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Ear study debunks myths about loud music

Ear study debunks myths about loud music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
New research shows the ear can protect itself after being exposed to loud music at a rock concert by becoming less sensitive temporarily.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is more about explaining the ear's behavior after being exposed to loud music - the temporary loss of hearing is the body's natural defense mechanism and doesn't lead to long term damage.  However - sustained listening to high volumes is inevitably going to bugger your hearing up for good!

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How Music Can Improve Your Life and Create Flow
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The Psychology of Music | Visual.ly

The Psychology of Music | Visual.ly | Music to work to | Scoop.it
There’s more to why we like music than just a catchy beat or an easy karaoke tune.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

The University of Florida make their case for the Music program by creating a pretty solid infographic on the psychology of music - a good overview and well worth the time to check it out

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Scientists Capture The Sound Of A Single Atom

Scientists Capture The Sound Of A Single Atom | Music to work to | Scoop.it
What does an atom sound like? Apparently it's a "D-note."

That's according to scientists at Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden, who have revealed in a new study that they've captured the sound of a single atom.

...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is frickin' awesome - not so much for the physics - which are pretty amazing - but for the fact that it's a D!  I think I read somewhere about Billy Joel and Elton John talking about what their favorite key to compose in was and both of them agreeing that there's just something about the key of D and D minor in particular that just feels good.    Now whether this has anything to do with some deep subliminal resonance - who knows - but I like playing in D too!

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Pop music too loud and all sounds the same: official

Pop music too loud and all sounds the same: official | Music to work to | Scoop.it
LONDON (Reuters) - Comforting news for anyone over the age of 35, scientists have worked out that modern pop music really is louder and does all sound the same.Researchers in Spain used a huge archive
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Yes - this headline will appeal to people over 35 - but I don't think the kids need to get too worried.  We're seeing the expression of technology and economy and while Dr. Luke and Max martin might be behind most of the pop out there - it won't stay that way for long.  Every generation decried the music of the one that comes after it and while data is interesting - has music ever, really, been about datasets and statistics?!?!? 

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A sound idea: can ambient noise make us work harder?

A sound idea: can ambient noise make us work harder? | Music to work to | Scoop.it
The Times has installed typewriter noise in its newsroom, the latest attempt to use sound to affect us functionally
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Super interesting idea that the Times would add the anachronistic sound of typewriters in the news room - and that as they reach press deadline the volume increases.  I'm not sure this is the way to go but it will be interesting to see the results.  The rest of the article looks at how music has struggled to be utilized as a mass productivity tool, we know from our own studies and research that music is such a personal thing that going for economies of scale isn't going to work.   Still,  there's no doubt that sound and the auditory system has a huge impact on us humans.

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Is Noise Always Bad? Exploring the Effects of Ambient Noise on Creative Cognition

Is Noise Always Bad? Exploring the Effects of Ambient Noise on Creative Cognition | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I loved reading this study - it reminded me of my own undergraduate work as a Psych major when I was looking at how sound affected physical performance.  What the paper is suggesting is that the low level processing systems of the brain get occupied by the ambient noise, forcing the brain to use a higher level of processing when attending to additional tasks.  This results in greater creativity - which is something we've been gambling our live on!

 

You can read about my original study here:

 

http://music2work2.com/music2work2-music-to-work-to/why-listening-music-makes-you-smarter

 

and then go listen to some pleasant ambient noise - like - instrumental music2work2!

 

Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/smemon/4436909284

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The Super Simple Way to Improve Your Mood

The Super Simple Way to Improve Your Mood | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Use this trick to bust through your next funk
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Study out of Missouri that looked at mood regulation - particularly how to make yourself happier using variations of happy sounding and less positive music combined with setting an intention to be happier.  Seems that you need both - happy music and a good intention and you can improve your mood.  Awesome!

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Music as medicine has huge potential, study suggests

Music as medicine has huge potential, study suggests | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Music boosts the body's immune system and is more effective than prescription drugs in reducing anxiety before a surgery, a research review from two psychologists at Montreal's McGill University suggests.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This was the study published last year from Daniel Levitin and Mona Lisa Chanda that reviewed 400 scientific papers on how music affects the human being.  It's pretty clear that there are significant benefits across the board and the idea of music as medicine (a medicine with no side effects,) is something we can all get behind.  A nice summary and worth the read.

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The Many Health Benefits of Music on The Brain - Daily Health Post

The Many Health Benefits of Music on The Brain - Daily Health Post | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Nice little primer article into how music is good for you - some good links out to studies and a groovy little info graphic at the end.  one to share with the doubting Thomas' in your life!

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Bryony Crane's curator insight, September 10, 10:11 PM

Stay well with music!

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Why do we love the music we heard as teenagers? - Bubblews

Why do we love the music we heard as teenagers? - Bubblews | Music to work to | Scoop.it
As I plod through my 20s, I’ve noticed a strange phenomenon: The music I loved as a teenager means more to me than ever—but with each passing year...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Well thought out and presented article that looks at the neuroscience and psychology behind our attachment to the songs from our youth.  If you've ever wondered why certain tracks stay with you after all these years - have a read - well worth it!

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Bouncing to the Beatles Breeds Benevolent Babies

Bouncing to the Beatles Breeds Benevolent Babies | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Canadian researchers find synchronized movement to music can inspire altruism in 14-month-old infants.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I love this study - researchers showed that children as young as 14 months can be influenced to exhibit spontaneous helping behavior if they have previously engaged in synchronous behavior with the object of their assistance!  read the article for the details but the takeaway for me is that it isn't necessarily about music - the researchers reckoned that music probably wasn't necessary - what was necessary was the movement and visual recognition that another human being was moving in the same way as them.  What music was doing here was to deliver the auditory cues on when to move - and that for me is a huge insight into how music affects us.  It's often not that music has some special magic that makes things happen - it's that music is so prevalent and we're so used to acting on its inherent nature (i.e rhythm, beat, melody, mood, bass lines) that its our actions that are the cause but we attribute them to music.  

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This Music Will Make You Feel Invincible

This Music Will Make You Feel Invincible | Music to work to | Scoop.it
By Tom Jacobs

As its recent reincarnation on Broadway reminded us, you can’t separate Rocky from its music. It’s easy to believe the lovable underdog boxer could be a champion, so long as that rousing, brass-heavy score is roaring as...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This one has been making the rounds this week for obvious reasons.  If just listening to music can make you feel and act more powerful then that's pretty good information to have.  the study isolated the driver to be heavy bass beats in the tracks which has certainly been a major growth area in popular music over the last decade or so.  Nothing terribly new here - athletes and competitors of all kinds have used music to pump themselves up before an event - it's just interesting to see that one specific aspect of the music - the bass - can have such an impact.

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Listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons

Listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Distraction is an effective pain reliever, and a new study concludes that listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons who can easily become absorbed in cognitive activities.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Interesting study with decent sample size of 145 subjects that experienced controlled pain while focusing on music.   The idea is that music helps reduce pain because it activates sensory pathways that compete with the pain pathways and the data seems to back this up.  What was super interesting was that they got the participants to rank their anxiety about the pain before hand and had hypothesized that those with high anxiety with the pain would be least affected by the music.  Turns out the opposite - apparently the more anxious you are about the pain - the more likely it is that the music will have a positive and soothing effect. 

 

Image credit: Quinn Dombrowski - Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/5151278314

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Practice may not make perfect

Practice may not make perfect | Music to work to | Scoop.it
TO MASTER the violin takes 10,000 hours of practice. Put in that time and expertise will follow. This, at least, is what many music teachers—following Malcolm...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I like this article - not least because the dataset involved over a thousand twins!  Bottom line - no amount of practicing is going to turn you into a pro unless you have a genetic predisposition.  So - sorry to all the people out there who tell their kids "You can do anything you want if you just try hard enough." yes it's a nice sentiment but the real world doesn't work that way.  It reminds me of student athletes who are promised they could play in the pros one day but whose parents gifted them a smaller frame than their competition.  It doesn't matter how hard you work - if you're 8 inches shorter than the other guy - it's going to be tough!

 

Image Credit: Manly Football on Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/photos/manlyfootball/6834097295

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Interactive lab explores music’s scientific potential

Interactive lab explores music’s scientific potential | Music to work to | Scoop.it
McMaster University’s LIVELab invites researchers to explore musical questions previously inaccessible to science
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is super cool - reminds me of the sound room back in my undergraduate days at Westminster University - there was a soundproofed room in the basement of one of the faculty buildings - it was pretty small but you couldn't spend too much time in there 'cos the sound of your own body started to freak you out.  this is that room on a much much bigger scale and by the 'sounds" of it - is going open many doors into how sound and music and auditory experience affects us human beings.  I want to go!!!

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Science Shows Your Taste in Music Says More About You Than You Think

Science Shows Your Taste in Music Says More About You Than You Think | Music to work to | Scoop.it
What type of music do you listen to?
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Yeah - it reads well - but I'm just not sure about this.  To me it's still putting people in boxes and just by allocating all the different musical genres into 4 categories defined by salient sonic and emotional characteristics - you're still not going to avoid all the things about genre that researchers are trying to ignore.  Studies like this end up delivering big sweeping types of information that people inevitably end up trying to use and then getting it wrong and having arguments blah blah blah....

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The Music That Has Helped Me Battle Depression

The Music That Has Helped Me Battle Depression | Music to work to | Scoop.it
I am what is referred to as a F33.2. On the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, this means that I have recurrent, severe depressive disorder without psychotic symptoms. It means that my depression comes from a place that is hard to climb out of, that alienates...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Deeply personal reflection from an author who deals with depression and who uses music to mitigate its effects as best he can.  It's the "No side effects" that seems to resonate throughout the use of music in health related fields - whether its managing mood or impairing energy and memory - music seems to be the one drug you can't overdose on.  

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Dangerous Decibels

Dangerous Decibels | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

We occasionally see articles about loud music and the damage it can do to teen's ears.  What we didn't know is that there is a movement called Dangerous Decibels which tackles the problem directly.  What we like about this is that it give parents tangible advice on how to help their kids keep their hearing.  If you're the parent of kid who seems to have ear buds surgically implanted in their ear canal - you might want to check this out.

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How to Listen to Music at Work Without Sacrificing Productivity

How to Listen to Music at Work Without Sacrificing Productivity | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Putting on your headphones to tune out office distractions can do more harm than good if you're listening to focus-sapping music.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

There's pretty much a consensus nowadays that listening to music at work can help productivity - bosses and managers are getting used to seeing employees wearing ear buds and headphones and are even welcoming the fact.  As the idea matures we see writers spending less time on justification and more on how to make the music really work for you.  This Amex article look s at what types of music can help different working activities - nothing earth shattering here but it's great to see such corporate media channels getting on the music at work bandwagon.

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Library, Magic House Team Up to Help Ferguson Kids Cope with Crisis

Library, Magic House Team Up to Help Ferguson Kids Cope with Crisis | Music to work to | Scoop.it
A unicorn. A Blues Stanley Cup. An end to the violence in Ferguson. To finally start school. Peace. These were...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

It's amazing to me how fast music therapy is gaining ground in society.  There's nothing new about putting on activities and distractions for kids in tough environments, such as the hell everybody went through inFergusonearlier this year - but the fact that a music therapist is part of those activities and a very popular one to boot - is an indication of just how far we've come.

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The art and science of whispering

The art and science of whispering | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Belinda Lopez enters a world of whispering women and scientific curiosity.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I'm personally very familiar with the tingling sensation that ASMR describes - having experienced it a lot as a kid, so I was blown away to find a burgeoning online community.  This is a great introduction to the ASMR world with different perspectives from a physiologist to a neuroscientist to a therapist.  I think there are a lot of parallels between the effect that ASMR has on the body and what music to work to can do.

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The Undercover Soundtrack - Alice Degan

The Undercover Soundtrack - Alice Degan | Music to work to | Scoop.it

'Music is a ritual of invocation' Once a week I host a writer who uses music as part of their creative environment – perhaps to connect with a character, populate a mysterious place, or hold a mome...

Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is a really interesting look into how an author sets up a playlist to help her reach the place where she can fall into her characters.  The bit that resonates deeply with me is the whole ritual aspect and the identification of a track as an entry point into the act of writing.

 

Also I'm a huge Thomas Tallis fan and Vaughan William's Fantasia is now on my working playlist!

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Mozart as Medicine: The Health Benefits of Music

Mozart as Medicine: The Health Benefits of Music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Learn about the health benefits of music and how to use music therapy to relieve stress, reduce pain, and improve your health.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Long but well put together article that looks at the current research on music therapy.  The main takeaway is that the majority of studies are flawed and don't really define how the clear benefits associated with music therapy are attributed.  More research is needed - but there is the final point - that undoubtedly music does have a positive benefit and unlike all the pills and other procedures - there are no negative side effects!

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5 Ways to Incorporate Music into the Workplace

5 Ways to Incorporate Music into the Workplace | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Nice overview on music in the workplace - complete with some listening recommendations - The Simcity 4 soundtrack is a favorite for many knowledge workers

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Relaxation Techniques for Migraines and Headaches

Relaxation Techniques for Migraines and Headaches | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Learning relaxation techniques is an important part of migraine and headache relief. Read these tips.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Headaches are horrible and dealing with them can be a nightmare.  This article looks at relaxation techniques which have been shown to help people suffering from headaches and migraines.  One of the recommendations is to use calming music in the background - which makes sense so long as it isn't "loud" music!  Some music2work2 would be perfect for this.

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How music prevents organ rejection

How music prevents organ rejection | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Music has a fundamental affect on humans. It can reduce stress, enhance relaxation, provide a distraction from pain, and improve the results of clinical therapy.

 

MUSIC: http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=music

 


Via Sakis Koukouvis
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

research from Japan on Mice - the only thing you need to know is this:


"They found that opera and classical music both increased the time before the transplanted organs failed, but single frequency monotones and new age music did not."


take that Yanni!


;-p

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