Banco de Aulas
Follow
Find
5.1K views | +4 today
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from As TIC e a educação do séc.XXI
onto Banco de Aulas
Scoop.it!

Parece Facebook, mas não é: são as redes educativas

Parece Facebook, mas não é: são as redes educativas | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Edmodo fournit un moyen sûr et facile pour votre classe de se connecter et de collaborer, de partager du contenu, et les accés aux devoirs, les notes et notifications des écoles.

Via Sandra V. Barbosa, Helena Felizardo, Teresa Vasconcelos
more...
Sandra V. Barbosa's comment, January 11, 2013 1:23 PM
Obrigada pelo rescoop, Maria José Vitorino.
Sandra V. Barbosa's comment, January 11, 2013 1:26 PM
Teresa Vasconcelos, grata pelo rescoop. Obrigada por divulgar esta rede educativa, importante para todos nós.
Maria Jose Vitorino's comment, January 12, 2013 1:33 PM
Também achei :)
Banco de Aulas
Educational resources by teachers for teachers.  Recursos educacionais por professores para professores.  
Curated by Luciana Viter
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from News for IELTS + Class Discussion
Scoop.it!

10 Rules for Students, Teachers, and Life

10 Rules for Students, Teachers, and Life | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
"Nothing is a mistake. There's no win and no fail, there's only make."

Buried in various corners of the web is a beautiful and poignant l

Via David Mainwood / EFL SMARTblog
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from News for IELTS + Class Discussion
Scoop.it!

Secret student: six things I'd never dare tell my teacher

Secret student: six things I'd never dare tell my teacher | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
'I would much prefer getting my work marked by a teacher than Joseph Smith who has been picking his nose for the last half an hour.' This week's Secret Student tell us what pupils really think about school

Via David Mainwood / EFL SMARTblog
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from 21st Century Literacy and Learning
Scoop.it!

How Tests Make Us Smarter

How Tests Make Us Smarter | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Low-stakes quizzing helps people retain more of what they learn.

Via Mel Riddile, Les Howard
more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 22, 8:21 AM

used properly, testing as part of an educational routine provides an important tool not just to measure learning, but to promote it."


Standardized testing is in some respects a quest for more rigor in public education. We can achieve rigor in a different way. We can instruct teachers on the use of low-stakes quizzing in class. We can teach students the benefits of retrieval practice and how to use it in their studying outside class. These steps cost little and cultivate habits of successful learning that will serve students throughout their lives.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Scoop.it!

10 Traits of an Encouraging Classroom

10 Traits of an Encouraging Classroom | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, Ivon Prefontaine
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 20, 5:32 PM

When we encourage students and create safe environments we enable their learning. We do not guarantee it, but there is a better chance learning will happen where good teaching happens.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
Scoop.it!

What an Effective Teacher's Classroom Looks Like | MiddleWeb

What an Effective Teacher's Classroom Looks Like | MiddleWeb | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Teaching experts Annette Breaux & Todd Whitaker contrast the characteristics of effective and ineffective classrooms with two simple but compelling bullet

 


Via Nicholas Fragkias, juandoming
more...
juandoming's curator insight, July 18, 2:16 AM

add your insight...

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Inovação Educacional
Scoop.it!

CETIC.br - TIC Educação 2013

O Centro de Estudos sobre as Tecnologias da Informação e da Comunicação - CETIC.br - é responsável pela produção de indicadores e estatísticas sobre a disponibilidade e uso da Internet no Brasil, divulgando análises e informações periódicas sobre o desenvolvimento da rede no país

Pesquisas TICPesquisa TIC EDUCAÇÃO 2013ProfessoresAlunosCoordenadores pedagógicosDiretoresEscolas
Via Luciano Sathler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Dance Of Human Evolution Was Herky-Jerky, Fossils Suggest | Christopher Joyce | NPR.org

Dance Of Human Evolution Was Herky-Jerky, Fossils Suggest | Christopher Joyce | NPR.org | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

A trio of anthropologists has decided it's time to rewrite the story of human evolution.

 

That narrative has always been a work in progress, because almost every time scientists dig up a new fossil bone or a stone tool, it adds a new twist to the story. Discoveries lead to new arguments over the details of how we became who we are.

 

But anthropologists generally agree on this much: A little more than 2 million years ago in Africa, the human lineage emerged. Smithsonian anthropologist says the conventional wisdom is that much of Africa changed about then from forest to dry savanna. Our ape-like ancestors had to adapt or die, leave the forest and embrace the savanna — and in doing so, they evolved into something more like us.

 

"The traditional package of traits," Potts explains, "including elongated legs, large brain, culture, a whole variety of traits, were thought to have come together with the origin of the genus Homo. We're saying no, that's not the case."

 

Potts is curator of human origins at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History. He and his collaborators, of New York University and of the Wenner-Gren Foundation, have analyzed fossils discovered over the last few decades. They say the human animal didn't come together quite as quickly and neatly as commonly thought.

 

"What's different," Aiello says of this new narrative, "is that the whole package that makes us human — long linear bodies, very large body size, delayed growth and development for the kids — didn't evolve at the same time."

 

Instead, these scientists say, traits that make us human arose separately, in a herky-jerky fashion.

 

Click headline to read more and listen to audio this NPR radio segment--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

A World of Project Ideas (You Can Steal)

A World of Project Ideas (You Can Steal) | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
To get off to a flying start planning this summer, borrow good project ideas from other teachers and adapt them to fit your context.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
Scoop.it!

How Finland Keeps Kids Focused Through Free Play

How Finland Keeps Kids Focused Through Free Play | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
An American teacher in Helsinki questions the national practice of giving 15 minute breaks each hour—until he sees the difference it makes in his classroom.

Via Suvi Salo, Timo Ilomäki, juandoming
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from iGeneration - 21st Century Education
Scoop.it!

Over 400,000 Lesson Plan Resources for Teachers

Over 400,000 Lesson Plan Resources for Teachers | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Transformational Teaching, Thinking, and Technology
Scoop.it!

25 Ways to Create A Sticky Lesson - InformED

25 Ways to Create A Sticky Lesson - InformED | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
How do we create learning that lasts? It's a hard question to answer, and in some cases an even harder reality to achieve, particularly with the pressure

Via Beth Dichter, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Chris Carter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 22, 7:01 PM

After describing the three phases of the learning process based on cognitive science. The first two phases:

* Students decide what to attend to.

* Students organize the information

These work with short term memory but to know the information students must also activate long term memory which may begin in class with a review but should also includes well crafted assignments.

What can you do?The post continues by exploring ways to capture a students attention and ways to help them create a framework. The final section explores how to make the lesson stick. Three examples are below (quoted from the post).

* Begin lectures with a high level question that the upcoming information can answer.

* Highlight the "unfinished" nature of each subject.

* Don't use too many types of different presentation materials at once.

Throughout the post there are links to additional resources.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, June 23, 10:38 AM

I love this image. It captures it all. Beth Dichter posts great stuff on a regular basis. I am really spending some serious time inviestigating this topic of buy-in by the students by givening them more ownership .

Ness Crouch's curator insight, June 25, 2:38 AM

I like the analogy of a 'sticky lesson'... something that sticks in your head. That's the aim of every lesson... get what you are teaching to stick in the learners head!

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Contenidos educativos digitales
Scoop.it!

5 repositorios de vídeos para utilizar en el aula o en casa

5 repositorios de vídeos para utilizar en el aula o en casa | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Cinco webs con repositorios de vídeos sobre diferentes temas (Matemáticas, Historia, Ciencias...) y que pueden utilizarse en el aula o en casa.

Via Paz Gonzalo, Silvan Pan Morel
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Educational News and Web Tools
Scoop.it!

Always a teacher: a reflection (& confession) on 5 years out of the classroom.

Always a teacher: a reflection (& confession) on 5 years out of the classroom. | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

I can’t believe it’s been 5 years since I wrote this post about the (hilarious?) adventures of my very first job interview in Manhattan as an instructional coach.


Via ICTPHMS
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Scoop.it!

How Homework Works In Finland (Hint: There Isn't Any) - Edudemic

How Homework Works In Finland (Hint: There Isn't Any) - Edudemic | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
When we talk about how our education system is failing our students, there are a lot of different options presented on how to ‘fix’ it. Everyone has an answer, a promising new way of thinking, a potential magic bullet. Inevitably, we also examine school systems that are working as a part of investigating what to do …

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Ivon Prefontaine
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 27, 7:25 PM

I rarely assigned homework. It seemed counter-productive and counter-intuitive. The exception, if can be called homework, were projects which engaged students and their parents at home. This provided an untapped resource, excited students and parents, and was highly successful. I always provided more time for these projects so they did not work against learning.

Mika Auramo's comment, July 27, 10:00 PM
Too much false information, including topic.
Debra Evans's curator insight, July 28, 2:54 PM

Good piece, but need to consider also; this country is not really catering to multi-cultural group.  But, we should learn from their examples - we in Australia definitely moving towards over-educating, with even prep losing its play-based approach.  Also worth noting - the teacher in the classroom has the biggest impact on whether or not the students will learn - effective teachers=effective learners.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from eflclassroom
Scoop.it!

New Teacher 101: Surviving your first year in the classroom

New Teacher 101: Surviving your first year in the classroom | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Post written by Jenna Kleine, a ClassDojo Thought Partner






Year one is exciting! However, enthusiasm can only get your so far. My advice? Be consistent. Whether you have a few weeks or a few days before school starts, it’s time to make some decisions that will allow you to establish a consistent classroom environment.


7 Questions to ask yourself when planning routines and procedures — and advice from a middle school science teacher…





1. How will students enter the classroom?


Always have students line up outside of class. This might sound elementary, but it allows for separation between hallway behavior and classroom behavior. As they enter greet each student and say their names! This might be the only “hello” they receive today.


2. How will I get students’ attention?


A bell, a countdown, or a clap is typical — try to change it up! Perhaps you can ask the students for ideas and have a competition for the best attention grabber. How about this… TD4Wbutton :)


3. How will I begin each day?


Students should be able to enter class and get started on whatever routine you have in place without any reminders. Always have the assignment up on the projector for students to see. I do a quick-write at the beginning of each class. Three minutes to write, one minute to share with their partner/group, then students are randomly called on to share with the class.


4. How will I be calling on students?


I love using ClassDojo’s randomize feature to call on students. This keeps the students who raise their hand too much at bay and the shy students participating. Teachers sometimes use popsicle sticks to call on students at random, but ClassDojo is much more engaging and interactive for the students.


5. How will I reward excellent behavior?


ClassDojo! Personalize positive behavior awards based on characteristics you want students to strive for. However, make sure you have an incentive program in place to keep students working for ClassDojo points. For example, the first 5 students to reach 20 points gets _________.


6. What is my discipline policy?


Most schools will have a discipline policy in place that you must follow in terms of detention, etc. For my own classroom I give a warning using ClassDojo. If the behavior continues after the warning, communicate with the parent. Send them a ClassDojo message! Or give an old-school phone call. Parent-teacher relationships are key for student success.


7. How will I end class every day?


Exit tickets! Put a prompt up on the projector and give each student/pair/group a piece of paper. Students must turn in “exit tickets” on their way out the door.


“Moment of Zen” (cred. Jon Stewart) — I end each class with an inspirational quote. I turn off all of the lights and put the quote up on the projector. Students must be silent for 20 seconds before they can leave. Namaste. :)





Whatever routines and procedures you put in place, stay consistent. Your stress-level will thank you for it.


Good luck!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Yashy Tohsaku, Juergen Wagner
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Parents: 10 Ways to Help Your Children with Research Projects

Parents: 10 Ways to Help Your Children with Research Projects | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
INFOhio - Ohio's PreK-12 Digital Library

Via INFOhio Curriculum Toolbox, Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
INFOhio Curriculum Toolbox's curator insight, July 21, 10:36 AM

Help parents help their children with research (without actually doing it for them) by giving them a copy of this flyer with tips for working research skills into everyday activities. Note: This flyer is one of several on the page. You may need to scroll down to see it and download it.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Educommunication
Scoop.it!

5 Maneras de escuchar a tus alumnos. La importancia de la escucha empática

5 Maneras de escuchar a tus alumnos. La importancia de la escucha empática | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

"Cada vez estoy más convencido de que uno de los grandes defectos de muchos docentes es que no saben escuchar o, si escuchan, no tienen una intención declarada de comprender, sino de contestar. ¿Verdad que has tenido la sensación muchas veces de hablar con un compañero y saber que lo que realmente quiere no es escucharte a ti, sino que acabes de hablar para contestarte y explicarte algo suyo?"


Via Manuel Pinto
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

Six Reasons to Laugh in Class - Education Rethink

Six Reasons to Laugh in Class - Education Rethink | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

"I don't use sarcasm and I don't resort to ad hominem attacks in the name of "humor." However, I joke around often in class. It might be a wise crack about pop culture, a musing on something ironic or the fun of wordplay. These uses of humor are intentional. I believe humor is a good thing in the classroom. Here are a few reasons why:"


Via John Evans
more...
juandoming's curator insight, July 18, 2:24 AM

add your insight...

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Aprendiendoaenseñar
Scoop.it!

10 Prácticos recursos para fomentar la creatividad de tus alumnos

10 Prácticos recursos para fomentar la creatividad de tus alumnos | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
¿Por qué la escuela mata la creatividad de tus alumnos? ¿Qué responsabilidad tienes como docente en el proceso creativo de tus alumnos? ¿Fomentas la creat

Via Minerva Bueno, Wilmer Ramírez
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

Carbon Control: What America’s New Climate Change Offensive Looks Like

Carbon Control: What America’s New Climate Change Offensive Looks Like | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
UPDATE: On June 23, the U.S. Supreme Court effectively upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's authority, under the Clean Air Act, to regulate carbon and

Via Beth Dichter
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 4, 6:12 PM

If you are looking for a visual that looks at the new rules surrounding carbon emission and at what each state may have to do and how others are perceiving the new regulations you should check out this visual. You may scroll down the page (first click through to the site) or you can view it as a slideshow.

This visual would be great to share with students as it is designed as a cartoon (with many panels). It is easy to understand and describes where carbon emissions come from (in the US) as well as the impact this may have on countries outside the US.

Scooped by Luciana Viter
Scoop.it!

Using Dialogue Circles to Support Classroom Management

At Glenview Elementary School, dialogue circles are part of a program aimed at building collaboration, respect, and positive behavior among students.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Technology in Education
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Why Classroom Movement Gets an A+

Infographic: Why Classroom Movement Gets an A+ | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

"Sitting is a learned behavior, passed on through tradition and adults, and today’s sedentary lifestyles are affecting our youth and their classroom performance. Studies show that more activity throughout the school day improves health and academic outcomes."


Via Beth Dichter, Yasemin Allsop
more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 26, 8:10 PM

Our students sit most of the day. Yet research tells us that activity is beneficial, that movement throughout the day improves academic outcomes. This infographic shares information on this subject and includes a list of resources.

faezams's curator insight, July 4, 8:17 PM

Brain breaks- vital for all learning.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Handy Online Tools for Schools
Scoop.it!

Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled

Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, most world political maps aren't telling you the whole story. The idea that the earth's land is cleanly divvied up into nation-states - one country for each of the world's peoples - is more an imaginative ideal than a reality. Read on to learn about five ways your map is lying to you about borders, territories, and even the roster of the world's countries."


Via Seth Dixon, Petra Pollum
more...
David Smart's curator insight, June 23, 3:26 PM

add your insight...

Sally Egan's curator insight, June 23, 3:32 PM

Amazing stories on the World's changing Geopolitical status. Current stories about disputed borders, unrecognised territories and  newly declared nations.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 29, 6:41 PM

Nunca é "Toda a Verdade" ... 

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Technologies in ELT
Scoop.it!

Why Teachers Should Be Trained Like Actors

Why Teachers Should Be Trained Like Actors | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Teaching is a lot like acting, a high-energy, performance profession that requires a person to act as a role model. But when teachers go through training and professional development, the performance aspect of the job is rarely emphasized or taught. Acknowledging this aspect could be a missed opportunity to restructure ways teachers learn new skills and tactics.

Via Evelyn Izquierdo
more...
Evelyn Izquierdo's curator insight, June 21, 2:44 PM

There is no doubt that teachers develop many important skills during their teaching life, but definitely performing as actors and actresses is one of the most useful and enjoyable tasks in the classroom. Some teachers are very good at that, others need more training. This article discusses the role of performing as a teaching strategy and how being trained like actors/actresses may contribute to develop not only good academic habits but successful practices.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

Why It's Time To Rethink (And Question) Homework

Why It's Time To Rethink (And Question) Homework | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
The concept of homework as we have known it in the past is changing rapidly, since it often distorts the overall picture of learning. Flipped classrooms, the ability to use the same technology and tools both in and out of the classroom, and personalized learning are making ripples in the education world. And while most …

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Daniel Tan's curator insight, June 23, 4:42 PM

Homework vs home vs work, underlined by learnIng. Homework was originally designed  as an extension of a lesson to reinforce  what was taught.

 

What if now students are becoming more self directed and self motivated?  Fast and easily assessible content disrupts the "teacher-dependent student" paradigm, allowing (and motivating) the  student to self learn and group learn (student-student) rather beyond the formal homework.