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bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry
Focuses on the visual aspects of herbals, receipt books, and still room manuals
Curated by Marybeth Shea
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Marie Meurdrac

Marie Meurdrac | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
Check out http://womenalchemists.com!
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Part of Robin Gordon's work on the history of women and alchemy.  Forthcoming book, 2013:

https://rowman.com/ISBN/9780761860556

 

Marie Meurdrac was an accomplished 17th century chemist.

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Edgar Fahs Smith Memorial Collection

Edgar Fahs Smith Memorial Collection | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Water bath scheme and notes (woodcut print), before 1535.  Balneum mariae or furnace vessel is a distillation extension of the simple water bath.

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Oldest book edges Oxfam towards historic £2 million - Thame Today

Oldest book edges Oxfam towards historic £2 million - Thame Today | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
Thame TodayOldest book edges Oxfam towards historic £2 millionThame TodayThe donor of the historical distillation volume was aware of its value, but this is not always the case.
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Ancient red dye powers new 'green' battery: Chemists use plant extract in eco-friendly, sustainable lithium-ion battery

Ancient red dye powers new 'green' battery: Chemists use plant extract in eco-friendly, sustainable lithium-ion battery | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
Rose madder -- a natural plant dye once prized throughout the Old World to make fiery red textiles -- has found a second life as the basis for a new "green" battery.
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Medicine Woman : Emory Magazine

Medicine Woman : Emory Magazine | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Inspired by her own difficult medical history, Cassandra Quave researches traditional remedies to find ways to fight MRSA and other superbugs.


Via Eve Emshwiller
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A visit to the Urban Physic Garden

A visit to the Urban Physic Garden | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Jane Perrone explores a pop-up community garden that's spreading the word about the power of plants.
A pair of men in suits playing ping pong on a table fashioned from a skip; echinacea and arnica thriving in a raised bed marked "Dermatology Ward"; teas and coffees served out of the back of an ambulance - the Urban Physic Garden in Southwark isn't your usual "lovely garden" open for visitors to wander on the lawn and murmur approval of the hydrangeas.
An army of volunteers have transformed a patch of wasteland earmarked for future development, hunkered down in the shadow of the Shard into a pop-up physic garden, packed full of medicinal plants and a place for learning, fun and film screenings


Via Ruth Bastow
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The Four Seasons (1865) , by Sarah Mary Fitton

The Four Seasons (1865) ,  by Sarah Mary Fitton | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
A Short Account of the Structure of Plants: Four Lectures...

 

Digital "Read it" format of this charming and important book.

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Book Review - The Paper Garden - By Molly Peacock

Book Review - The Paper Garden - By Molly Peacock | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
A biography of an 18th-century widow who, in her 70s, invented a new way to depict flowers.
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Volume 4, Number 1 (2011), Research Centre for Literature, Arts and Science, University of Glamorgan

Special Issue: Women and Botany

Sam George and Alison E. Martin, 'Introduction. Botanising Women: Transmission, Translation and European Exchange’ (1-11)
PDF

Sam George, 'Epistolary Exchange: the Familiar Letter and the Female Botanist, 1760-1820’ (12-29)
PDF

Alison E. Martin, 'Revolutions in Botany: Nation, Gender and Education in the French Translation of Priscilla Wakefield’s Introduction to Botany (1796)’ (30-43)
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Betty Hagglund, 'The Botanical Writings of Maria Graham’ (44-58)
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Heidi Hansson, 'Emily Lawless and Botany as Foreign Science’ (59-73)
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Flora and Femininity by Susan Branson in Common-places, January 2012

Flora and Femininity by Susan Branson in Common-places, January 2012 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Selected clip, featuring Jane Colden:

 

"Embroidered orchards and peony hair ornaments testify that women were practitioners of floral display, but many women sought knowledge as well as style. Linnaean taxonomy gave order to the botanical world; plants could be identified and classified by anyone once they mastered Linnaeus's straightforward system based on the sexual characteristics of plants. Jane Colden is perhaps the best example of an eighteenth-century American woman who diligently studied the Linnaean system (albeit in English rather than Latin). As a teenager living with her father, the scientist Cadwallader Colden, in New York's Hudson Valley, she put her knowledge into practice by classifying over 300 species of local plants in the 1750s. British collector Peter Collinson learned of Jane Colden's achievements through correspondence with her father, and Collinson passed on to Linnaeus himself the fact that Jane Colden was "perhaps the first lady that has perfectly studied Linnaeus' system." Colden continued her botanical studies up until her marriage, at age thirty-five, in 1759. She passed away the following year. Her notebook, carefully preserved by her family, eventually found its way into the Natural History Museum in London."

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Botanical Dialogues Between Hortensia and Her Four Children, Charles, Harriot, Juliette and Henry

Botanical Dialogues Between Hortensia and Her Four Children, Charles, Harriot, Juliette and Henry | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Maria Elisabetha Jacson's 1797 edition of her botany lessons book.

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JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 23, No. 3 (Spring, 1990), pp. 301-317

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'The Herball or Generall Historie of Plants', book, London, England, 1633

'The Herball or Generall Historie of Plants', book, London, England, 1633 | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
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Rowman.com: 9780761860556 - Searching for the Soror Mystica: The Lives and Science of Women Alchemists

Rowman.com: 9780761860556 - Searching for the Soror Mystica: The Lives and Science of Women Alchemists | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
Early scientists, or natural philosophers as they were known, did not seek knowledge in the disconnected way modern academics tend to do. They were interested in how the universe worked, which meant studying everything from astrology and physics to Jewish mysticism and the Christian Bible. They constructed connections that the modern thinker might overlook or even dismiss as preposterous. In this book, Robin L. Gordon explores the lives and alchemical practice of a number of remarkable women. Searching for the Soror Mystica touches upon the history of science, biography, classical Jungian psychology, women’s studies, theology, and a dash of the occult sciences. Readers will encounter sixteenth to seventeenth century politics, religion, scientific inquiries, medical discoveries, and even the way love can result in some misguided choices.

 

Marybeth Shea's insight:

Forthcoming! Robin Gordon's website here:

http://www.womenalchemists.com/Home_Page.php

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Fiction as a way to understand women and alchemy: Sylvia Townsend Warner

Fiction as a way to understand women and alchemy: Sylvia Townsend Warner | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Be sure to consider the book by Sylvia Townsend Warner, 1929, about Laura, aka Lolly, and her witch work.

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Salvia Chewing Gum: a Formula For Enhancing Psycho-spirituality

Salvia Chewing Gum: a Formula For Enhancing Psycho-spirituality | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Salvia, as its name suggests (Latin salvere, to feel well and healthy) has for millenia been used as a herb. Now the use in chewing gum as been patented!

 

"The present invention relates to a chewing gum formulation that serves as a means for awakening human consciousness and mindfulness to the sensorial subtleties, which in turn strengthens sovereignty such that overall psycho-spirituality is enhanced. ..."


Via Annals of Botany: Plant Science Research
Marybeth Shea's insight:

Salvia, now in a gum and not likely gum Arabic.....

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Marybeth Shea's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:20 AM

Deeper into the patent application, the need for spiritual enlightenment is given.  Cannot imagine that patent examiners often read such paragraphs on the job. :)

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Ezra Update: Biomolecular archaeologist uncorks the past

Ezra Update: Biomolecular archaeologist uncorks the past | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Archaeology of wine and beer: Biomolecular archaeologist uncorks world's oldest known grape wine.

Many brewers were women.


Via Eve Emshwiller
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30,000-Year-Old Wild Flax Fibers

[published in 2009]

 

A unique finding of wild flax fibers from a series of Upper Paleolithic layers at Dzudzuana Cave, located in the foothills of the Caucasus, Georgia, indicates that prehistoric hunter-gatherers were making cords for hafting stone tools, weaving baskets, or sewing garments. Radiocarbon dates demonstrate that the cave was inhabited intermittently during several periods dated to 32 to 26 thousand years before the present (kyr B.P.), 23 to 19 kyr B.P., and 13 to 11 kyr B.P. Spun, dyed, and knotted flax fibers are common. Apparently, climatic fluctuations recorded in the cave’s deposits did not affect the growth of the plants because a certain level of humidity was sustained.


Via Dorian Q Fuller, Eve Emshwiller
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Rain Gardens.pdf - Google Documents

Nice overview from the inventors of rain gardens:  Prince George's County, MD and Larry Coffman (now at Low Impact Development Center).

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An Artist of the Botanical World » AoB Blog

An Artist of the Botanical World » AoB Blog | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
Weblog of the Annals of Botany...
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Women and the Garden: Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (1715–1785)

Women and the Garden: Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland (1715–1785) | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
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An introduction to botany, in a series of familiar letters

An introduction to botany, in a series of familiar letters | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Google offers this free ebook of Priscilla Bell Wakefield's charming 1807 book. Wakefield, a Quaker, is also know for innovating a children's saving bank, often called the Penny Bank.

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Michigan State University Libraries - Women and Botany in 18th and Early 19th-Century England Exhibit - Botanical Dialogues, Between Hortensia and Her Four Children...

Michigan State University Libraries - Women and Botany in 18th and Early 19th-Century England Exhibit - Botanical Dialogues, Between Hortensia and Her Four Children... | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it
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Flora Delanica: Art and Botany in Mrs. Delany’s “paper mosaicks”

Flora Delanica: Art and Botany in Mrs. Delany’s “paper mosaicks” | bain de Marie: Women and the roots of botanical chemistry | Scoop.it

Pancratium Maritinum

 

For much of her long life, Mary Delany (1700-1788) was in many ways a typical 18th century society woman of accomplishments. She was an excellent “amateur” artist and also mastered the arts of japanning, silhouettes and embroidery. She was a prolific letter writer and, influenced by the work of Samuel Richardson, wrote a novel, Marianne, which she illustrated. Mrs. Delany was also an avid student of botany, zoology and the natural sciences. But it was at the age of 72 that Mary Delany began the work that brought her lasting renown: her Flora Delanica—nearly 1000 botanical collages that she completed over the following decade. These “paper mosaicks,” as she called them, are incredibly intricate and delicate, the level of detail and botanical accuracy is stunning.

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The Healthy Skeptic: Gripe water is safe for babies with colic, but there is no scientific evidence that it works

Gripe water and other herbal tonics for colic have been around for hundreds of years.  Making a comeback?

 

With so many crying babies out there, it's no surprise that a lot of parents are willing to try just about anything to get some peace and quiet. Many swear by gripe waters, herbal tonics available at drugstores and health food stores everywhere. A study published this month in the journal Pediatrics found that about 9% of babies are given herbal products in their first year of life; of all the options out there, gripe water was the most popular choice.

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