfish showed that its population has been reduced to 79 fish, according to Australian scientists.

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We need to grow 50% more food yet agriculture causes climate change. How do we get out of this bind? | Mark Cackler | The Guardian

We need to grow 50% more food yet agriculture causes climate change. How do we get out of this bind? | Mark Cackler | The Guardian | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

We are trapped in a vicious cycle: we will need to grow 50% more food by 2050 to feed 9 billion people but agriculture, which is paradoxically vulnerable to climate change, generates 25% of heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions that lead to climate change. The more we grow using conventional methods, the more we exacerbate the problem. It’s time for a climate-smart agriculture but first we must address a few man-made problems.

First, there is a frustrating lack of attention paid to agriculture in the current global climate talks leading up to the Paris conference later this year. By definition, food production affects all countries, rich and poor, and it is hard to imagine any effective post-Kyoto climate change agreement that ignores 25% of the problem. So, we need a climate change agreement where agriculture is a big part of the solution, and delivers a triple win: higher agricultural productivity to feed more people and raise the incomes of poor farmers - especially women, greater climate resilience, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

Second, we still grow our food largely using 20th century technology - over 100 years old in the case of fertilizer production! We need more and better agricultural research to bring farming into the 21st century. Other sectors like energy have made great breakthroughs in remarkably short periods of time, but where is the “electric car” for agriculture? The Copenhagen Consensus concludes that agricultural research is one of the single most effective investments we could make to fight malnourishment. Therefore, we need more support for bodies like the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research that focus on crops and cropping systems that are of greatest importance to poor farmers and poor countries. Such research is a global public good that the private sector cannot be expected to deliver alone.

Third, agriculture, like other sectors, ‘wastes’ carbon because we don’t price it properly. Carbon pricing is an essential way to cut greenhouse gas emissions and lower climate risks. Whether through carbon markets, carbon taxes, or performance measures, a price on carbon can drive investment toward a greener agriculture, a cleaner economy and ultimately, more food for all.

Fourth, agriculture today consumes 70% of the world’s fresh water, and too much of it is wasted. We must become wiser about water, especially because of climate change. One example of better water management is in rice cultivation. Growing rice can use enormous quantities of water, but new farming techniques, like those developed by the CGIAR, can drastically reduce water use and also reduce the amount of methane from rice cultivation.

Hunger has many causes, including ignorance and injustice and violence, and there is no single solution that will guarantee that every person, every day, everywhere, has enough to eat. But, as incredulous as it sounds, even though one in nine people go hungry today, it is within our power to eliminate extreme poverty and hunger by 2030. We can build a better food system, based on climate smart agriculture that will grow more food, raise farmer incomes, and protect our land, water and biodiversity. And we can eliminate world hunger.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Lemenorel Edouard's curator insight, December 18, 2015 7:47 AM
Une solution en terme de cultures: plus de recherches et une gestion des ressources plus réfléchie.