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Badges for Lifelong Learning
Supported by the MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Initiative
Curated by HASTAC
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The Open Badges Resume: The Most Prestigious Badges You Can Earn - Online College.org

The Open Badges Resume: The Most Prestigious Badges You Can Earn - Online College.org | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it
Even though badges are still in their infancy, a class of them have emerged that will make employers and admissions counselors take notice.
DML Competition's insight:

Online Colleges looks at the potential for badges to influence employment. 

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Can Badges Fix Developer Recruitment? | Regular Geek

Can Badges Fix Developer Recruitment? |  Regular Geek | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

(Don't forget StackOverflow's Careers 2.0) Lately, more services have appeared with the hope of showing who has experience with various technologies. The idea is meant to solve two problems. First, influence is a hot topic right now, with people focusing more on general influence and sites like Klout or PeerIndex. How do you find people that know about things like HTML5 or JavaScript and JQuery? Outside of the people that wrote a book or wrote the framework, how do you find those people that are truly knowledgable? The second problem is the recruitment and hiring process. In the technical industry, recruitment and hiring is big business. Given the amount of turnover in the industry, those recruiting fees can really add up. In many cases, companies need to pay as much as 10% of the starting salary for the new employee to the recruitment firm. If the average placement makes $100,000, that means the recruitment firm takes $10,000 per position.

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Q: Are badges motivating? A: Yes, no, and it depends (via StackOverflow)

We like other people to admire us. As geeks we like others to admire us for our skills. Badges/achievements stay visible in association with our online identity long-term, unlike individual good questions & answers which quickly fade into obscurity.

If I play a game and get a great score, it's nice, but it means little to others unless they have the context of what typical scores are for that game (and difficulty level etc.) Whereas an achievement is a little more compact of a summary of what you've accomplished.

 

Badges also give us a checklist whereby we can see how far we've come since we joined the web site -- and how far we have to go in order to be average, or to be exceptional.

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Coding Horror: The Gamification

Coding Horror: The Gamification | Badges for Lifelong Learning | Scoop.it

For programmers, everything we know is pretty much guaranteed to be obsolete in 10 years if we're lucky, and 5 years if we aren't. It's changing all the time. The field of programming is almost by definition one of constant learning. Programming is supposed to be fun – and it is, if you're doing it right. Nobody taught me that better than the Beagle Bros on my Apple II. Why can't learning in every other subject matter be just as enjoyable?

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