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Mubarak trial wrenches emotions of Egyptians

Mubarak trial wrenches emotions of Egyptians | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

For some, even the sight of their weakened president did not dent their anger.

"I would rather have mercy for a dog or cat than this man. This whole scene of him on a stretcher is an act. He could have sat down and talked. This is just to try to gain the nation's sympathy," said Somaya Sa'ad, 63, retired.

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Judge Promises Speedy Trial For Mubarak : NPR

Judge Promises Speedy Trial For Mubarak : NPR | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
The former Egyptian president, his security chief and six top police officers face possible death sentences if found guilty on charges they ordered the use of lethal force against protesters during Egypt's 18-day uprising.
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The Associated Press: Mubarak trial evokes mixed feelings in Arab world

The Associated Press: Mubarak trial evokes mixed feelings in Arab world | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
Some hoped the trial, which began Wednesday in Cairo, would be the first of several bringing longtime autocrats to justice. Others weren't quite sure what to make of the spectacle, torn between a desire for justice and the discomfort of seeing a once-all-powerful Arab leader treated like a common criminal.
For many others from North Africa to the Persian Gulf, the trial carried a deeper meaning. It was, in the words of pastry shop owner Saif Mahmoud in Baghdad, a rewriting of the rules between the region's people and their leaders. That's because unlike Iraq's Saddam Hussein, who was captured by American forces, Mubarak was brought to court by his own people.
In the West Bank city of Ramallah, 29-year-old Palestinian Salah Abu Samera saw emerging democracy.
"It's unusual in the Arab world," he said. "This is the first time we see a leader in a real court. This is good for democracy, good for the future. We've always heard of leaders on trial in Israel, in Turkey, in the U.S., or Europe. But this is the first time in the Arab world."

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