Music to work to
Follow
Find
11.0K views | +0 today
Music to work to
How Music Can Improve Your Life and Create Flow
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Study: When Things Look Dark, Country Music Gets Sunnier

Study: When Things Look Dark, Country Music Gets Sunnier | Music to work to | Scoop.it
New research finds socioeconomic conditions impact the type of songs that become hits, but in opposite ways for pop and country music.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I love this study - the data is compelling although I'm not 100% sure about the reasons posited by the researchers as to why.  In essence - pop music is happy when the nation is up and doing well and sad when the nation is doing poorly.  Country music however is the opposite with upbeat lyrics and major chords more prevalent during times of depression.  Which regardless of why - is just fascinating and if I'd known this when I was a working songwriter on a country gig - maybe we'd have been more successful! ;-p

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

There's a reason why great music can give you a 'skin orgasm' — chills down your spine

There's a reason why great music can give you a 'skin orgasm' — chills down your spine | Music to work to | Scoop.it
When was the last time that music moved you, not just emotionally, but physically? Researcher Psyche Loui says music can give you a "skin orgasm." And there may be an evolutionary reason why we get that chill down our spine.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Researcher Psyche Loui fromWeslyanUniversitytalks about the whole "Why Music" discussion.  Using the recent insights into chills and anhedonia as a starting point, Psyche places emphasis on the strong neural connection between the processing of sound and emotions.  She proposes that music could have evolved as a form of emotional communication.  Sure makes sense to me. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Study examines link between recalling alcohol brands in popular music and binge drinking in teens

Study examines link between recalling alcohol brands in popular music and binge drinking in teens | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Binge drinking by teenagers and young adults is strongly associated with liking, owning, and correctly identifying music that references alcohol by brand name according to a study by the University of Pittsburgh and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

File this under "Duh!" Good size study though - 2500 people between the ages of 15 and 23. In essence - if you can remember the names of alcohol brands in popular songs you're twice as likely to have had a drink and more likely to binge. Which of course does open a whole chicken and egg thing - is it the booze first that makes you identify with it in the music - or is it the music first that gets you to drink.

What i liked about this was that the researchers stayed away from that but what they did propose was better education in media literacy so that kids are aware of how brands can be driving their behavior. I kinda dig that!

 

Image Credit: Harpenden NCH - Coffee Bar by Philip Howard
https://www.flickr.com/photos/22326055@N06/5914408265

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Whistle While You Work (but probably not while you edit)

Whistle While You Work (but probably not while you edit) | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Music is about as dangerous for me as tequila. The last time I drank tequila I was nineteen years old and in Arizona. Well, that’s not true. The last time I remember drinking tequila was in Arizona...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I thought this was hilarious and informative all at the same time - who could ask for anything more!?  A writer researches the literature to find out if there really is a benefit to listening to music while you write or edit.  It's a fun read and exposes the fact that there is so much contradictory information out there, it's tempting to think that the naysayers and proponents cancel each other out.  He's smart enough to avoid that pitfall - yes - music sure has an effect - just not always positive.  He decides that on the whole - writing to music makes more sense to him than editing but there are more caveats in the piece than big pharma's small print.  As the great prophet Brian said "You have to work it out for yourself!"

"....Yes! We have to work it out for ourselves!"

...sigh...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Sound Science: Music Psychologist On What Makes a Happy Song

Sound Science: Music Psychologist On What Makes a Happy Song | Music to work to | Scoop.it
To help understand the DNA of a happy song, we spoke with Dr. Adrian North -- an Australian music psychologist who consulted with Rock Mafia during
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Short but insightful interview with music psychologist Dr. Adrian North, ostensibly to look at what makes music "happy" but covering how we interact with music in the modern day.  The idea behind happy music is that it's generally fast and is arousing - which isn't exactly rocket science,  what was more interesting was the comment that scientists have pretty much given up studying lyrics as people's relationship with the words are so subjective and idiosyncratic. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Springtime ignites with melodious birdsong

Springtime ignites with melodious birdsong | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Gracing humanity with their melodious symphonic sounds, North American songbirds call attention to the advent of springtime.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Lot's of interest in the beneficial effects of birdsong recently.  This article gives a nice summary as to the positive affect birdsong can have on us human beings and makes the case that with ever increasing population density, we could definitely use more of it.  Julian Treasure would approve!

more...
M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, March 27, 9:07 PM

Beautiful post Andrew, we both love-de-birdies

Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Study finds the family "taxi" might be the ideal place to develop a child's interest in music

Study finds the family "taxi" might be the ideal place to develop a child's interest in music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Case Western Reserve University music educator Lisa Huisman Koops realized during the daily 20-minute commute to her daughter's preschool that the family vehicle might be an ideal—and overlooked—place to develop a child's awareness and interest in music.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Although you can probably file this one under "Duh" - the big question is - how does one get a grant like this?!?!?  This is brilliant!  I don't think I'd quite call it a study but this small "observation" showed that the car is a great place to share music with your kids - well worth a quick read and definitely worth adopting the behaviors if you've got kids that you have to ferry around!

 

Image Credit: Ashley Rose - Flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ashleyrosex/3738013690/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Will Music Make Your Child Smarter?

Will Music Make Your Child Smarter? | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

My own thoughts on the current debate about whether society should pay for early music training

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Differences between musicians and non-musicians in neuro-affective processing of sadness and fear expressed in music

Differences between musicians and non-musicians in neuro-affective processing of sadness and fear expressed in music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Not sure what the sample size was but this was super interesting.  Musicians and non-musicians brains were compared when listening to music that conveyed three different emotions: happiness, sadness and fear.  Seems that musicians find sadness and fear way more arousing than non-musicians whereas happy music had little effect!

 

 

I can't Sleep - digital-art by balt-arts on Flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/balt-arts/5036427345/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Why we love repetition in music – Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis – Aeon

Why we love repetition in music – Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis – Aeon | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Why do we listen to our favourite music over and over again? Because repeated sounds work magic in our brains
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is a fabulous article and includes some simple experiments that are really quite eye - or should I say ear opening.  Building on the idea that repetition is fundamental to how we experience music, the author weaves a compelling story that most will find really interesting and insightful.

more...
Linda Alexander's curator insight, March 19, 2:27 PM

So true!

Angie Mc's curator insight, March 19, 2:45 PM

Fascinating article! Yet one more reason to include music in family life.

Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Does music training enhance working memory performance? Findings from a quasi-experimental longitudinal study

Does music training enhance working memory performance? Findings from a quasi-experimental longitudinal study | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

So now we're getting into the nitty gritty of how music training actually affects the brain.  In this study fromGermanywe're looking at how musical training affects memory performance.

 

Groups of 50 children between the ages of 7 and 8 were tracked over an 18 month period.  One group had 45 minutes of weekly instrumental music training whereas the control group had 45 minutes of natural science training.

 

I'm not going to get into the details of Baddely's working memory model (you can read more about it here) but suffice it to say that the music group saw superior development in a number of aspects of working memory when compared to the control group.

 

Image credit: Katie and her flute - Simon Whitaker - Flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/chubbybat/46498257/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

The complete guide to listening to music at work

The complete guide to listening to music at work | Music to work to | Scoop.it
If you’re reading this article at work, there’s a decent chance you’re wearing headphones. It has never been easier to tune in to your own customized soundtrack—or more necessary to tune out your open-office coworkers, cubicle mates, and fellow coffee-shop denizens. But not all music is created equal, especially when there's work to be done. How...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

A nice overview from Quartz with some basics on how music affects your brain at work.  Some good tips and even a few recommended tracks and playlists.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Chills and thrills: why some people love music – and others don't

Chills and thrills: why some people love music – and others don't | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Think of your favourite piece of music. Do you get shivers when the music swells or the chorus kicks in? Or are the opening few bars enough to make you feel tingly? Despite having no obvious survival value…
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Quite a few articles last week on this Study out ofBarcelonathat identified the Music Anhedonic - i.e. - someone who doesn't get pleasure out of music.  This article breaks it down very well, going into the neurobiology and also extends the discussion into the reasons behind why we like particular types of music - well worth the read. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

I Listened To Music Designed For Focus By Scientists - And My Productivity Shot Up

I Listened To Music Designed For Focus By Scientists - And My Productivity Shot Up | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Taming a wandering brain on demand isn’t easy, especially when you need to be able to focus, understand what you’re working on and meet a deadline.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I like the focus@will team - we pretty much believe the same things and it's great to read write ups like this from people who have been skeptical about the idea of music to work to.   

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Brands can engage multiple generations with pop music | Analysis | Marketing Week

Brands can engage multiple generations with pop music | Analysis | Marketing Week | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Those aged 20 to 60 are listening to the same music so brands that use it can engage with multiple generations, finds exclusive research.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Rather long piece that covers a number of different aspects but the big takeaway is the inexorable move by businesses to harness music to sell their products.  What they are doing is looking to establish relationships through music between you and their brands - although I'm not sure I want a musical birthday card sent to me from a bank!

 

One interesting aspect is the power of rock and pop music has meant that for the first time you can use the same music to appeal to people in their 20's and their 60's - that's a multi generation span that wasn't available to brands a few decades ago.  Interesting read.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Music multitasking: How 'background' listening enhances life - CNET

Music multitasking: How 'background' listening enhances life - CNET | Music to work to | Scoop.it
One of the prevailing trends in audiophile circles is the notion that, to fully appreciate music, you have to stop doing anything else and just listen. I disagree.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

So there's this "discussion" over on CNET between a couple of editors - Steve Guttenberg and Geoffrey Morrison - on the relative merits of listening to music.  As ever, no-one's really right and there's good stuff in both arguments.  However, I would probably side with Geoffrey, not for the whole music to work to, which is background music, which is good etc - but for the fact that I just hate snobs!!!!  Nobody should tell you how to enjoy music - there is no right way or wrong way and what works for you doesn't have to work for somebody else.  Yes, as with just about anything on the planet, if you learn more about music you'll appreciate it more but that doesn't mean you need to or that your current relationship with music is flawed! /rant.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Effects of choir singing or listening on emotional state

Effects of choir singing or listening on emotional state | Music to work to | Scoop.it
PubMed comprises more than 23 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

A bit short on actual information on the study such as number of subjects etc - but the data showed that singing in the choir increased positive feelings and reduced the amount of stress hormone cortisol in your system.   Funnily enough - listening to the choral music also reduced the cortisol but actually increased negative feelings!  I'm guessing they weren't singing anything too popular! ;-p  It seems that the current popularity of choirs and singing has real physical benefits - hooray for that!

 

Popo Up Choir 1 -Canberra- by Michelle - on Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/photos/quiltingmick/12870374525/

more...
David Hain's curator insight, April 1, 2:57 AM

A friend of mine cured depression by singing in a choir.

M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, April 4, 5:36 PM

Music as healer?

Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

77% of People Listen to Music at Work!

77% of People Listen to Music at Work! | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

It's the 77% figure from Sheffield University that blows me away.  Really shines a light on how Music is becoming more of a utility - interesting stuff!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Listening to the Secret Sounds of the Large Hadron Collider

Listening to the Secret Sounds of the Large Hadron Collider | Music to work to | Scoop.it
From the Golden Gate Bridge to an ancient Japanese bell, the physical structures around us are humming with secret sound. Artist Bill Fontana has made a career of capturing these haunting and complex soundscapes. As an artist at residence at CERN, he's mostly recently been listening in on the world's largest particle collider.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Add this to the growing list of people making "music" from anything they can think of - constellations, particle physics, car engines - this time it's from the Large Hadron Collider.  Gotta say though - not really musical to my ears - certainly interesting and personally I'm a big fan of the Finneston crane "reacting to the ambient energy ofGlasgow!" but what does all this mean?! 

 

The artist is making the case that sound is an undervalued energy when you compare it to visual energies like light - and I think that's very true.  I may not be wowed by what these guys come up with (generally plinky and growly) but I'm all for expanding our knowledge and investigating the sonic world - so - get down to the Hadron Collider Y'all!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Effects of music in hospitals

Effects of music in hospitals | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Can music in hospital settings be beneficial? What kinds of beneficial effects can music have in this context? In general, music has been reported as beneficial in healthcare settings. Listening to music can have positive effects in particular areas of hospitals according to a report. Those areas
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Plenty of evidence, both scientific and anecdotal as to the benefits music can deliver to everybody at the hospital - patients and staff alike!  Another quick summary from Dr. Haake

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

How music can help to reduce workplace stress

How music can help to reduce workplace stress | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Work-related stress is related to ill-health. Stress in the workplace can also reduce productivity, in particular when stress manifests itself as a reduction in psychological well-being. This has a very real and clear financial impact on organisations and their budgets, as stress at work costs the
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

We've featured Dr. Anneli Haake's research into music in the work place before, in this article she addresses two of the major ways in which music can reduce workplace stress.  First in the way in which music can induce positive emotions and secondly - and perhaps more interestingly, the way in which music can give the listener control over their environment.  It seems that control over one's environment has a huge impact on wellbeing.

 

 

Music controls by Tom Magliery on Flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mag3737/534189886/

more...
Lauran Star's curator insight, March 21, 12:36 PM

Let music play on...

Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

Music, emotion and the brain

Music, emotion and the brain | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

More from a busy Vicky Williamson as she breaks down a recent article in Nature Reviews Neuroscience on Music evoked Emotions.  The data seems to support the idea that music can evoke specific emotions and looks at the areas of the brain that may play a part.  The big idea here is the secondary feedback loop - i.e. - if music can make you feel good, then you might smile, and the act of smiling in turn makes you feel good and then you're in a virtuous circle - all triggered by a specific piece of music.  This has huge implications to the music therapy world.  A complex but ultimately easily digestible summary!

 

Image credit: Music Therapy by emanuela franchini on Flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/flea_ef/2018883978/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

How the brain recognizes familiar music | Newsroom - McGill University

How the brain recognizes familiar music | Newsroom - McGill University | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

More memory related work, this time on the production effect - the idea that you will remember something better if you actually do it - say it out loud or play it - rather than just listen to it.  This study demonstrated it with 20 pianists wearing groovy skullcaps!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

How Background Music Can Affect Your Attention

How Background Music Can Affect Your Attention | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Study at Lisbon University that shows how background music will affect what you choose to look at.  Relatively small study but interesting data

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Andrew McCluskey
Scoop.it!

MRI scan study shows link between music and language

MRI scan study shows link between music and language | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Jazz musicians are famous for their musical conversations - one improvises a few bars and another plays an answer. Now research shows some of the brain's language regions enable that musical back-and-forth much like a spoken conversation.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

More music and language investigation - I like this study as the idea of having jazz pianists inside an MRI machine and playing a plastic keyboard through a series of mirrors is just well, intriguing!  In essence when the pianists inside the MRI were "trading phrases" with another musician in the control room - the brain areas lighting up were the same ones that process the syntax of language.  What was interesting to me though was that even though these areas were being activated, at the same time areas that process the meaning of words were being tuned down.

more...
No comment yet.