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Why we love repetition in music – Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis – Aeon

Why we love repetition in music – Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis – Aeon | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Why do we listen to our favourite music over and over again? Because repeated sounds work magic in our brains
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is a fabulous article and includes some simple experiments that are really quite eye - or should I say ear opening.  Building on the idea that repetition is fundamental to how we experience music, the author weaves a compelling story that most will find really interesting and insightful.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, March 19, 11:27 AM

So true!

Angie Mc's curator insight, March 19, 11:45 AM

Fascinating article! Yet one more reason to include music in family life.

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How Music Can Improve Your Life and Create Flow
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How Playing Music Affects The Developing Brain

How Playing Music Affects The Developing Brain | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Researchers in the burgeoning field of music neuroscience discuss the effects of music on brain development.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Quite a long read but the key takeaways are:

- Having music in schools raises test scores

- Music training has a positive effect on the brain's executive function

- Music training increase brain plasticity

- Music can predict a child's literacy (fantastic tool and cheap!)

- music neuroscience faces the same funding problems as music in the classroom does

Well worth a read!

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The Romantic Power of Music

The Romantic Power of Music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Recent studies show that musical ability might be a sexually selected trait.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Aside from all the cognitive benefits of getting your kid into music classes early - here's another reason - chicks will dig them (and guys too!)  Well written article that looks at the first real rock star - Franz Lizt and examines why people go crazy around this kind of musical genius.  The consensus seems to be that if you can play your instrument at an exceptional level then you pretty much have your shit down - this is kind of like Douglas Adams Hitchhiker's towel.  

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A Musical Mission To Improve The Lives Of Elders With Dementia - NBC News

A Musical Mission To Improve The Lives Of Elders With Dementia - NBC News | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Alive Inside In the beginning, filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett had planned on following Dan Cohen for just one day. Cohen, a social worker and founder of t...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

The conversation on how music can help the elderly is picking up steam - the famous Henry Alzheimer's video which was published back in 2011 now has 1.5 million views.  This is an interview with a filmmaker who's documentary "Alive inside" highlights how music can have a huge impact on the lives of those with dementia.  It's insightful and touching - well worth a read. 

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To cut down on sugar just change the background music - Telegraph

To cut down on sugar just change the background music - Telegraph | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Playing 'sweet' sounding music over dinner could allow you to lower the amount of sugar in food without changing the taste in a phenomenon dubbed 'sonic seasoning' by experimental psychologists at Oxford University
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Really interesting idea but with fairly anecdotal and small study evidence.  But the promise of  making a dish seem 10% more sweet or sour just by altering the audio environment does open a lot of doors.  While there is definitely opportunity here - I'm a little suspicious of the wine pairings at the end of the article - a fun read!

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To The Beat And Sound - The Sport In Mind – Sport Psychology

To The Beat And Sound - The Sport In Mind – Sport Psychology | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Some nice data here backed with research - the big takeaways are the use of music to either psych the athlete up - or to calm them down - clear evidence that the right playlist can achieve both ends.  interesting data on German soccer players improving their motor skills when listening to  music of a set rhythm - hopefully they won't be wearing them when they face theUSAon Tuesday! 

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Brain Research Shows Direct Connection Between Music Study and Cognitive Growth | The Royal Conservatory of Music

Brain Research Shows Direct Connection Between Music Study and Cognitive Growth | The Royal Conservatory of Music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Strong stuff from the Canadian Royal Conservatory of Music.  Having compiled a number of studies over the last decade they're making the statement that the neuroscience is now proving that music has tangible benefits.  Parent's might want to consider the opening paragraph:

 

"... neuroscience research has been proving that music education fast-tracks speech and reading skills, trains children to focus their attention for sustained periods, and helps them to develop emotional intelligence, among many other lifelong benefits."

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Chuck Kelly's curator insight, June 12, 8:20 AM

Another artilce that shows the affect of music and the brain, explaining the usefulness of learning about music. 

Andy Nanton's curator insight, July 20, 12:58 PM

This source shows how the brain when stimulated by music shows increased information processing and motor coordination, and helps to create stronger neural connections in the brain which contribute to improved structure and function through a process called neuroplasticity.

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Singing For Their Supper: How Music Can Improve Performance in the Workplace

Singing For Their Supper: How Music Can Improve Performance in the Workplace | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Song Division believes composing a tune can lead to improved performance in the workplace. Since 2003, the company’s ensemble of professional
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I used to go on corporate management training courses and weekends and we never had a massive sing song - well - unless I was at the piano at the end of the night!  I love this as it is more evidence of the utility of music - can you imagine this taking place in corporate offices in the 90's?  

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Science Explains Why We Listen to Music That Scares Us to Death

Science Explains Why We Listen to Music That Scares Us to Death | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Thanks to evolution, some of us actually enjoyed listening to heavy metal, horrorcore, and 'Yeezus'.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Really well written article, the idea that your visual sense decreases at night so the auditory sense takes over as primary predator detector is a great insight to how sounds can be really scary.  Well worth a read.

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Live Music May Help Premature Babies, Study Says

Live Music May Help Premature Babies, Study Says | Music to work to | Scoop.it
The sounds of live music confer health benefits on the tiniest and most vulnerable people—premature babies who are being treated in the neonatal intensive care unit, a new study says.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

It's all babies and pregnancy this week!  here's a study from 2013 published in the journal Pediatrics that looked at how music can deliver significant benefits to premature babies.  A decent study size of 272 premature infants used three different mechanisms:  recorded ocean sound, finger drumming on a Gato box and singing from the babies' parents.   All three groups saw benefits from the music although the singing groups showed the greatest increase in activity or alertness.  Bottom line - the data suggests that this is an effective tool to help the development of premature babies.

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Listening To Music Helps Women Get Through Labour

Listening To Music Helps Women Get Through Labour | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I'd never heard of a "labour playlist" before - but I guess I'm not surprised.  music seems to become more utilitarian every day and there's plenty of evidence of its ability to ameliorate pain, so why not.  Although I did giggle at the last comment from a mother who said she can't now listen to Adele without thinking of Birth!  As the author says - you might want be careful what you put on your list!

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The shared pathways of music and language - University of Liverpool News

The shared pathways of music and language - University of Liverpool News | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Liverpool found musical training can increase blood flow in the left hemisphere of the brain, suggesting the area of the brain responsible for music and language share common pathways.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

It's a super small study - so let's back off the big statements - but there's evidence that a small amount of music training can increase the amount of blood flow to the left hemisphere.  This is the whole music and language debate and would seem to indicate that there is indeed a strong relationship between the two.  

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Professional Musicians Face Greater Risk of Hearing Problems --Doctors Lounge

Professional Musicians Face Greater Risk of Hearing Problems --Doctors Lounge | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Another one to file under Duh!  My initial reaction was really/  What's the sample size - but I guess you can't argue with a control data set of 3 million Germans between 16 an 99 - 2,227 of which were professional musicians.  Of course - there are thousands of ways you can be a musician - but inevitably - if you are sitting in a group playing music loudly enough for others to hear - then your ears are going to take more of a beating than non-musicians. 

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Is music really all about sex?

Is music really all about sex? | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Charles Darwin argued that music evolved as a way to attract lovers, and a study claims to support his idea. But how strong is the evidence, asks Phil Ball.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Really cool article from Phillip Ball on the BBC website. The minute you throw sex into the ring you can guarantee a million headlines but this article thoughtfully and entertainingly takes you through the relevant history and data points.

 

if you've got a few minutes it is well worth a read!

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Think Before You Clap: You Could Be Beat Deaf

Think Before You Clap: You Could Be Beat Deaf | Music to work to | Scoop.it
People who can't clap on the beat drive comedian Aaron Michael King crazy, especially one group in particular. He devoted a whole YouTube sketc
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Had never heard of Beat Deafness before but it certainly makes sense.  The article starts a little tongue in cheek with the old chestnut that white people don't have rhythm but then actually gets to the science.  Interestingly enough even the guy who is supposed to be beat deaf can actually keep in time with a basic metronome.

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10 Pieces Of Music Created With Brainwaves | The Creators Project

10 Pieces Of Music Created With Brainwaves | The Creators Project | Music to work to | Scoop.it
These tech-aided, brainwave-created music experiments bring a new meaning to "straight off the dome."
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

it's fascinating to see certain paths develop in this opaque world that is music and human beings and psychology and neuroscience.  There's a been a trend in recent years of people taking obscure data sets such as galaxy clusters or road layouts and turning that data into music.  Which is kinda cool but it's not really that "interesting" to me 'cos the music created is filtered through whatever the programmers add as the sounds to be manipulated by the data set - so it's kinda interesting but never sounds very good.

 

What we have here is the same concept of souhnd being generated - but the data set is waaaay more interesting.  Instead of gathering discrete data points and feeding them in to a program - brainwaves are picked up by EEG and fed into the sound generator in real time - in one example the sound generator is live musicians reacting to a score being created on the fly - which is pretty gnarly if you think about it.

 

There are 10 different examples and a few of them actually sound pretty good - of course a few others sound like cats screeching - but hey - progress is being made! 

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Pop music is making us depressed. But there’s a happy pill for that

Pop music is making us depressed. But there’s a happy pill for that | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Why are we so depressed? Well, that would require a book, but science show us our popular music is part of the problem.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Hysterically funny love letter to Hayley Williams of Paramore wrapped in a smattering of relevant research mixed with a healthy contempt for today's plastic pop stars - definitely worth a read!

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Finding ‘Flow’ | Empower2Perform

Finding ‘Flow’ | Empower2Perform | Music to work to | Scoop.it

Have you ever felt that nothing seems to matter when you’re engaged in your activity and experiencing peak performance? You’re on ‘autopilot’ or you’re ‘in the zone?’ Perhaps you’ve heard others say they’re ‘at one with the music?’ Any idea what it all means, how you feel, and...

Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Great introduction to the idea of Flow and how you can get there more quickly.  Not necessarily music specific - but the use of music to work to can enhance your transition into a flow state more easily! 

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New Study Shows We're Listening to Exactly the Wrong Music at Work

New Study Shows We're Listening to Exactly the Wrong Music at Work | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Turns out Adele is to blame for our employment problems.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Nice to see Anneli working with Spotify - more grist to the mill for the utility of music and its role in helping people become more productive

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Sugar Bear Trio's curator insight, June 13, 11:22 AM

This is a real problem. America would be more productive with happier employees.! #musicforwork.

 

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Music Therapy Science - NeuroRhythm Music Therapy, Colorado Springs, CO 80906

Music Therapy Science - NeuroRhythm Music Therapy, Colorado Springs, CO 80906 | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is actually kind of cool - mouse over the area of the brain and the page shows you what that area does - what brain areas deal with it - how music is processed by it and how music can help.  Nice introduction!

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Chuck Kelly's curator insight, June 12, 8:29 AM
Interactive Map of the Brain. This is background on which parts of the brain does what. 
Andy Nanton's curator insight, July 20, 12:50 PM

This source shows how music therapy can enable those without language to communicate and express themselves. It's a great source that helps give consciousness on the effect music has from a medical perspective.  

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Spiders know the meaning of web music | Science Codex

Spiders know the meaning of web music | Science Codex | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Spider silk transmits vibrations across a wide range of frequencies so that, when plucked like a guitar string, its sound carries information about prey, mates, and even the structural integrity of a web.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

It's studies like these that make me stop and wonder just what music can do - the idea that a spider can make sense of its environment by measuring frequency vibration has me thinking of just how much information music is delivering at a sub conscious level.  Ultimately though - I want a piano with strings made from spider silk - imagine that!!!

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Name that tune! Scientists find part of brain that recognises music

Name that tune! Scientists find part of brain that recognises music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Iowa researchers discovered the same area responsible for remembering names and and landmarks, left temporal lobe, also deals with music.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Another study that looks at the music / language relationship - not really earth shattering but does throw some light on how the brain names things.  We know that the left temporal lobe is the area that attaches names to things like faces and landmarks - and we know that these are visual stimuli - this study showed that the same area is responsible for naming auditory stimuli.  So - people with damaged left temporal lobes - although they can remember a song - they struggle with remembering its name.  The inter3esting study will be when they look at right temporal lobe deficiencies and see if the subjects can't even identify the melody.

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Christopher Coleman's curator insight, June 4, 1:09 PM

So keep that left temporal lobe healthy, people!

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Pregnant women 'much more receptive to effects of music'

Pregnant women 'much more receptive to effects of music' | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Compared with non-pregnant women, pregnant women rate music as more pleasant and unpleasant, and show greater changes in blood pressure while listening to music.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Following yesterday's article about music playlists during child labor, Marie Ellis at Medical News Today looks at how women experience music throughout their pregnancy.  It seems that they have a much stronger reaction to music than non pregnant women leading the researcher to hypothesize that fetuses are conditioned to perceive music while still in the womb.  Interesting stuff! 

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Heavy-metal music is a surprising indicator of countries’ economic health

Heavy-metal music is a surprising indicator of countries’ economic health | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Popular music styles are often closely connected to the social situations where they first began. Rock 'n' roll grew out of the heady culture of American cities following the Great Migration and World War II, as formerly rural blacks brought rapidly evolving jazz and rhythm and blues into cities. Decades later, the disinvested inner cities...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

" Though metal may be the music of choice for some alienated working-class males, it enjoys its greatest popularity in the most advanced, most tolerant, and knowledge-based places in the world."

 

Super interesting article that looks at the relationship between the number of heavy metal bands and the socioeconomic status of the population!  

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Listen while you work: What music does to your brain

Listen while you work: What music does to your brain | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

There seem to be a few of these kind of posts out there at the moment - thought leaders who are taking the time out to write about how music affects you and what kinds of music to listen to while you work.  I like this one by Mikael Cho as he is interested in music that helps you create a state of flow - something that we are big believers in here at music2work2.  If you're looking for a good overview of the whole music to work to idea - then this is a good article to start with.

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How music affects your productivity

How music affects your productivity | Music to work to | Scoop.it
The sweet science of sound! Music has a noticeable impact on productivity and creative thinking.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Solid post from Gregory Ciotti, nicely structured with links out to relevant studies from most of the usual suspects.  I like how he breaks it down by task and environment and then looks at the different types of music with links out to YouTube examples.  A great primer on music to work to.

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