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The 3 Worst Ways Companies Waste Money in Social Media | Social Media Today

The 3 Worst Ways Companies Waste Money in Social Media | Social Media Today | Badvertising | Scoop.it
They say you learn something new everyday...And one of the things I recently learned was a new oxymoron: a social media budget.Because in most companies, it simply doesn't exist.
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Dinosaur die out might have been second of two closely timed extinctions

Dinosaur die out might have been second of two closely timed extinctions | Badvertising | Scoop.it

The most-studied mass extinction in Earth history happened 65 million years ago and is widely thought to have wiped out the dinosaurs. New University of Washington research indicates that a separate extinction came shortly before that, triggered by volcanic eruptions that warmed the planet and killed life on the ocean floor.

 

The well-known second event is believed to have been triggered by an asteroid at least 6 miles in diameter slamming into Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula. But new evidence shows that by the time of the asteroid impact, life on the seafloor – mostly species of clams and snails – was already perishing because of the effects of huge volcanic eruptions on the Deccan Plateau in what is now India.

 

“The eruptions started 300,000 to 200,000 years before the impact, and they may have lasted 100,000 years,” said Thomas Tobin, a UW doctoral student in Earth and space sciences. The eruptions would have filled the atmosphere with fine particles, called aerosols, that initially cooled the planet but, more importantly, they also would have spewed carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases to produce long-term warming that led to the first of the two mass extinctions.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Scientists unearth ostrich-like dinosaurs

Scientists unearth ostrich-like dinosaurs | Badvertising | Scoop.it

Ostrich-like dinosaurs roamed the Earth millions of years ago using feathers to attract a mate or protect offspring rather than for flight, according to a new study. Researchers from the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, and the University of Calgary made the discovery in the 75-million-year-old rocks in the badlands of southern Alberta.

 

The ostrich-like dinosaurs, known as ornithomimids, were thought to be hairless, fleet-footed birds and were depicted as such in the Hollywood movie Jurassic Park. But the researchers found evidence of feathers with a juvenile and two adult skeletons of ornithomimus, a species within the ornithomimid group.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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If 10-Year-Olds Ran an Ad Agency

If 10-Year-Olds Ran an Ad Agency | Badvertising | Scoop.it
Are you better at advertising than a 5th grader? Probably not, judging by this entertaining video from Grip Limited, a Toronto ad agency that celebrated its 10th birthday recently by putting a bunch of 10-year-olds in charge of the place.
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Retro Future Ads For Facebook, YouTube & Skype

Retro Future Ads For Facebook, YouTube & Skype | Badvertising | Scoop.it
Sao Paulo ad agency Moma Propaganda created a wondeful series of retro future ads for Facebook, YouTube and Skype as part of the "Everything Ages Fa...
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A Happy, Flourishing City With No Advertising | Advertising on GOOD

A Happy, Flourishing City With No Advertising | Advertising on GOOD | Badvertising | Scoop.it
In 2006, Gilberto Kassab, mayor of São Paulo, Brazil, passed the "Clean City Law." Citing growing concerns about rampant pollution in his city, Kassab decided enough was enough. But this was no ordinary piece of pollution ...
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