bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry
943 views | +0 today
Follow
bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry
Focuses on the visual aspects of herbals, receipt books, and still room manuals
Curated by Marybeth Shea
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Syrup jar used to store Viper's Grass Water, Rome, Italy, 1701-1800

Syrup jar used to store Viper's Grass Water, Rome, Italy, 1701-1800 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Scorzonera hispanica, black salsify or Spanish salsify, also known as black oyster plant, serpent root, viper's herb, viper's grass or simply Scorzonera, is a perennial member of the genus Scorzonera in the sunflower family (Asteraceae)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Drug jar showing St John the Baptist, Italy, 1570-1630

Drug jar showing St John the Baptist, Italy, 1570-1630 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Syrup jar used to store Oil of Violets, Italy, 1701-1730

Syrup jar used to store Oil of Violets, Italy, 1701-1730 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Artemisnin, from "sweet Annie"

Artemisnin, from "sweet Annie" | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

The herb Artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood, has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and has treated fevers for over 2000 years. In the 1960s the Chinese government began trying to isolate active ingredients in traditional remedies which might be useful for treating malaria. In 1972 artemisinin, or qinghaosu in Chinese, was isolated from Artemisia annua by Chinese scientists. It was effective against strains of malaria which were resistant to other drugs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Drug jar for extract of cinchona bark, Lambeth, London, England, 1710-1740

Drug jar for extract of cinchona bark, Lambeth, London, England, 1710-1740 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

'A list of two thousand microscopic objects' book by Andrew Pritchard, England, 1835

'A list of two thousand microscopic objects' book by Andrew Pritchard, England, 1835 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Albarello drug jar used for Balsam of the Philosophers, Italy, 1701-1800

Albarello drug jar used for Balsam of the Philosophers, Italy, 1701-1800 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Albarello drug jar used for Lacc, Italy, 1701-1730

Albarello drug jar used for Lacc, Italy, 1701-1730 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Lac comes from insects; a fixative and medicine, as well as the current base of the wood treatment:  shellac.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Model alligator, England, 1801-1900

Model alligator, England, 1801-1900 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Hung in apothecary shops in Europe

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

The book of distillation. - NLM Catalog - NCBI

Catalog of books, journals, and audiovisuals at the National Library of Medicine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Directions for collecting and preserving botanical specimens. - NLM Catalog - NCBI

Catalog of books, journals, and audiovisuals at the National Library of Medicine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Syrup jar for Oil of Puppy Dogs, Italy, 1701-1800

Syrup jar for Oil of Puppy Dogs, Italy, 1701-1800 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Oglio di Cagnolini is Italian for “Oil of Puppy Dogs”. A recipe from 1696 recommends boiling two live puppies (less than nine days old) with Oil of Violets until the bones break down before adding 1 lb (0.45 kg ) of earthworms (probably live) and wine. The mixture was boiled and the resulting oil used to soothe aches and pains. It is shown here with three similar oils made from animals. Only Oil of Foxes had universal approval from medical and pharmacy texts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Dispensing pot for powdered quinine, Italy, 1801-1830

Dispensing pot for powdered quinine, Italy, 1801-1830 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Diorama showing a 1400s consultation with a physician, United Kingdom, 1970-1979

Diorama showing a 1400s consultation with a physician, United Kingdom, 1970-1979 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Several scenes from a mediaeval encyclopaedia have been combined in this diorama to show the tasks performed by a physician. On the left, bloodletting is being performed. Some diseases such as fever were thought to be caused by too much blood in the body. Removing the excess blood was believed to cure the patient. On the right, uroscopy examination of the urine, is being carried out. The colour, smell and taste of urine were thought to help diagnose patient’s illnesses. The encyclopaedia De proprietatibus rerum (The Order of Things) was written in Latin by Bartholomaeus Anglicus, a Franciscan monk living in the 1200s. The encyclopaedia covered theology, medicine, botany, astronomy, zoology and other sciences of the time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

Anthropomorphic Iris root, England, 1891-1900

Anthropomorphic Iris root, England, 1891-1900 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Iris root is source of orris power, a fixative in perfumes and flavors.

 

Anthropomorphic objects are those whose shape resembles that of a human. They have often been attributed with special powers or healing properties. This piece of iris root, with its vaguely human shape, was believed to have curative powers. It may have been used to reduce the pain of teething as iris root rubbed on the gums was a well known way to relieve pain. This object was acquired in Whitechapel, in the East End of London, in 1900 by Edward Lovett (1852-1933). Lovett was a collector of British amulets and charms and documented different medical traditions and beliefs. He believed that carrying such roots was a particularly Jewish custom.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

kivaford

kivaford | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
As seen in the NY Times, InStyle Magazine, Etsys Handmade Portraits, Time Out New York, and more!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marybeth Shea
Scoop.it!

American household botany : a history of useful plants, 1620-1900 - NLM Catalog - NCBI

Catalog of books, journals, and audiovisuals at the National Library of Medicine.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marybeth Shea from Herbaria
Scoop.it!

Victorian Treasure: Emily Dickinson's Herbarium- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More

It is not widely known that our great American poet Emily Dickinson was a practiced gardener before she became an accomplished poet. And though her poetry is boldly original and even "modern" in so many of its attributes such as intense com...
more...
No comment yet.