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Human Rights and the Will to be free
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INSIGHT: Bahrain – Losing the PR War on Human Rights

INSIGHT: Bahrain – Losing the PR War on Human Rights | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Bahrain’s government seems determined to sabotage its own image.  It complains that it’s misunderstood and unfairly criticized, but then continues to make decisions that baffle or enrage its international allies. Foreign criticism of Bahrain’s poor human rights record is increasing.

Earlier this week, the U.S. Commission of International Religious Freedom cited “increased rhetoric from official media outlets inflaming sectarian tensions and demonizing the Shi’a Muslim population,” and a failure to hold any senior official to account for torture. ....




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Former CNN reporter alleges CNN accepted money from Bahrain to ignore oppression

Former CNN reporter alleges CNN accepted money from Bahrain to ignore oppression | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Breaking here in the U.S. are allegations that CNN and its CNN’s international arm engaged in accepting money from oppressive Islamic nations such as Bahrain to promote flattering reporting instead of the oppression the regime has engaged in against its citizens. CNN International also denied showing a documentary about Bahrain and its oppression on its people. ....

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CNN is bought-off by AlKhalifa terrorists in Bahrain

CNN is bought-off by AlKhalifa terrorists in Bahrain | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
On 19 June 2011 at 8pm, CNN's domestic outlet in the US aired "iRevolution" for the first and only time. The program received prestigious journalism awards, including a 2012 Gold Medal from New York Festival's Best TV and Films.

 

See 'iRevolution' subpart on Bahrain:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zB2DeZBgTEk 

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Bahrain portion of iRevolution on CNN June 19 2011

Bahrain portion of iRevolution on CNN June 19 2011...
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Bahrain’s PR Campaign Is Doomed to Fail |

Bahrain’s PR Campaign Is Doomed to Fail | | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

I was at an interesting meeting the other day at a London-based think tank, where a Bahrain-regime spokesperson earnestly told me that there was no point spending money on PR to make Bahrain look good anymore, as everybody knows about the Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry report confirming that torture was widespread and systematic in Bahrain during the uprising. Funny then, that the regime seems to continue to employ a bunch of firms to do PR work for them. In fact, a number of individuals and groups giving evidence to the UK’s Foreign Affairs Committee inquiry on the UK’s relationship with Saudi Arabia and Bahrain are known affiliates of the Bahraini regime—including retired general Sir Graeme Lamb, who is employed by G3, one of the biggest firms currently working to boost Bahrain’s reputation, but failed to mention that association in the evidence he presented to the committee......

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‘Bahrain buys favorable CNN content’ — RT

‘Bahrain buys favorable CNN content’ — RT | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

What CNN is doing is they are essentially creating what some people have termed “infomercials for dictators.” And that’s the sponsored content that they are airing on CNN International that is actually being paid for by regimes and governments. And this violates every principle of journalistic ethics, because we’re supposed to be watchdogs on these governments. We are not supposed to allow them to be a paying customer as journalists. And that’s the issue here – that CNN is feeding, then, this propaganda to the public and not fairly disclosing to the public that this is sponsored content.
For example CNN has been doing these programs for Georgia, Kazakhstan, also as we said Bahrain. One of the programs that they aired for Bahrain was called Bahrain i-List and had a CNN reporter Richard Quest lie from Bahrain for one full week. He was live at the racetrack at one point. There were mentions on his page about pearl diving and all the happy sides of Bahrain. But hard to find were the actual accusations from the majority of the Bahrain people that this regime needs to get out and that this regime is abusing and torturing doctors and journalists. Also difficult to find [were] accurate, simple disclosures on the CNN site and on this video telling viewers that this video you’re watching on this news channel – the most trusted name in news – is being paid for by this regime.”

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CNN's attempt to discredit story about compromised Bahrain coverage

CNN's attempt to discredit story about compromised Bahrain coverage | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

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CNNi has nothing to say about the extensive financial dealings it has with the regime in Bahrain (what the article called "the tidal wave of CNNi's partnerships and associations with the regime in Bahrain, and the hagiography it has broadcast about it"). It has nothing to say about the repellent propaganda it produces for regimes which pay it. It has nothing to say about the Bahrain-praising sources whose vested interests with the regime are undisclosed by CNN. It provides no explanation whatsoever for its refusal to broadcast the iRevolution documentary. It does not deny that it threatened Lyon's severance payments and benefits if she spoke critically about CNNi's refusal. And it steadfastly ignores the concerns and complaints raised by its own long-time employees about its conduct.

In sum, CNNi's response does not deny, or even acknowledge, the crux of the reporting, and simply ignores the vast bulk of the facts revealed about its coverage of, and relationship with, the regime in Bahrain. Indeed, one searches its response in vain for any explanation to the central question which New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof asked nine months ago: .....

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