Human Rights and the Will to be free
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Bahrain, MENA & Arab Spring
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Al Khalifa dynasty’s days are short - analyst - Interviews - Panorama | Armenian news

Al Khalifa dynasty’s days are short - analyst - Interviews - Panorama | Armenian news | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

"...

I think the world outside of the United Sates knows more about the oppression in Bahrain than people in the United States and the United States government is trying to keep it quiet because every crime that is going on in Bahrain, the suppression of freedom of speech, the denial of human rights, the torture that is going on in the jails and the indiscriminate jailing of anybody who voices their opinion against the autocratic monarchy they get jailed and tortured and killed and that contradicts everything the United States supposedly stands for.

It contradicts democracy, it contradicts human rights, it contradicts women’s rights, it contradicts the rights of free conscience and that is why the United States does not want to air its dirty linen because Bahrain is the United States’ dirty linen.

We are responsible for the murder that is going on there and the United States government knows it and that is why most of the people in the State Department are appalled about what we are doing in Bahrain and they do not like it...."

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European Parliament Condemns Violations in Bahrain

European Parliament Condemns Violations in Bahrain | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

48 out of 55 members of the European parliament approved a resolution condemning human rights violations in Bahrain.

MEPs insist on "for the immediate and unconditional release of all prisoners of conscience, political activists, journalists, human rights defenders and peaceful protesters, including Nabeel Rajab, Abdulhadi Al-Khawaja, Ibrahim Sharif, Naji Fateel, and Zainab Al-Khawaja".

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Activist urges U.S. to press ‘ruthless and brutal’ Bahrain | The Raw Story

Activist urges U.S. to press ‘ruthless and brutal’ Bahrain | The Raw Story | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

In 2011 Reda al-Fardan watched in horror as Bahraini troops plowed down protestors camped at a Manama roundabout. Now he is among Shiite activists urging greater pressure on the monarchy to implement long-promised reforms.

“It’s a moral choice,” Fardan said, after meeting in Washington with top Obama aide Susan Rice to urge the United States to throw its weight behind activists.

His NGO, Bahrain Watch, is calling for a transparent, accountable government in the nation ruled by the Sunni Khalifa dynasty since the late 18th century, amid fears of a dangerous and growing sectarian divide.

 

 

Fardan, 29, grew up in the western Shiite coastal village of Karzakan, and witnessed how the tumult caused by the Arab spring unleashed decades of anger against failure to introduce democratic reforms.

Protests launched on February 14, 2011 led to the Manama sit-in, where Fardan saw Bahraini troops first unleash rubber bullets and tear gas, and followed a few weeks later by Saudi tanks.

“We all know that the government is ruthless and brutal, but seeing it first hand, just each day you see this again and again… things become emotional.”

Around 90 people have died in the protests which have now simmered for almost three years, and about 2,500 people are believed to remain in jail.

Bahrain Watch is leading a campaign called “Stop the Shipment” amid fears a South Korean company, DaeKwang Chemical, is considering supplying some 1.6 million rounds of tear gas to Bahrain — more than the island’s entire 1.2 million population.

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#Saudi protesters call on Riyadh to withdraw from #Bahrain

#Saudi protesters call on Riyadh to withdraw from #Bahrain | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

The demonstrators accused Saudi officials of committing crimes against pro-democracy protesters in Bahrain.

They slammed Saudi Arabia for supporting and helping Manama in its violent crackdown on the Bahrainis. They called for the release of political prisoners.

The demonstrators also called on international rights groups to speak out against the continuous torture and abuse of Saudi Arabian prisons....

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Bahrain: Silenced Spring

Bahrain: Silenced Spring | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

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The Bahraini government “believes they have international immunity,” says Maryam al-Khawaja, acting head of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, “and they’re right.” Bahrain’s sensitive geographic location, just across the Persian Gulf from Iran, has meant that King al-Khalifa and his family have enjoyed a cozy relationship with the United States in recent years, exchanging cheap weapons for a Bahraini base for the US Navy’s 5th Fleet. Ideological and material support from its Saudi neighbors have provided the Bahraini king an extra measure of protection against criticism from Western governments, which can’t function without a steady stream of cheap Saudi crude. “Saudi oil,” al-Khawaja says, “is more valuable [to the West] than Bahraini lives.” Until world leaders make human rights a priority over their stakes in the global marketplace, we can expect more grim news from the Gulf. That is, if we get any at all.

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أوركسترا الثورة البحرينية - شمعة وطن - Home's Candle

Bahraini revolution Orchestra - Candle homeland - February 18, 2012
artwork An_ak_i shows an important aspect of the demands of the Bahraini people for freedom and democracy. The true picture and symbolic about the reality of oppression by the authority to the categories of the Bahraini people demands for democracy.
includes working son of a martyr and my rights and political and doctor detained and poet.
An art singing workTel showing an important aspect of demands sought by the majority of Bahraini people in their pursuit of freedom and democracy; also, the artistic work provides a true depiction of oppressive practices committed by the regime to numerous categories of Bahrainis whilst pursuing democracy; the work includes contributions from son of a martyr, a human rights defender, a politician, a physician, a detainee and a poet. contributions from son of a Martyr, a human rights defender, a politician, a physician, a detainee and a poet.

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Bahrain Goes From Bad to Worse

Bahrain Goes From Bad to Worse | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

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The US State Department condemned the declaration as an attack on Bahraini citizen’s universal human rights to free expression and association. State Department spokesman Mark Toner expressed “deep concern,” adding that he urged the government of Bahrain to "work with responsible protest leaders to find a way for peaceful and orderly demonstrations to take place. The decision to curb these rights is contrary to Bahrain's professed commitment to reform and will not help advance national reconciliation nor build trust among all parties.” The US has a strong interest in maintaining stability in Bahrain, which hosts the US Navy’s 5th Fleet.

British minister for the Middle East and North Africa Alistair Burt joined the chorus of disapproval, calling the move “excessive” and reminding the monarchy that “peaceful protest is a democratic right.” U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was somewhat more forceful in his criticism, pointing out that the restrictions violate international human rights standards, including respect for freedom of expression, peaceful assembly and association, and urging the government to lift them immediately.

Rather than lifting the restrictions, the Bahraini government has continued full steam ahead. ....

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UK's anti-Assad rhetoric exposes hypocrisy over Bahrain brutality

Bahrain authorities has been violently clamping down on protests for the past 18 months, with accusations of brutality by the regime. However, the kingdom has pledged to improve on its treatment of political activists and try to prevent violence against ethnic and religious communities. That's after criticism and recommendations from the UN Human Rights body. But western leaders effectively closed their eyes to what's happening in the country, with other concerns in the region.

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Bahrain is Britain’s shame | Index on Censorship

Bahrain is Britain’s shame | Index on Censorship | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Today at the Houses of Parliament, Maryam al-Khawaja asked MPs to put pressure on Bahrain to commit to reforms and free politcal prisoners, including her father and sister. Here, the prominent human rights defender denounces Britain’s indifference

When confronted with the facts of its own brutal crackdown on popular protests and human rights defenders, Bahraini officials usually stick to a routine. They hide behind tired lines of denial and hype supposed reforms. The actual situation on the ground continues to deteriorate — and inaction from the international community has emboldened the government. Most astounding is the silence from one of Bahrain’s greatest allies: the United Kingdom. ....

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ملك وفساد دولة (2)- رد السنّة على ملك البحرين | Property and corruption of the State ( Pt 2)

ملك وفساد دولة (الحلقة الثانية) دكتاتور أهل السنة في البحرين - رابط الجزء الأول http://youtu.be/Td1obXNfODo فلم وثائقي يحتوي على ردود أهل السنة في البحرين وف...

 

See also:  http://is.gd/xjzENe

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Thai woman taps communications tools to escape with 9 others from Bahrain brothel - The Nation

Thai woman taps communications tools to escape with 9 others from Bahrain brothel - The Nation | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Thai woman taps communications tools to escape with 9 others from Bahrain brothel The Nation A 30-year-old Thai woman used all her wits and knowledge of communications technology to help herself and nine other Thai women escape from forced  prostitution in a Bahrain brothel.....

 

They were waiting for the fasting month of Ramadan to get over as clients stopped buying sex during the Muslim holy month....

 

They arrived at the embassy at 2am but the guard did not permit them to wait inside. However, luck was on their side as the Bahraini taxi driver took pity on them and dropped them off at a hotel and paid for the room - Bt2,000 - telling them not to come out or contact anybody.

They came back to the Thai Embassy in the morning and received help. Police also got the seven others out of the hotel.

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Al-Khalifa terrorists steal Bahraini lands!

Al-Khalifa terrorists steal Bahraini lands! | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Why are the people in #Bahrain so angry? Here is one reason! ... This island is called Jeddah which is supposed to be  public property of the people. It was an isolated prison like "Alcatraz" ... Al Khalifas turned it into a PRIVATE PROPERTY for them!!   No one is allowed to see it at ALL...

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Three Years Later, Reform in Bahrain Is Nowhere to be Seen

Three Years Later, Reform in Bahrain Is Nowhere to be Seen | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

It's three years ago this month that troops from Saudi Arabia entered the island kingdom of Bahrain to help the government there crack down on protests for reform. The violent attack on protesters and the subsequent deaths and arrests by Bahraini security forces pose a test for U.S. human rights policy -- and it is a test the United States is failing.

The Bahrain regime -- a key U.S. ally in the Gulf -- has succeeded in recasting a broad-based movement for democracy into a struggle against Iranian influence. U.S. ambivalence has abetted this narrative and, unless things change, it risks becoming a self-fulfilling prophecy.

Bahrain hosts the U.S. Fifth Fleet and has been an American military ally for decades. Stability is critical to the relationship. The king's uncle has been the un-elected prime minister for over 40 years; that's one kind of stability. But when a country's jails become populated by peaceful dissidents -- including some who are there simply for tweets critical of the king -- that is a sign of instability, and should be cause for U.S. concern.

A stable, democratic Bahrain that respects the rule of law is a more reliable partner than a volatile dictatorship. The Bahraini government knows this, so it blames the movement for democratic reform on agents of Tehran, reducing the struggle for human rights to a Shia versus Sunni conflict and claiming that the rights movement has been hijacked by extremists out to establish an Islamic caliphate.

There's no doubt Iran will seek to exploit Bahrain's political chaos. But if the United States -- and the Bahraini regime -- really want to foil Iran, they should be making common cause with those who seek participatory democracy.

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'Regime in Bahrain is very keen to cover its violations'- expert

'Regime in Bahrain is very keen to cover its violations'- expert | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

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Has anything changed for the better in Bahrain since then?

Absolutely not. In fact, it has got worse. There is a lot of chaos in public relations and propaganda exercises that the Bahrain regime I believe is very much led in by their preps from Washington or London. This propaganda was for example calling the international commission on human rights. It was in November in 2011, they convened this commission and the commission has come up with some disturbing things about the violations going on plus recommendations about how to reform the police or what have you. But it was all white notch. The regime has completely ignored all the recommendations that this commission came up with and that the regime undertook. And Washington and London knew this pretty well. They are really well aware of the cynicism, that is going on in Bahrain and have turned a blind eye to it, the issue of the occasional rhetorical concern about human rights violations in Bahrain. Fundamentally it is completely disingenuous because the regime is continuing, they are repressing people, violating rules, imprisoning people, arbitrarily torturing them to death while in prison, shooting them on the street with impunity, using excessive, massive amounts of tear gas that poisons people in their homes. With all the violations, the west says nothing about it.
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Bahrain: The Arab Spring Protests You Don't Know About

Bahrain: The Arab Spring Protests You Don't Know About | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

The government of Bahrain has made a mistake by ignoring the will of the majority of its own people.  King Hamad bin Isa Al-Khalifa has refused to incorporate members of the Shiite elite into the government. ....

After the major protests, the government didn't change the country's political system to incorporate the Shia majority into politics. Bahrain's electoral system is one of the most notorious examples of the persisting discrimination. To ensure Sunni domination in the elections, constituencies have been gerrymandered; although Shiite citizens account for two-thirds of the population, less than half of the seats in the National Assembly are held by Shiite representatives. The government has allowed harassment of opposition politicians, banned several NGOs that monitored the government, and arrested journalists and bloggers.

The Shiite community has suffered economically since the end of the major wave of protests in 2012. Due to high unemployment, almost 53,000 Shiite families are waiting to receive housing from the government, but most are passed over due to Bahrain's policy of naturalizing and providing housing to Pakistanis, Yemenis, Jordanians, and Syrians to balance the Shia-Sunni ratio.

Although protests still smolder in Bahraini towns, world attention is turned to the spectacular events in Egypt, Syria, and Turkey. All protests have been banned in Bahrain since October, but the ban hasn't stopped the opposition from taking to the streets to demand the resignation of the world's longest-serving prime minister, Khalifa bin Salman Al-Khalifa, the king's uncle, who has been in office for 32 years now. The passion of protesters has remained strong; they are still able to fill the streets of the capital, Manama, as well as smaller towns....

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What the Hell is going on in Bahrain?

And to what extent is the United States implicated?

an evening with Maryam al-Khawaja, Acting DIrector of the Bahrain Center for Human RIghts & scion of the Nobel-nominated al-Khawaja family

in conversation with

Aryeh Neier
president emeritus of the Open Society Foundations

Ruth Wedgwood
of Johns Hopkins University
U.S. member, UN Rights Committee (2203-2011)

& Sarah Leah WHitson
director of the Middle East division of Human Rights Watch

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U.S. Warns Protests Could "Break Apart" Bahrain, Topple Regime

U.S. Warns Protests Could "Break Apart" Bahrain, Topple Regime | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

U.S. Warns Protests Could "Break Apart" Bahrain, Topple Regime
The Obama administration is quietly warning that Bahrain’s ongoing internal unrest could lead to the overthrow of the ruling Sunni monarchy. Protests have continued in Bahrain for nearly two years despite a U.S. backed-crackdown that has seen the use of military forces from neighboring Gulf regimes, the jailing and beating of opposition activists, and the recent ban of all public demonstrations. In a briefing to reporters last week, two State Department officials warned that Bahrain could "break apart" if the protests continue, an outcome they say would be beneficial to Iran while detrimental to the "enormous [U.S.] security interests" in Bahrain, which hosts the U.S. Navy’s Fifth Fleet. The officials gave the briefing on the condition they not be identified by name. The White House says it is calling on Bahrain to heed the calls of an independent commission that urged political reforms one year ago. At the United Nations, a spokesperson for the High Commissioner for Human Rights criticized Bahrain’s recent moves against the opposition, including revoking the citizenship of 31 political figures as well as sentencing medics who treated wounded protesters to three months behind bars.
Rupert Colville: "The High Commissioner urges the government to reconsider this decision, which stands in clear violation of Article 15 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states that, 'Everyone has the right to a nationality' and, 'No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality.' The High Commissioner is also concerned by the sentencing of 23 medical professionals on the 21st of November, and reiterates her call on the authorities to release all individuals who have been detained or sentenced simply for exercising their right to demonstrate peacefully."
The United Nations says it will send a fact-finding mission to assess human rights conditions in Bahrain early next month...

 

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Citizenship as a Bahraini Government Tool | Stratfor

Citizenship as a Bahraini Government Tool | Stratfor | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

The Bahraini Royal Charity Organization and the Jordanian Hashemite Charity Organization signed an agreement Sept. 10 to build four schools for children at a Syrian refugee camp in Jordan. The agreement highlights Bahrain's increasing involvement with Jordan's Syrian refugees. More important, Bahrain -- with the support of Saudi Arabia -- has begun a process to naturalize Sunni Syrian refugees in an effort to augment the minority Sunni population amid rising Shiite dissent.

These efforts are only one way in which Persian Gulf countries are trying to capitalize on the crisis in Syria. However, this initiative is unlikely to make a significant impact on Bahrain's Sunni population for several years. In the meantime, it could upset the country's delicate security situation.

Analysis
Shia make up a majority of Bahrain's population of more than 1 million, but the government is primarily Sunni. However, the government is unwilling to acknowledge Shia as the dominant sect, so specific numbers of Sunnis and Shia are unknown. Shiite opposition groups have challenged the Sunni al-Khalifa government several times throughout the kingdom's history. The current challenge is one of the longest and has lasted 19 months so far.

Bahrain's naturalization law, which was enacted in 1963, has been a point of contention in the latest incarnation of government opposition. The law stipulates that a naturalized citizen must own real estate and must have lived in Bahrain for 25 years, or 15 years if the individual is Arab. The law does allow the royal family to make any Arab a citizen if he has rendered Bahrain "great services" -- a stipulation that leaves room for wide interpretation. For more than a decade some Shia have accused the royal family of strictly enforcing every condition of this law when it pertains to Shiite citizenship while expediting the citizenship process for Sunni Arabs, including Sunni foreign nationals. While the exact number of naturalized citizens is unknown, the U.S. State Department estimated in January 2011 that Bahrain has naturalized roughly 40,000 individuals in the past 50 years.

The conflict in Syria has afforded Bahrain -- and Saudi Arabia, by extension -- a unique opportunity to try to address its demographic dilemma. A Stratfor source indicated that the Bahraini government is working to naturalize more than 5,000 Sunni Syrian refugees living in the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan. The source added that the government has even established a cultural center at the camp to acquaint the refugees with Bahraini culture. Saudi Arabia has directed Bahrain to naturalize Sunni refugee families with children in order to increase Sunni representation without adding to the work force, since the country is already facing a jobs shortage. Bahraini involvement with Syrian refugees in Jordan corresponds with financial investments Bahrain made Sept. 10 when the country agreed to help fund four schools for 4,000 children at Zaatari.

As is the case with many of the Bahraini government's decisions, Saudi Arabia has had input in this initiative and has chosen to back it in an effort to reduce sectarian tensions in Bahrain. Saudi Arabia has also attempted to influence the Syrian revolution since it began, by rhetorically and financially supporting Syrian opposition elements. Saudi Arabia views supporting the Syrian opposition as a means to bring down the Iranian-backed Syrian regime and thus weaken Iran's arc of influence in the region. However, recently Riyadh seems to have tempered its support for the Syrian opposition due to fears that it might lead to an uncontrollable jihadist resurgence in the region. Although Saudi Arabia has subdued its role in influencing the situation inside Syria, Riyadh's backing of Bahrain's naturalization initiative indicates that the Saudis are still trying to create opportunities to capitalize on the Syrian revolution.

Risks and Implications of the Initiative

Naturalizing 5,000 Sunnis could help bolster the minority Sunni population in Bahrain in the long term, as the naturalized Sunnis expand their families. However, the initiative also presents several domestic security threats and drawbacks in the short term. First, bringing thousands of refugees into Bahrain will be a financial burden. As refugees, the Syrians likely do not have much money, yet they will require transportation from Jordan to Bahrain, as well as homes and jobs once they arrive in the country. However, since Saudi Arabia supports this initiative, Riyadh will likely aid in the financing.

More important than the financial burden is the security risk associated with naturalizing 5,000 Sunni Syrian refugees. From a domestic security standpoint, Shiite-led protests in Bahrain are still happening, and many Shia continue to demand greater rights for their sect and continue to blame the regime for shifting the sectarian balance through the subjective naturalization laws. Since late 2011 the protests have grown increasingly violent and have featured violence against South Asian expatriate workers in particular and to a lesser extent against expatriates in general. Some Shia claim these expatriates are taking jobs from Shiite workers and that the regime only granted them citizenship to bolster the support for the government. Although the Bahraini government intends to keep this initiative quiet, the arrival of Syrian refugees could incite radical anti-government Shia to target them with violent attacks. But it will even more likely lead to a resurgence of large Shiite-led protests of the perceived biased naturalization by the government.

On a regional level, it is possible that some of these Syrian refugees have ties to Syrian rebel fighters or Islamist or Salafist jihadists -- some may even subscribe to such ideologies themselves. Although it can be expected that these refugees will be screened and evaluated, it is very difficult to ensure that none of the adult refugees are predisposed or connected to such individuals and ideologies. Any such individual poses a threat, not only to Bahrain, whose government still faces threats from radical Shiite elements, but also to the broader Gulf region. As new Bahraini citizens, the erstwhile refugees will be able to travel, live and work in any of the Gulf Cooperation Council countries using only an identity card. The last thing Saudi Arabia needs is an influx of people who have subscribed to or are sympathetic to the jihadist ideology. Jihadist sympathies can be exploited easily -- especially in the Gulf countries, where extremists are not difficult to find.

In several years, it is possible that having made these Syrian refugees Bahraini citizens will have helped grow the domestic Sunni population and will have limited opposition to the government; but there are serious risks involved with such efforts. Not only is such an initiative expensive, but it could further threaten the stability of Bahrain and the surrounding region -- a risk that Saudi Arabia and Bahrain have shown they are willing to take. At the very least, it can be expected that once the Shiite opposition realizes this initiative exists, protests will increase and intensify, threatening the al-Khalifa government and Bahrain's security apparatus.

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Bahrain: Act on UN Human Rights Commitments

Bahrain: Act on UN Human Rights Commitments | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

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Bahrain accepted four recommendations calling for an end to the intimidation and harassment of human rights defenders, as well as policies restricting international rights organizations including Human Rights Watch from visiting Bahrain. In its response to the UPR recommendations, the government claimed misleadingly that, “There are no restrictions on the activities of non-government organizations,” and that it “doesn’t prohibit [NGOs’] entry into Bahrain.”

Many Bahraini human rights defenders face routine harassment, arbitrary arrest and threats by government officials. On August 16, Nabeel Rajab, president of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights, was sentenced to three years in prison for organizing and participating in peaceful demonstrations without permits in early 2012.

“The Bahraini government’s failure to carry out key recommendations of the BICI report raises concerns it won’t fulfill the UPR recommendations either,” Stork said. “Bahrain should take this opportunity to free people convicted for engaging in free speech and peaceful assembly, hold accountable officials of all ranks responsible for abuses, and give international rights groups access to visit Bahrain without unnecessary restrictions.”

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UN singles out 16 countries, including Bahrain, for government reprisals against critics

UN singles out 16 countries, including Bahrain, for government reprisals against critics | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
GENEVA — The United Nations has singled out 16 nations for cracking down on critics, saying most of those countries’ governments are going unpunished for their acts of reprisal.
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Manama, Bahrain: Under military occupation in the financial district.....

Manama, Bahrain:  Under military occupation in the financial district..... | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
Security forces again fired tear gas and arrested demonstrators in Bahrain's capital on Friday, as protesters renewed their calls for reform and the release of political prisoners.

 

Sayed Yousif @SayedYousif

"Access to the financial district in capital #Manama is denied or granted on identity. They check your name. #Bahrain      pic.twitter.com/Gk8dZbdm    "

 

Dr Ala'a Shehabi   @alaashehabi
"Police have blocked off every entrance in to downtown #Manama & then they say that protests disrupt the capital!! #HeavyTraffic #Bahrain  "

 

Bilad Media Network  @BiladQadeemENG   @MARYAMALKHAWAJA

"Spy balloon picture     pic.twitter.com/VXCcBErf   "


 

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ملك وفساد دولة (1)- رد السنّة على ملك البحرين | Property and corruption of the State (Pt 1)

ملك وفساد دولة (الحلقة الأولى) دكتاتور أهل السنة في البحرين - رابط الجزء الثاني http://youtu.be/G2yILGcT-KU فلم وثائقي يحتوي على ردود أهل السنة في البحرين وف...

 

See also:  http://is.gd/sdmOb2

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'Al Khalifa lacks legitimacy in Bahrain'

'Al Khalifa lacks legitimacy in Bahrain' | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Interview with Mohsen Saleh, professor at the Lebanese University, Beirut...

Saleh: Well that clearly shows that the Bahraini government, or Al Khalifa government - Of course, it’s not the Bahraini government anymore; it lacks any kind of legitimacy to control over Bahrain. Al Khalifa as a family are really using all kinds of injustice and all instruments of the Americans and the Saudis in order to put down the Bahrainis.

In spite of all this some international organizations are telling this government, or this regime, that these people are innocent, especially the activists of human rights like Nabeel Rajab and they should free them.

And of course they are imprisoning also besides Nabeel Rajab many children, many women, and men of literacy and still continuing their torment of the Bahrainis.

It’s about time for these international organizations to bring these people to justice. From the King and from the Interior Minister, from the Prime Minister, all these people really should be brought to justice and also in prison instead of imprisoning the natives of Bahrain.

These are not the natives they are using, they are using mercenaries i.e. foreign forces whether the Saudis or from Pakistan paying money to make them employees for the family.

Now we have the Bahraini people and we have government. The Bahrainis are going into the streets to express their condemnation of this government and it should really move..., let the Americans take the Al Khalifa because they are their agents in the region. ...

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