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Music Makes the Tips Grow Larger

Music Makes the Tips Grow Larger | Music to work to | Scoop.it
New research from France finds restaurant patrons exposed to music with pro-social lyrics are more likely to leave tips.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Although there's no indication of sample size and there are so many variables unaccounted for it doesn't feel terribly "scientific" -   the results are intriguing!  It makes sense that feel good music will make people feel good, and the better you feel the more generous you feel - but the idea that pro social songs can raise wait staff's income by 8% is pretty cool!

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How Music Can Improve Your Life and Create Flow
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Why do we love the music we heard as teenagers? - Bubblews

Why do we love the music we heard as teenagers? - Bubblews | Music to work to | Scoop.it
As I plod through my 20s, I’ve noticed a strange phenomenon: The music I loved as a teenager means more to me than ever—but with each passing year...
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Well thought out and presented article that looks at the neuroscience and psychology behind our attachment to the songs from our youth.  If you've ever wondered why certain tracks stay with you after all these years - have a read - well worth it!

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Bouncing to the Beatles Breeds Benevolent Babies

Bouncing to the Beatles Breeds Benevolent Babies | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Canadian researchers find synchronized movement to music can inspire altruism in 14-month-old infants.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I love this study - researchers showed that children as young as 14 months can be influenced to exhibit spontaneous helping behavior if they have previously engaged in synchronous behavior with the object of their assistance!  read the article for the details but the takeaway for me is that it isn't necessarily about music - the researchers reckoned that music probably wasn't necessary - what was necessary was the movement and visual recognition that another human being was moving in the same way as them.  What music was doing here was to deliver the auditory cues on when to move - and that for me is a huge insight into how music affects us.  It's often not that music has some special magic that makes things happen - it's that music is so prevalent and we're so used to acting on its inherent nature (i.e rhythm, beat, melody, mood, bass lines) that its our actions that are the cause but we attribute them to music.  

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This Music Will Make You Feel Invincible

This Music Will Make You Feel Invincible | Music to work to | Scoop.it
By Tom Jacobs

As its recent reincarnation on Broadway reminded us, you can’t separate Rocky from its music. It’s easy to believe the lovable underdog boxer could be a champion, so long as that rousing, brass-heavy score is roaring as...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This one has been making the rounds this week for obvious reasons.  If just listening to music can make you feel and act more powerful then that's pretty good information to have.  the study isolated the driver to be heavy bass beats in the tracks which has certainly been a major growth area in popular music over the last decade or so.  Nothing terribly new here - athletes and competitors of all kinds have used music to pump themselves up before an event - it's just interesting to see that one specific aspect of the music - the bass - can have such an impact.

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Listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons

Listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Distraction is an effective pain reliever, and a new study concludes that listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons who can easily become absorbed in cognitive activities.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Interesting study with decent sample size of 145 subjects that experienced controlled pain while focusing on music.   The idea is that music helps reduce pain because it activates sensory pathways that compete with the pain pathways and the data seems to back this up.  What was super interesting was that they got the participants to rank their anxiety about the pain before hand and had hypothesized that those with high anxiety with the pain would be least affected by the music.  Turns out the opposite - apparently the more anxious you are about the pain - the more likely it is that the music will have a positive and soothing effect. 

 

Image credit: Quinn Dombrowski - Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/5151278314

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Practice may not make perfect

Practice may not make perfect | Music to work to | Scoop.it
TO MASTER the violin takes 10,000 hours of practice. Put in that time and expertise will follow. This, at least, is what many music teachers—following Malcolm...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I like this article - not least because the dataset involved over a thousand twins!  Bottom line - no amount of practicing is going to turn you into a pro unless you have a genetic predisposition.  So - sorry to all the people out there who tell their kids "You can do anything you want if you just try hard enough." yes it's a nice sentiment but the real world doesn't work that way.  It reminds me of student athletes who are promised they could play in the pros one day but whose parents gifted them a smaller frame than their competition.  It doesn't matter how hard you work - if you're 8 inches shorter than the other guy - it's going to be tough!

 

Image Credit: Manly Football on Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/photos/manlyfootball/6834097295

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Study finds that snowboarders listening to music have less injuries

Study finds that snowboarders listening to music have less injuries | Music to work to | Scoop.it
The British Journal of Sports Medicine has published a study that finds snowboarders who listen to music on a personal music player have less injuries then snowboarders who do not listen to music. ...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is brilliant - seems that if you listen to music while you're snowboarding you're less likely to have an accident.  However, the data does come with the caveat that if you do have an accident while listening to music - it's more likely to be significant and end up with a trip to the ER instead of being handled by the snow patrol on the hill.

 

It reminds me of driving behavior inGermanyback in the day - accidents were pretty infrequent, as most people obeyed the traffic laws, however - when there was an accident it was generally pretty horrendous due to the unlimited speeds allowed on the autobahn.

 

The takeaway for me is the whole idea that music can encourage and facilitate the development of a state of flow.  That place where you're not really thinking about what you're doing - you're just in the zone and performing effortlessly.  So for our snowboarders they make less mistakes and have less accidents.  the down side could potentially be that they start testing the limits of their ability - resulting in the big accidents that send them off to the ER.

 

Ah well - no pain - no gain!!!  ;-p 

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They're Using Our Biology Against Us? Movie Makers Are Evil Geniuses!

They're Using Our Biology Against Us? Movie Makers Are Evil Geniuses! | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Why do movie soundtracks affect us? Film makers are using our own biological responses against us.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Short primer on how composers use music to manipulate emotions in the movie world.  Although we're all familiar with the sounds of Jaws and the shower scene from Psycho - its the infrasounds used in Paranormal Activity - those deep frequencies that we can't hear but feel - that really - that I think are really interesting!

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Does listening to music improve productivity? Here's 8 compelling reasons why it does

Does listening to music improve productivity? Here's 8 compelling reasons why it does | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Does listening to music improve productivity? Here's several studies and research that proves why it does.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

It's funny - when we sat down 9 years ago and wrote the business plan for music2work2 we knew that one of the indicators of success would be the arrival of articles that talk about how music can help productivity.  It always puts a smile on my face to read pieces like this.  If you're struggling with someone who says music doesn't have an effect - get them to read this.  but remember - it is all subjective - and even though these studies show a benefit - there are plenty of people for whom music is a terrible distraction - whether its instrumental or not!

 

#musictoworkto

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How Playing Music Affects The Developing Brain

How Playing Music Affects The Developing Brain | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Researchers in the burgeoning field of music neuroscience discuss the effects of music on brain development.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Quite a long read but the key takeaways are:

- Having music in schools raises test scores

- Music training has a positive effect on the brain's executive function

- Music training increase brain plasticity

- Music can predict a child's literacy (fantastic tool and cheap!)

- music neuroscience faces the same funding problems as music in the classroom does

Well worth a read!

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The Romantic Power of Music

The Romantic Power of Music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Recent studies show that musical ability might be a sexually selected trait.
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Aside from all the cognitive benefits of getting your kid into music classes early - here's another reason - chicks will dig them (and guys too!)  Well written article that looks at the first real rock star - Franz Lizt and examines why people go crazy around this kind of musical genius.  The consensus seems to be that if you can play your instrument at an exceptional level then you pretty much have your shit down - this is kind of like Douglas Adams Hitchhiker's towel.  

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A Musical Mission To Improve The Lives Of Elders With Dementia - NBC News

A Musical Mission To Improve The Lives Of Elders With Dementia - NBC News | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Alive Inside In the beginning, filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett had planned on following Dan Cohen for just one day. Cohen, a social worker and founder of t...
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The conversation on how music can help the elderly is picking up steam - the famous Henry Alzheimer's video which was published back in 2011 now has 1.5 million views.  This is an interview with a filmmaker who's documentary "Alive inside" highlights how music can have a huge impact on the lives of those with dementia.  It's insightful and touching - well worth a read. 

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To cut down on sugar just change the background music - Telegraph

To cut down on sugar just change the background music - Telegraph | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Playing 'sweet' sounding music over dinner could allow you to lower the amount of sugar in food without changing the taste in a phenomenon dubbed 'sonic seasoning' by experimental psychologists at Oxford University
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Really interesting idea but with fairly anecdotal and small study evidence.  But the promise of  making a dish seem 10% more sweet or sour just by altering the audio environment does open a lot of doors.  While there is definitely opportunity here - I'm a little suspicious of the wine pairings at the end of the article - a fun read!

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To The Beat And Sound - The Sport In Mind – Sport Psychology

To The Beat And Sound - The Sport In Mind – Sport Psychology | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Some nice data here backed with research - the big takeaways are the use of music to either psych the athlete up - or to calm them down - clear evidence that the right playlist can achieve both ends.  interesting data on German soccer players improving their motor skills when listening to  music of a set rhythm - hopefully they won't be wearing them when they face theUSAon Tuesday! 

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Mozart as Medicine: The Health Benefits of Music

Mozart as Medicine: The Health Benefits of Music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Learn about the health benefits of music and how to use music therapy to relieve stress, reduce pain, and improve your health.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Long but well put together article that looks at the current research on music therapy.  The main takeaway is that the majority of studies are flawed and don't really define how the clear benefits associated with music therapy are attributed.  More research is needed - but there is the final point - that undoubtedly music does have a positive benefit and unlike all the pills and other procedures - there are no negative side effects!

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5 Ways to Incorporate Music into the Workplace

5 Ways to Incorporate Music into the Workplace | Music to work to | Scoop.it
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Nice overview on music in the workplace - complete with some listening recommendations - The Simcity 4 soundtrack is a favorite for many knowledge workers

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Relaxation Techniques for Migraines and Headaches

Relaxation Techniques for Migraines and Headaches | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Learning relaxation techniques is an important part of migraine and headache relief. Read these tips.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Headaches are horrible and dealing with them can be a nightmare.  This article looks at relaxation techniques which have been shown to help people suffering from headaches and migraines.  One of the recommendations is to use calming music in the background - which makes sense so long as it isn't "loud" music!  Some music2work2 would be perfect for this.

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How music prevents organ rejection

How music prevents organ rejection | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Music has a fundamental affect on humans. It can reduce stress, enhance relaxation, provide a distraction from pain, and improve the results of clinical therapy.

 

MUSIC: http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=music

 


Via Sakis Koukouvis
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

research from Japan on Mice - the only thing you need to know is this:


"They found that opera and classical music both increased the time before the transplanted organs failed, but single frequency monotones and new age music did not."


take that Yanni!


;-p

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Prolonged Exposure to Loud Noise Alters Speech Processing

Prolonged Exposure to Loud Noise Alters Speech Processing | Music to work to | Scoop.it
New research suggests exposure to loud sounds like emergency vehicle sirens... even high volume from an mp3 player... may be damaging the brain as well as the ears.

15 percent of Americans betwee...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Should be required reading for all teenagers (and anybody for that matter) who live with their earbuds in.  We knew about high volumes damaging the hair cells (although I hadn't realized it was permanent) but this study would indicate that the damage is also replicated ins the auditory cortex - which will affect how you process speech and conversation.  The big takeaway - be careful with your volume - I really do suspect that there's going to be a whole generation that is hard of hearing later on in life!

 

Image Credit: Mikey GOttawaon Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeygottawa/374910126

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Not Just for Music: Drumming Is Therapy, Too

Not Just for Music: Drumming Is Therapy, Too | Music to work to | Scoop.it
A growing body of research shows that drumming has a positive effect on Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, depression, PTSD, and more.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

When you look at the list of benefits as identified by scientific studies it just makes you wonder why more people aren't shouting about this.  Improved T cell counts, helping Alzheimer patients, reducing drop out rates and even reversing genetic responses to stress!  I wonder if it's just cultural - the idea that a drum circle is typically populated by 60's throwbacks and the whole hippie thing that keeps people from actively attending or doing something with this information.  I guess we're going to need even more studies before people are convinced.

 

#musictoworkto

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Running to the beat of your own music

Running to the beat of your own music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
One-hundred and seventy beats per minute. That's the song tempo Nate Hammond wants to hear while on a shorter, faster run.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Studies over the years have show the clear benefits that music can bring to runners - I particularly remember the one quoted that shows that music can reduce the perception of exertion by 10% and that synchronizing movements to the beat can increase performance by 15%.  Who wouldn't want to get that benefit?

 

It's going to make runners at least more aware of the tempo of tracks and as the article says move people more into the techno and hip hop worlds!

 

#musictoworkto  #musictorunto  #music2run2

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EyeMusic brings music to our eyes | Health

EyeMusic brings music to our eyes | Health | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Reading this yesterday I immediately thought of that of that "terrific!" Ben Affleck Superhero movie - DareDevil - the one where he "sees" the world through visual radar - being able to use sound to bounce waves off objects and then interpret them kinda like a submarine!

 

This is not the case!  the point behind this article is the idea that the visual cortex isn't really about vision - and that if you train a blind person to read using touch with Braille, they use the same visual cortex as a seeing person.

 

What they're doing here is using sound to represent what the world looks like - not radar or sonar - but actually creating auditory signals such as upward swoops to represent smiles.  Apparently after just 30 minutes instruction, a blind person can identify a series of different shapes.

 

It's all pretty interesting and insightful when it comes to how the visual cortex isn't just about sight - but I'm not sure about the wider world applicability.  

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Think Before You Clap: You Could Be Beat Deaf

Think Before You Clap: You Could Be Beat Deaf | Music to work to | Scoop.it
People who can't clap on the beat drive comedian Aaron Michael King crazy, especially one group in particular. He devoted a whole YouTube sketc
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Had never heard of Beat Deafness before but it certainly makes sense.  The article starts a little tongue in cheek with the old chestnut that white people don't have rhythm but then actually gets to the science.  Interestingly enough even the guy who is supposed to be beat deaf can actually keep in time with a basic metronome.

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10 Pieces Of Music Created With Brainwaves | The Creators Project

10 Pieces Of Music Created With Brainwaves | The Creators Project | Music to work to | Scoop.it
These tech-aided, brainwave-created music experiments bring a new meaning to "straight off the dome."
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

it's fascinating to see certain paths develop in this opaque world that is music and human beings and psychology and neuroscience.  There's a been a trend in recent years of people taking obscure data sets such as galaxy clusters or road layouts and turning that data into music.  Which is kinda cool but it's not really that "interesting" to me 'cos the music created is filtered through whatever the programmers add as the sounds to be manipulated by the data set - so it's kinda interesting but never sounds very good.

 

What we have here is the same concept of souhnd being generated - but the data set is waaaay more interesting.  Instead of gathering discrete data points and feeding them in to a program - brainwaves are picked up by EEG and fed into the sound generator in real time - in one example the sound generator is live musicians reacting to a score being created on the fly - which is pretty gnarly if you think about it.

 

There are 10 different examples and a few of them actually sound pretty good - of course a few others sound like cats screeching - but hey - progress is being made! 

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Pop music is making us depressed. But there’s a happy pill for that

Pop music is making us depressed. But there’s a happy pill for that | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Why are we so depressed? Well, that would require a book, but science show us our popular music is part of the problem.
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Hysterically funny love letter to Hayley Williams of Paramore wrapped in a smattering of relevant research mixed with a healthy contempt for today's plastic pop stars - definitely worth a read!

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Finding ‘Flow’ | Empower2Perform

Finding ‘Flow’ | Empower2Perform | Music to work to | Scoop.it

Have you ever felt that nothing seems to matter when you’re engaged in your activity and experiencing peak performance? You’re on ‘autopilot’ or you’re ‘in the zone?’ Perhaps you’ve heard others say they’re ‘at one with the music?’ Any idea what it all means, how you feel, and...

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Great introduction to the idea of Flow and how you can get there more quickly.  Not necessarily music specific - but the use of music to work to can enhance your transition into a flow state more easily! 

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