Badges for Lifelong Learning
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Badges for Lifelong Learning
Supported by the MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Initiative
Curated by HASTAC
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Badges – the Good, the Meh, and the Ugly

Badges – the Good, the Meh, and the Ugly | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

Badges recognize that meaningful learning can happen in units smaller than a 750 minute credit hour. The backpack concept makes it easier for learners to aggregate credentials (I am under no illusion that badges are not credentials written small). The replacement of A-B-C-D-F with badge or no badge (now everything is pass-fail, in essence) may reduce relentless sorting pressure.

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Badges! (with Special Reference to Public Folklore) #dmlbadges

Badges! (with Special Reference to Public Folklore) #dmlbadges | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

There is a great deal of discussion of this new program going on online and the conversation suggests that many folks have already invested a lot of brain power into working out the norms, forms, and aims of the emergent badge-based education and credentialing landscape. I am interested and sympathetic but too new to have any deeply informed opinions (beyond my support for the open source software/open standards aspects, my overall belief in the importance of life long learning, and my recognition of plural educational pathways and diverse learning styles/goals).

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Badges for Learning Info & Press Release | HASTAC

Badges for Learning Info & Press Release | HASTAC | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

A badge is a validated indicator of accomplishment, skill, quality or interest that can be earned in any of these learning environments. Badges can support learning, validate education, help build reputation, and confirm the acquisition of knowledge. They can signal traditional academic attainment or the acquisition of skills such collaboration, teamwork, leadership, and other 21st century skills.
Badges are used successfully in games, social network sites, and interest-driven programs to set goals, represent achievements and communicate success. A digital badge is an online record of achievements, the work required, and information about the organization, individual or other entity that issued the badge. Badges make the accomplishments and experiences of individuals, in online and offline spaces, visible to anyone and everyone, including potential employers, teachers, and peer communities.

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NASA Expands Its Education Portfolio With Digital Badging

NASA Expands Its Education Portfolio With Digital Badging | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

NASA Administrator Bolden told the crowd of more than 200 how pleased he was that NASA has joined this new effort to encourage lifelong learning. He shared that NASA’s Office of Education has conducted an assessment of activities, interests and needs in the kindergarten to 12th-grade area. NASA has identified robotics and teamwork as two themes for constructing NASA's initial digital badge set, which will focus on grades 4-12. Future NASA Teamwork Digital Badges could be developed to focus on other mission and research areas.

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We Do, In Fact, Need Some (Non-Stinking) Badges | Brainstorm - The Chronicle of Higher Education

We Do, In Fact, Need Some (Non-Stinking) Badges | Brainstorm - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

The utility and propriety of systems that revolve around open education resources and open credentials is obviously going to vary a lot depending on the field in question. Journalism, for example, has a wary relationship with higher education in part because journalists don’t need academic credentials to prove their value in the marketplace. Their work is their credential...In other fields it will be more important to have a credentialing process in place.

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On Education, Badges and Scouting | Aaron E. Silvers

On Education, Badges and Scouting | Aaron E. Silvers | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

I love the idea of merit badges in education, but only if we’re going to bring with them the framework by which they are effective. As an Eagle Scout, the thing I remember most was the different mentoring I had from people in the community I wasn’t exposed to. Police officers, firefighters, forestry people, craftsmen, farmers… I had to have a relationship with people across many fields in order to advance. I valued the direct mentoring I had with my Scouting leaders who shared life lessons and made decisions to advance me (and sometimes slow me down to develop a little more) with great amounts of care.

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The Importance of “Open” in Mozilla’s Open Badges Project

The Importance of “Open” in Mozilla’s Open Badges Project | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

The emphasis I think most people are looking at today (based on the reactions I saw via Twitter at least) were on the “badges” aspect. Is this just a digital version of getting a star next to your name when you line up nicely and quietly to go to the library? Are badges juvenile? Are badges just a trend? Do badges reward inconsequential achievements? Are badges better/worse than grades, than graduation certificates? Are we focusing too much on extrinsic motivations? Are badges another crude way to “gamify” education? Should we be concerned that Arne Duncan thinks badges are a “game-changer”?

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Formal ed vs. DIY – Part 6: Badges - K12 Open Ed

Formal ed vs. DIY – Part 6: Badges - K12 Open Ed | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

Badges are digital emblems or symbols of skills, achievements, interests or affiliations. Badges can be aligned with assessments, like those mentioned in the last post, to provide meaningful evidence of learning that can be carried with a learner to demonstrate their skills. Badges can support innovation in assessment and be awarded for a much deeper and wider set of skills and achievements, including the often neglected social skills like collaboration and teamwork, and thus one’s collection of badges can tell a much more comprehensive story to potential employers, formal institutions and peer communities.

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Badges - MozillaWiki

Badges - MozillaWiki | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

Today's learning happens everywhere. Not just in the classroom. But it's often difficult to get recognition for the skills you acquire online or outside of traditional school. Mozilla's Open Badges projectis working to solve that problem, making it easy for anyone to issue, earn and display badges across the web. The result: badges can help today's learners display 21st century skills, unlock career and educational opportunities, and level up in their life and work.

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digital digs: Welcome to Badge World

Perhaps one might find the notion of open badges appealing. Open meaning what? Anyone can open their own diploma mill, err I mean badge-selling operation? Of course not. Badges would have to be accredited by someone. Not sure who, but I doubt getting that accreditation will be free. How could it be? What open means is market-driven. Badges will have monetary value. People want them as a route toward getting jobs. They will pay for them the same way they pay now for college credits. When we look at all the free, DIY learning that is out there now, it's free precisely because it hasn't been commodified.

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Valary Oleinik's curator insight, March 6, 2014 1:08 PM

Gamification and badging may be all the rage these days but it is useful to looking at the "dark" side of badging. Why are we really doing it. What will it really accomplish. I think it is new and novel right now and maybe hasn't really found its way, but it is trying to solve some issues that we need a solution for. How do we record our accomplishments past higher education? We list memberships and awards on resumes but don't always have a way to show that we have the skills and motivation to move our careers and lives in new directions.

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Badges and Assessment (part 1) | Coordinating Curation

I’ve come on board to work on two projects, the first to help develop a badge backpack, and the second is to work with Philipp Schmidt and the Peer-2-Peer University (P2PU) to experiment with peer-based educational assessment and recognition. The relationship between the two projects is simple: some peer-based assessments on P2PU will result in students being given digital badges; these badges will then get stored in a digital backpack.

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Google News Adds Badges, Gamification: Hit or Miss? | Badgeville Blog: On Gamification, Analytics and Loyalty

Google News Adds Badges, Gamification: Hit or Miss? | Badgeville Blog: On Gamification, Analytics and Loyalty | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

While it is exciting to see Google investing in game mechanics, their badge program is far from perfect. But before I get around to picking apart what they’ve done wrong, let’s review what works. It is exciting to see Google investing in game mechanics and gamification. Their badges are nice, and the ability to add new stars to each category badge helps streamline the interface -especially considering how many thousands badges there would be if each level-up needed a separate badge.

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Notes on and concerns about this year's Digital Media & Learning Competition

Why badges instead of the host of other extrinsic motivators that could be embraced? What proof is there that badges have led to more, better, or different learning? What proof is there that potential employers will give a damn about what badges an applicant has “earned”?

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About Mozilla Badges

About Mozilla Badges | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

I believe that Mozilla’s Badges has the potential to be an important development. At a minimum, it could provide a way to accredit (recognize is perhaps a better term) non-formal or informal learning activities. But I have so many questions about this project, starting with ‘why?’ and ‘who?’. The why stems from the contradiction between informal learning and assessment (however it is done). Isn’t the point of informal learning is that it IS informal and it’s the informal learner herself who makes her own assessment of its value? (I suppose there’s nothing to stop learners issuing their own badges, of course)

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#DMLBadges and Shifting the Overton Window on Learning

#DMLBadges and Shifting the Overton Window on Learning | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

What I see in the conversation about badges, regardless of how that particular line of work will play out, is a shift in the Overton Window on learning, a shift in the boundaries of the debate, especially in terms of people in positions of power now talking in new ways. In ways that acknowledge all those spaces that kids spend time in out of school as a valid learning environments. In ways that validate practices and processes that school rarely is incentivized to foster – practices that are collaborative, creative, critical, and often civic in their nature.

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Thoughts on Badges for Learning

Thoughts on Badges for Learning | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

This year’s competition focuses on Badges for Learning, which seems inspired in part by Mozilla’s Open Badge initiatives and P2PU. I fully admit to spending most of my time on the backchannel really trying to understand where the faith in badges as tool for fixing issues with education comes from. Is it based on anecdotal evidence from places like P2PU and Khan Academy? From gaming influences? Specifically, I wondered about the empirical evidence or theoretical basis for this interest: had someone done this well on a small scale? Is this rooted in research on performance assessment or motivation?

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'Certification' Revisited | Erin Knight

There are so many important skills and competencies, some age-old and some new(ish) in today’s world, that are not currently captured or acknowledged. Things like the often referenced 21st Century Skills, or New Media Literacies, which cover everything from information organization and evaluation, to negotiation and trial-and-error prototyping. Or the “soft” skills like critical thinking and teamwork.

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Open Badges, Assessment, and Open Education | Pontydysgu: Educational Research

Open Badges, Assessment, and Open Education | Pontydysgu: Educational Research | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

Now some of the issues. I am still concerned of attempts to establish taxonomies, be it those of hierarchy in terms of award structures or those of different forms of ability / competence / skill (pick your own terminology). Such undertakings have bedeviled attempts to introduce new forms of recognition and I worry that those coming more from the educational technology world may not realise the pitfalls of taxonomies and levels.

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Digging Out My Sash | Bud the Teacher

But, if the DML competition encourages thinking and writing and exploration and action around ideas like the idea that any accountability system, or accreditation system, is ultimately a subjective system, made by people, however we design it, then I say, let’s rock. But let’s do so carefully.

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Why Badges? Why Not? | HASTAC

Why Badges? Why Not? | HASTAC | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

Our current, standardized systems of credentialing are very rigid and often restrictive. Badges allow groups of people—organizations and institutions--to decide what counts for them and how they want to give credit. Every contribution isn’t measured by ABCD. If you contribute, you can have a record of that contribution. That’s the beauty of digital badge systems or eportfolios such as Top Coders where you can actually click on the badge and see all the specific contributions or skills of a person that were recognized by peers in the form of a badge. A badge is a visual symbol. In the best online badging systems, that emblem then opens up a full array of contribution.

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Master a new skill? Here's your badge - O'Reilly Radar

Master a new skill? Here's your badge - O'Reilly Radar | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

How did the Open Badges project come about? At the core, it's really just a general acknowledgement that learning looks very different today than traditionally imagined. Legitimate and interest-driven learning is occurring through a multitude of channels outside of formal education, and yet much of that learning does not "count" in today's world. There is no real way to demonstrate that learning and transfer it across contexts or use it for real results. We feel this is where badges can come in — they can provide evidence of learning, regardless of where it occurs or what it involves, and give learners tangible recognition for their skills, achievements, interests and affiliations that they can carry with them and share with key stakeholders, such as potential employers, formal institutions or peer communities.

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Open Badges and the Impact of Potential Employees

Open Badges and the Impact of Potential Employees | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

Based on some feedback I am getting on my post on Open Badges and Rewarding Learning Online, I got to thinking a bit more on how this could be expanded/revisited to suit the professional sector.

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Why Badges Work Better Than Grades | HASTAC

Why Badges Work Better Than Grades | HASTAC | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

What are badges? First, a badge is a recognized visual (physical or virtual) device or ornament or (heaven forbid!) piece of jewelry that typically designates in its design the symbol, insignia, colors, or name of the organization conferring it. That's important. That is, the very design of the badge acknolwedges the issuing body or community that has, collectively, agreed upon what counts as the minimum requirement for the badge.

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Assessment, Youth Culture, Games & Learning | DMLcentral

Assessment, Youth Culture, Games & Learning | DMLcentral | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

Do we need badges, specifically badges for learning? In recent years, the answer has been increasingly, if not exactly “yes” then something more like “we better find out before it’s too late.” The new interest around badges appears to have begun in response to a talk by Eva L. Baker, "The End(s) of Testing," her 2007 Presidential Address for the American Educational Research Association. Critiquing assessment within schools, she never actually used the term “badges” but rather, “qualifications.”

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Badges in Social Media: A Social Psychological Perspective

Badges in Social Media: A Social Psychological Perspective | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

Representing achievements as badges or trophies is a standard practice in online gaming. Awarding badges has also become a key ingredient in “gamifying” online social media experiences. Social systems such as Foursquare, StackOverflow, and Wikipedia have popularized badges as a way of engaging and motivating users. In this paper we deconstruct badges and present five social psychological functions for badges in social media contexts: goal setting, instruction, reputation, status/affirmation, and group identification. We argue that future research should further explore these five functions and their application in specific contexts.

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