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Educational resources by teachers for teachers.  Recursos educacionais por professores para professores.  
Curated by Luciana Viter
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"Lucky imaging" creates fiery composite of Jupiter | Michael Franco | GizMag.com

"Lucky imaging" creates fiery composite of Jupiter | Michael Franco | GizMag.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

At this moment, the Juno spacecraft is hurtling towards Jupiter where it is set to take up orbit on July 4.


To help map the planet for that rendezvous, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) has used an instrument on its Very Large Telescope (VLT) to create a stunning image of the solar system's largest planet.


To bring the image to life, the space agency relied on a technique known as "lucky imaging.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Why Is OCTober Not The 8th Month?

Why Is OCTober Not The 8th Month? | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
So a month is 30 days right? Except for the ones that have 31 days and then the one that has 28 but then sometimes that has 29 days.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Space Debris 1957 2015

Almost 20,000 pieces of space debris are currently orbiting the Earth. This visualisation, created by Dr Stuart Grey, lecturer at University College Londo
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This is the fuel NASA needs to make it to the edge of the solar system — and beyond | Chelsea Harvey | WashPost.com

This is the fuel NASA needs to make it to the edge of the solar system — and beyond | Chelsea Harvey | WashPost.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

Just in time for the new year, researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have unveiled the fruits of a different kind of energy research: For the first time in nearly three decades, they’ve produced a special fuel that scientists hope will power the future exploration of deep space.

The fuel, known as plutonium-238, is a radioactive isotope of plutonium that’s been used in several types of NASA missions to date, including the New Horizons mission, which reached Pluto earlier in 2015. While spacecraft can typically use solar energy to power themselves if they stick relatively close to Earth, missions that travel farther out in the solar system — where the sun’s radiation becomes more faint — require fuel to keep themselves moving.

Plutonium-238 satisfies this need by producing heat as it decays, which can then be converted into electricity by NASA’s radioisotope power system, a kind of nuclear battery called the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator, or MMRTG. Excess heat from the MMRTG can also be used to keep some spacecraft systems from freezing in cold environments — a service it’s been providing for the Curiosity rover on Mars, for instance.

While other isotopes could theoretically also get the job done, plutonium-238 is ideal because of its “unique combination of properties,” said Rebecca Onuschak, a program director in the Department of Energy’s Office of Space and Defense Power Systems. Most notably, it’s safer to work with than many other types of radioactive materials.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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5 maneiras como os seres humanos poderiam destruir todo o Sistema Solar

5 maneiras como os seres humanos poderiam destruir todo o Sistema Solar | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
De desastres envolvendo aceleradores de partículas até jornadas intergalácticas mal planejadas, confira a seguir um pouco do potencial destrutivo da humanidade

Via PHPapartirdo0
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Dark matter is found in the Milky Way’s core

Dark matter is found in the Milky Way’s core | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Scientists, led by the Technical University of Munich, said the rotation of stars and gas in the heart of the Milky Way cannot be explained without the presence of dark matter in the universe.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*
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Como veríamos o céu noturno sem poluição luminosa?

Como veríamos o céu noturno sem poluição luminosa? | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Fotógrafo registra incrível série em que mostra como seriam os céus se não houvesse iluminação pública.
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Mapa interactivo para ver la Tierra desde el Espacio

Mapa interactivo para ver la Tierra desde el Espacio | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Hoy comparto con vosotros un mapa interactivo con muchas fotografías de la Tierra desde el Espacio, son imágenes obtenidas por el astronauta Tim Peake durante los seis meses de su misión en la Estación Espacial Internacional.

Via Gumersindo Fernández
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The Universe may be expanding much faster than we thought | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com

The Universe may be expanding much faster than we thought | Anthony Wood | GizMag.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

New measurements carried out using the Hubble Space Telescope suggest that the Universe may be expanding up to 9 percent faster than previously believed. The team behind the study, which is the most accurate of its kind ever undertaken, believe that the culprit for the unexpected acceleration could be one of the invisible phenomena thought to comprise roughly 95 percent of the Universe.

The new study observed the light signatures of around 2,400 Cepheid variable stars in 19 different galaxies, as well as those of 300 Type Ia supernova. Cepheids and Type Ia supernovae constitute part of the Cosmic Distance Ladder – an invaluable tool for astronomers attempting to map the vast distances between galaxies.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Luciana Viter from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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5 Tools to Watch the Night Sky and Track Events in Astronomy

5 Tools to Watch the Night Sky and Track Events in Astronomy | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Today, you don't have to use a telescope to enjoy the wonders of space. These sites and apps are for real-life star-gazers who need to know what to look at up above.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Harriet Rolfe's curator insight, May 30, 10:03 PM

Some great interactive tools to foster a love of space!

John Edwards's curator insight, May 31, 4:00 AM
Definitely worth checking these out... or buy a telescope :-)
Rescooped by Luciana Viter from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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This is the most detailed map yet of our place in the universe | Brad Plumer | Vox.com

This is the most detailed map yet of our place in the universe | Brad Plumer | Vox.com | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it

We know that the Earth and the solar system are located in the Milky Way galaxy. But how, exactly, does the Milky Way fit in among the billions of other galaxies in the known universe?

In a fascinating 2014 study for Nature, a team of scientists mapped thousands of galaxies in our immediate vicinity, and discovered that the Milky Way is part of a jaw-droppingly massive "supercluster" of galaxies that they named Laniakea.

This structure is much, much, much bigger than astronomers had previously realized. Laniakea contains more than 100,000 galaxies, stretches 500 million light years across, and looks something like this (the Milky Way is just a speck located on one of its fringes on the right):

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Is the universe about to collapse? Study says event is 'imminent'

Is the universe about to collapse? Study says event is 'imminent' | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Researchers from the University of California, Davis, and the University of Nottingham say the theory may help explain dark energy and why the rate of expansion in the universe has accelerated.
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How Humanity Will Conquer Space Without Rockets

How Humanity Will Conquer Space Without Rockets | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Getting out of Earth's gravity well is hard. Conventional rockets are expensive, wasteful, and as we're frequently reminded, very dangerous. Thankfully, there are alternative ways of getting ourselves and all our stuff off this rock. Here's how we'll get from Earth to space in the future.

Via Artur Coelho
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16 Astronomical Events in 2014 and How to Watch Them

16 Astronomical Events in 2014 and How to Watch Them | Banco de Aulas | Scoop.it
Few instances of regret are worse than missing rare astronomical events that come (sometimes literally) once in a lifetime.
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