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Educational resources by teachers for teachers.  Recursos educacionais por professores para professores.  
Curated by Luciana Viter
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"Smart city": qu'espérer de la ville de demain ?

"Smart city": qu'espérer de la ville de demain ? | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
La "ville intelligente" n'est plus un rêve futuriste, l'impact du numérique dans le développement urbain est désormais une réalité. Voici pourquoi.

 

La ville du futur ne relève plus de la science-fiction. Elle est désormais à portée de main. Cette ville  entièrement connectée - surnommée  "ville intelligente" ou smart city- proposera des services publics plus performants et durables dans les domaines de la santé, des infrastructures, des transports ou encore de l'énergie. Elle aura aussi un impact beaucoup plus important sur les citadins via le partage numérique de données. "Le numérique ne sera plus subi mais maîtrisé", explique l'architecte Rudy Ricciotti.

La smart city fait désormais partie des préoccupations des grands groupes informatiques, à l'image de Microsoft qui a consacré une partie de ses Tech Days (organisés début février à Paris) à cette thématique. 

 

Aux origines de la "ville intelligente"

(...)


Via malik berkati, juandoming
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What the World’s Cities Would Look Like If Every Glacier Melted

What the World’s Cities Would Look Like If Every Glacier Melted | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
A planner maps extreme sea level rise, turning Los Angeles, New York, London, and other cities into urban archipelagoes.

Via Dot MacKenzie
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California's drought is the worst in 1,200 years, evidence suggests

California's drought is the worst in 1,200 years, evidence suggests | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
As California finally experiences the arrival of a rain-bearing Pineapple Express this week, two climate scientists have shown that the drought of 2012-2014 has been the worst in 1,200 years.

 

Daniel Griffin, an assistant professor in the Department of Geography, Environment and Society at the University of Minnesota, and Kevin Anchukaitis, an assistant scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, asked the question, "How unusual is the ongoing California drought?" Watching the severity of the California drought intensify since last autumn, they wondered how it would eventually compare to other extreme droughts throughout the state's history.

 

To answer those questions, Griffin and Anchukaitis collected new tree-ring samples from blue oak trees in southern and central California. "California's old blue oaks are as close to nature's rain gauges as we get," says Griffin. "They thrive in some of California's driest environments." These trees are particularly sensitive to moisture changes and their tree rings display moisture fluctuations vividly.

 

As soon as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) released climate data for the summer of 2014, the two scientists sprang into action. Using their blue oak data, they reconstructed rainfall back to the 13th century. They also calculated the severity of the drought by combining NOAA's estimates of the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), an index of soil moisture variability, with the existing North American Drought Atlas, a spatial tree-ring based reconstruction of drought developed by scientists at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. These resources together provided complementary data on rainfall and soil moisture over the past millennium. Griffin and Anchukaitis found that while the current period of low precipitation is not unusual in California's history, these rainfall deficits combined with sustained record high temperatures created the current multiyear severe water shortages. "While it is precipitation that sets the rhythm of California drought, temperature weighs in on the pitch," says Anchukaitis.

 

"We were genuinely surprised at the result," says Griffin, a NOAA Climate & Global Change Fellow and former WHOI postdoctoral scholar. "This is California--drought happens. Time and again, the most common result in tree-ring studies is that drought episodes in the past were more extreme than those of more recent eras. This time, however, the result was different." While there is good evidence of past sustained, multi-decadal droughts or so-called "megadroughts"' in California, the authors say those past episodes were probably punctuated by occasional wet years, even if the cumulative effect over decades was one of overall drying. The current short-term drought appears to be worse than any previous span of consecutive years of drought without reprieve.

 

Tree rings are a valuable data source when tracking historical climate, weather and natural disaster trends. Floods, fires, drought and other elements that can affect growing conditions are reflected in the development of tree rings, and since each ring represents one year the samples collected from centuries-old trees are a virtual timeline that extend beyond the historical record in North America.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Roger D. Jones, PhD
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Brazil's ethanol revolution

"United Nations, June 2008 - The bio-fuel, ethanol, is generating a revolution in renewable energy that could help reduce the world's thirst for oil. In Brazil, the production of ethanol from sugarcane is booming, but what is not clear is the impact it is having on the industry's sugarcane cutters."  Transcript of video available here.


Via Seth Dixon
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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:38 PM

Brazil's ethanol revolution is showing how the country is using its agriculture to help out its economy, but with the increase in cane production comes the laying off of all the manual cutters. Essentially, the countries success in ethanol production is resulting in job loss for the workers that made the production of ethanol as popular as it.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:32 AM

This video highlights one of the negative impacts of globalization and economic development. As a country grows and become more economically powerful, the effects of success often outpaces the poorer classes of its society. Ethanol production has become an established and important part of Brazil's economy, and its success has begun to create negative social impacts. As the ethanol business continues to grow the more it relies on heavy machinery and other technology to maintain it, and the less the low-skilled manual laborers are needed. In order to avoid larger social problems, the government and ethanol companies in Brazil will need to find ways to integrate their already existing labor force into the expanding ethanol industry.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:04 PM

Brazil is one of the only countries in the world that is no longer dependent on oil. Increased sugarcane production has allowed for the large production of the bio-fuel ethanol, and now the country no longer really needs to export oil from other countries. This will allow Brazil to no longer be dependent on other countries or corporations for oil, and it could potentially lead to Brazil exporting ethanol and making a profit. 

 

On the other hand, many worry about how the switch from manual labor to mechanized production will affect the workers. Large lay offs could result in more people moving to the cities in order to find work, thus creating more slums. Luckily, the government is attempting to make jobs within the bustling bio-fuel business in order keep people employed.

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Lunch not landfill: how schools can cut food waste and save money

Lunch not landfill: how schools can cut food waste and save money | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Food waste costs schools and colleges around £250m per year. But smart thinking could reduce the rubbish and needless spending.
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Living in: The world’s healthiest cities

Living in: The world’s healthiest cities | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Five destinations across the globe that have excellent mass transit, ample green spaces and readily available healthcare.

Via David Mainwood / EFL SMARTblog
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66 actividades de medio ambiente para concientizar a los estudiantes

66 actividades de medio ambiente para concientizar a los estudiantes | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Tweet Actualmente, los profesores tratamos de concientizar a los estudiantes debido a los problemas medioambientales y este post incluye 66 actividades con las cuales los estudiantes pueden aprender mas de reciclaje, contaminación ambiental,...

Via Ramon Aragon
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5 Steps to a Greener School - Edutopia

5 Steps to a Greener School - Edutopia | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

"Ahhh, August -- the dog days of summer. Before the back-to-school frenzy. I hope that you, your family and students everywhere have enjoyed some unstructured time, some time outdoors, and some time getting your hands and feet dirty at the beach, the park, your backyard, or your front stoop or sidewalk. While you are -- hopefully -- in this relaxed state of mind, I want to plant a few ideas to change your perspective and practices as you head back to school this year. These are ideas for bringing the outdoors, healthy living and stewardship into your school and community."


Via John Evans
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adorwelding's comment, August 19, 2013 5:00 AM
Good suggestion
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Japón tiene más estaciones de carga que gasolineras

Japón tiene más estaciones de carga que gasolineras | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
40.000 unidades de carga para vehículos eléctricos tiene Japón superando la cifra de 34.000 gasolineras que hay en el país

Via Ramon Aragon
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Floating Toilets That Clean Themselves Grow On A Lake

Floating Toilets That Clean Themselves Grow On A Lake | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

A new project places little kayaks filled with aquatic plants under latrines in floating homes on Southeast Asia's largest freshwater lake. So how do the toilets clean the wastewater?


Via Neelima Sinha
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Neelima Sinha's curator insight, December 23, 2014 10:48 PM
Could be very useful in countries with population pressure
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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.

 

Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:30 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the time lapse of a lake in Sao Paulo in Brazil and shows how the water is running low.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows the maps as It is a GPS map and a GIS layering map. This a basic definable part of this unit because of its maps, scale, sense of place, identity, and overall relativity. This is a simple GIS layering map over the Jaguari resovoir.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 2014 4:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

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Carbon Control: What America’s New Climate Change Offensive Looks Like

Carbon Control: What America’s New Climate Change Offensive Looks Like | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
UPDATE: On June 23, the U.S. Supreme Court effectively upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's authority, under the Clean Air Act, to regulate carbon and

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 4, 2014 9:12 PM

If you are looking for a visual that looks at the new rules surrounding carbon emission and at what each state may have to do and how others are perceiving the new regulations you should check out this visual. You may scroll down the page (first click through to the site) or you can view it as a slideshow.

This visual would be great to share with students as it is designed as a cartoon (with many panels). It is easy to understand and describes where carbon emissions come from (in the US) as well as the impact this may have on countries outside the US.

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The Dutch solution to floods: live with water, don't fight it

The Dutch solution to floods: live with water, don't fight it | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
With more than half the country at or below sea level, the Dutch are experts on water management – and its people have had to make sacrifices

Via Dot MacKenzie
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Everything from Social Media to F1 to Photography to Anything Interesting
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What would the world look like if all the ice MELTED?

What would the world look like if all the ice MELTED? | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
National Geographic has created a series of interactive maps demonstrating the catastrophic effect Earth’s ice could cause if it melted and flowed into the oceans and seas.

Via Chiraag
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Your Climate Change Lifestyle Guide

What does climate change mean for your life, when it comes to food, shopping, socializing, travelling & more? (A construção de sociedades verdes começa c/ nossa forma de pensar.
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Teachers - teachers resources: teaching tips, free worksheets, lesson plans, more!

Teachersindex.com has teacher resources, teaching tips, free worksheets, lesson plans
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MAN

Animation created in Flash and After Effects looking at mans relationship with the natural world.

Music: In the Hall of the Mountain King by Edvard Grieg.


Via CM Elias
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Carmenne K. Thapliyal's curator insight, March 31, 2013 12:02 PM

A wonderful document (without words) for teaching man's relationship with the environment. Can be used in any foreign language class: 

- Lexicon around "environment" and the need and ways to preserve her various elements

- Get students to imagine a dialogue between the creatures and Man, between two creatures, between the Martians and Man.

- Project: in groups, students make a poster intended for Man about the importance of preserving the environment.

Mercedes RamírezRuiz's comment, April 14, 2013 9:59 AM
wow... :( Great document...