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15 Conflict Resolution Tips For Educators - Edudemic

15 Conflict Resolution Tips For Educators - Edudemic | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
If you're looking for some conflict resolution tips to use in school and the classroom, these are some of the best you can find.
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Educational resources by teachers for teachers.  Recursos educacionais por professores para professores.  
Curated by Luciana Viter
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from STEM Connections
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How well do you know the world's countries?

How well do you know the world's countries? | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
The average person's geography skills are fairly poor beyond their region. Test your knowledge of the countries at HowStuffWorks.

Via Seth Dixon, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 9, 3:58 PM

The questions are more "recall" than "higher order thinking" questions, but this batch of 30 questions is still a fun break from the regular routine. 

 

Tags: trivia, games.

Audrey DeSisto's curator insight, February 9, 4:32 PM

On to geography...

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Meu aluno(a) não faz lição de casa. E agora? (Parte I - adultos)

Meu aluno(a) não faz lição de casa. E agora? (Parte I - adultos) | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Configurar o problema é fácil: Todo mundo tem pelo menos um(a) aluno(a) que não faz as tarefas de casa, muitos têm muitos. Há alunos que fazem a tarefa tão raramente que, quando fazem a gente quase cai de costas. Dentre os adultos, o motivo mais frequente é a falta de tempo por excesso de trabalho…
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Radical Pedagogy - Visual Thinkery

Radical Pedagogy - Visual Thinkery | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
My wife is my signpost – for some things, anyway. She reads faster than me and tells me of books that I might like. I have but one requirement: at the end of the book, I want to be able to say “I’ve never read anything like that before”. As a result, I’ve been enjoying …

Via juandoming, Suvi Salo, Ivon Prefontaine
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 6, 8:25 PM

Paulo Freire's work was aimed largely at adults. Certainly, we want children to question the world and explore it, but will they understand what oppression really is and subvert it? We can begin the process with open dialogue including eloquent questions without fixed answers and understand we exist in radically contingent worlds. We do not know what is around the next corner.

Frances's curator insight, February 7, 9:53 AM

A tool you can use.  Thank you Bryan.

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Beginning and Ending Class Like a Pro with Brian Sztabnik

Beginning and Ending Class Like a Pro with Brian Sztabnik | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
The four minutes beginning and ending class matter most according to teacher Brian Sztabnik. How to make the most of those valuable minutes.

Via Lisa Durff, kathyvsr
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 23, 11:31 AM

This involves conversations rather than technology. Interestingly enough, the etymology of technology suggests a dialogue and conversation between people and their tools.

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from IELTS, ESP, EAP and CALL
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More plastic than fish in the oceans by 2050, report warns

More plastic than fish in the oceans by 2050, report warns | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
The world is throwing the equivalent of a rubbish truck of plastic waste into
the oceans every minute - and the rate of pollution is only likely to
increase

Via Dot MacKenzie
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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30 Ways To Teach Science Without a Textbook (Pinterest board)

30 Ways To Teach Science Without a Textbook (Pinterest board) | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Looking for unique ways to teach science without a textbook? 1. Go to a children’s museum. 2. Go to a science museum. 3. Visit the zoo. | See more about Textbook and Science.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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3 Communities Transition Away From Fossil Fuels to Run on 100% Renewables | Cole Mellino | EcoWatch.com

3 Communities Transition Away From Fossil Fuels to Run on 100% Renewables | Cole Mellino | EcoWatch.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

Communities around the world aren’t waiting for global leaders to take action on climate change. They’re taking action now.

This episode of In the World, an original series by Fusion, highlights three communities that have already transitioned away from fossil fuels to run completely on renewables.

One of communities featured, Burlington, Vermont, was featured on EcoWatch earlier this year when it became the first U.S. city of any decent size to run on renewable electricity. The other two communities—Dardesheim, Germany and Dharnai, India—provide exciting models for other cities and towns around the world that are beginning to make the transition to clean energy.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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¿Cómo puede ganar dinero extra un docente de aula?

¿Cómo puede ganar dinero extra un docente de aula? | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Ya veis que me restrinjo al docente que, día tras día, está dando lo mejor de él en sus clases y que, en ningún momento hablo de toda esa cantidad de personajes

Via Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales
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22 Powerful Closure Activities

22 Powerful Closure Activities | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
22 Powerful Closure Activities
DECEMBER 15, 2015
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Photo credit: Stephen Luke via flickr (CC BY 2.0)
Too many university supervisors and administrators criticize the absence of lesson closure, a dubious assessment practice likely caused by the improper use of Madeline Hunter’s lesson plan model (PDF) as a de facto checklist of eight mandatory teaching practices -- anticipatory set, objective and purpose, input, modeling, checking for understanding, guided practice, independent practice, and closure -- a custom that Hunter decried in 1985 (PDF). Although it offers multiple benefits, please don't view closure as a professional must-do.

What Is Closure?
Closure is the activity that ends a lesson and creates a lasting impression, a phenomenon that Colorado State University professor Rod Lucero calls the recency effect.

Teachers use closure to:

Check for understanding and inform subsequent instruction
Emphasize key information
Tie up loose ends
Correct misunderstandings
Students find closure helpful for:

Summarizing, reviewing, and demonstrating their understanding of major points
Consolidating and internalizing key information
Linking lesson ideas to a conceptual framework and/or previously-learned knowledge
Transferring ideas to new situations
Like contracting your bicep at the top of a dumbbell curl, closure squeezes an extra oomph into a lesson. See my favorite closure strategies below!

Creative Closure Activities
1. Snowstorm
Students write down what they learned on a piece of scratch paper and wad it up. Given a signal, they throw their paper snowballs in the air. Then each learner picks up a nearby response and reads it aloud.

2. High-Five Hustle
Ask students to stand up, raise their hands and high-five a peer -- their short-term hustle buddy. When there are no hands left, ask a question for them to discuss. Solicit answers. Then play "Do the Hustle" as a signal for them to raise their hands and high-five a different partner for the next question. (Source: Gretchen Bridgers)

3. Parent Hotline
Give students an interesting question about the lesson without further discussion. Email their guardians the answer so that the topic can be discussed over dinner.

4. Two-Dollar Summary
Kids write a two-dollar (or more) summary of the lesson. Each word is worth ten cents. For extra scaffolding, ask students to include specific words in their statement. (Source (PDF): Ann Lewis and Aleta Thompson)

5. Paper Slide
On paper, small groups sketch and write what they learned. Then team representatives line up and, one and a time, slide their work under a video camera while quickly summarizing what was learned. The camera doesn't stop recording until each representative has completed his or her summary.

6. DJ Summary
Learners write what they learned in the form of a favorite song. Offer extra praise if they sing.

7. Gallery Walk
On chart paper, small groups of students write and draw what they learned. After the completed works are attached to the classroom walls, others students affix Stickies to the posters to extend on the ideas, add questions, or offer praise.

8. Sequence It
Students can quickly create timelines with Timetoast to represent the sequence of a plot or historical events.

9. Low-Stakes Quizzes
Give a short quiz using technologies like Socrative, BubbleSheet, GoSoapBox, or Google Forms. Alternatively, have students write down three quiz questions (to ask at the beginning of the next class).

10. Cover It
Have kids sketch a book cover. The title is the class topic. The author is the student. A short celebrity endorsement or blurb should summarize and articulate the lesson's benefits.

11. Question Stems
Have students write questions about the lesson on cards, using question stems framed around Bloom's Taxonomy. Have students exchange cards and answer the question they have acquired.

12. So What?
Kids answer the following prompts:

What takeaways from the lesson will be important to know three years from now?
Why?
13. Dramatize It
Have students dramatize a real-life application of a skill.

14. Beat the Clock
Ask a question. Give students ten seconds to confer with peers before you call on a random student to answer. Repeat.

15. Find a First-Grade Student
Have kids orally describe a concept, procedure, or skill in terms so simple that a child in first grade would get it.

16. Review It
Direct kids to raise their hands if they can answer your questions. Classmates agree (thumbs up) or disagree (thumbs down) with the response.

17. CliffsNotes, Jr.
Have kids create a cheat sheet of information that would be useful for a quiz on the day's topic. (Source (PDF): Ann Sipe, "40 Ways to Leave a Lesson")

18. Students I Learned From the Most
Kids write notes to peers describing what they learned from them during class discussions.

19. Elevator Pitch
Ask students to summarize the main idea in under 60 seconds to another student acting as a well-known personality who works in your discipline. After summarizing, students should identify why the famous person might find the idea significant.

20. Simile Me
Have students complete the following sentence: "The [concept, skill, word] is like _______ because _______."

21. Exit Ticket Folder
Ask students to write their name, what they learned, and any lingering questions on a blank card or "ticket." Before they leave class, direct them to deposit their exit tickets in a folder or bin labeled either "Got It," "More Practice, Please," or "I Need Some Help!" -- whichever label best represents their relationship to the day's content. (Source: Erika Savage)

22. Out-the-Door Activity
After writing down the learning outcome, ask students to take a card, circle one of the following options, and return the card to you before they leave:

Stop (I'm totally confused.)
Go (I'm ready to move on.)
Proceed with caution (I could use some clarification on . . .)
Download the PDF cards for this exercise. (Source: Eduscapes)

These 22 strategies can be effectively altered or blended. And they are great opportunities to correct, clarify, and celebrate.

Do you use a closure activity that's not on this list? Please share it in the comments.

Via TD
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Why does time always run forwards and never backwards?

Why does time always run forwards and never backwards? | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Why is it you can break an egg, but not make the pieces spring back together again? To find out, we have to go back to the birth of the universe

Via Skip Zalneraitis
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How I changed the perception of lesson plans at my school - Daily Genius

How I changed the perception of lesson plans at my school - Daily Genius | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
I was reminded last week of one of the great unmentionables. A teacher was absent and I heard some rumblings about lesson plans. As any school administrator knows, no one ever says anything good about lesson plans. The norm is a non-verbal look of piercing annoyance when lesson plans are mentioned. I actually created the school’s …

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Dean J. Fusto
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Sem gritar: 4 táticas diferentes para que os alunos te escutem

Sem gritar: 4 táticas diferentes para que os alunos te escutem | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Pesquisar sobre um tema, encontrar material pertinente, pensar sobre a estratégia de ensino, chegar à classe. Planejar uma aula requer tempo e dedicação, esforços que podem ser em vão caso os alunos fiquem dispersos…
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12 Crazy Things You Should Never, Ever Say To A Teacher

12 Crazy Things You Should Never, Ever Say To A Teacher | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Not to your neighbor who is a teacher, not to your brother. Just don’t.
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25 Attention Getters to Calm A Noisy Classroom

25 Attention Getters to Calm A Noisy Classroom | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
If you are in need of some great attention getters to calm your noisy classroom, this list is just for you!
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Educational technology , Erate, Broadband and Connectivity
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Diversity

Diversity | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

Find resources to help build an inclusive school community for students from different cultural, socioeconomic, and linguistic backgrounds and for children with unique instructional needs.


Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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Interactive graphic: How nations compete on technology, innovation, and financial development

Interactive graphic: How nations compete on technology, innovation, and financial development | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Each year, the World Economic Forum (WEF) produces its Global Competitiveness Report, a comprehensive assessment of national economic competitiveness. The WEF organizes its analyses into rankings to shed light on the drivers contributing to national productivity and prosperity. Explore the map to compare the most globally and regionally competitive countries, and engage with data that...

Via Suvi Salo, Miloš Bajčetić
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Suvi Salo's curator insight, January 19, 4:00 PM

via @ValaAfshar

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, January 20, 7:43 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

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Here's what happened when a school tried recess four times a day | A. Pawlowski | USAToday

Here's what happened when a school tried recess four times a day | A. Pawlowski | USAToday | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

"There was a part of me that was very nervous about it," Donna McBride, a first-grade teacher at the school, told TODAY Parents.

"I was trying to wrap my head around my class going outside four times a day and still being able to teach those children all the things they needed to learn."

Related: Why some schools are banning homework

Some five months into the experiment, McBride's fears have been alleviated. Her students are less fidgety and more focused, she said. They listen more attentively, follow directions and try to solve problems on their own instead of coming to the teacher to fix everything. There are fewer discipline issues.

"We're seeing really good results," she noted.

Parents are seeing them, too.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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First Impressions: Activities for the First Day of Class

First Impressions: Activities for the First Day of Class | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Students are never more attentive than they are on the first day of class. It's the perfect time to communicate expectations and set the tone for learning.

Via Rosemary Tyrrell
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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, January 8, 7:22 PM

Some practical and useful advice for breaking the ice on the first day. 

Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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This is the fuel NASA needs to make it to the edge of the solar system — and beyond | Chelsea Harvey | WashPost.com

This is the fuel NASA needs to make it to the edge of the solar system — and beyond | Chelsea Harvey | WashPost.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

Just in time for the new year, researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have unveiled the fruits of a different kind of energy research: For the first time in nearly three decades, they’ve produced a special fuel that scientists hope will power the future exploration of deep space.

The fuel, known as plutonium-238, is a radioactive isotope of plutonium that’s been used in several types of NASA missions to date, including the New Horizons mission, which reached Pluto earlier in 2015. While spacecraft can typically use solar energy to power themselves if they stick relatively close to Earth, missions that travel farther out in the solar system — where the sun’s radiation becomes more faint — require fuel to keep themselves moving.

Plutonium-238 satisfies this need by producing heat as it decays, which can then be converted into electricity by NASA’s radioisotope power system, a kind of nuclear battery called the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator, or MMRTG. Excess heat from the MMRTG can also be used to keep some spacecraft systems from freezing in cold environments — a service it’s been providing for the Curiosity rover on Mars, for instance.

While other isotopes could theoretically also get the job done, plutonium-238 is ideal because of its “unique combination of properties,” said Rebecca Onuschak, a program director in the Department of Energy’s Office of Space and Defense Power Systems. Most notably, it’s safer to work with than many other types of radioactive materials.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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This Is What an Entire Day Where the Sun Doesn't Set Looks Like

This Is What an Entire Day Where the Sun Doesn't Set Looks Like | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

While we’re wrapping up winter, Antarctica is getting fully into the swing of summer—and there that can mean an entire day of sunlight. Here’s what that looks like.


Via Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks, Suvi Salo, Javier Antonio Bellina
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century
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Why Scandinavian schools are superior (and what we can learn)

Nordic schools (Finland included) captivate American educators. What makes them so strong?

Via Grant Montgomery
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5 Powerful Ways to Save Time as a Teacher :: Cult of Pedagogy :: Jennifer Gonzalez

5 Powerful Ways to Save Time as a Teacher :: Cult of Pedagogy :: Jennifer Gonzalez | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Lack of time is a huge problem for teachers everywhere. There’s just never enough time for teachers to do their work well AND have a healthy, balanced life outside the classroom. For as long as I have been working to serve teachers and help you do your work better, time was always the one problem I couldn’t solve. I could share powerful teaching strategies, classroom management tips, game-changing tech tools, but when it came to really nailing the time shortage, I came up empty-handed.

Until now.

Via Jim Lerman
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This is the most detailed map yet of our place in the universe | Brad Plumer | Vox.com

This is the most detailed map yet of our place in the universe | Brad Plumer | Vox.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

We know that the Earth and the solar system are located in the Milky Way galaxy. But how, exactly, does the Milky Way fit in among the billions of other galaxies in the known universe?

In a fascinating 2014 study for Nature, a team of scientists mapped thousands of galaxies in our immediate vicinity, and discovered that the Milky Way is part of a jaw-droppingly massive "supercluster" of galaxies that they named Laniakea.

This structure is much, much, much bigger than astronomers had previously realized. Laniakea contains more than 100,000 galaxies, stretches 500 million light years across, and looks something like this (the Milky Way is just a speck located on one of its fringes on the right):

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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