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Music to work to
How Music Can Improve Your Life and Create Flow
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Do you have friends that say "Oh, but I'm not musical at all"?

Do you have friends that say "Oh, but I'm not musical at all"? | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Researchers might have found the first case of ‘beat deafness’
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

It's estimated that about 4% of people in Western Europe andNorth Americasuffer (and I use the words suffer with full intent!) from amusia - a condition that makes it horribly difficult to recognize and reproduce melodies or rhythms.

 

This article looks at some of the science and testing behind the condition.  Scary stuff!

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Grad School Playlist: Why We Need Music To Survive Grad School

Grad School Playlist: Why We Need Music To Survive Grad School | Music to work to | Scoop.it
By: Niki Fritz When I asked Josh Sites about the role of music in his life, he gave me one of those furrow-browed, overly pensive looks he dons when he is about to unload some heavy thoughts or tak...
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A musician and music lover's thoughts on why music is so important - ranging from evolution, through specific playlists for different activities and then touching on the idea of flow.  Good stuff!

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7 Reasons You Should Listen To Music When You Work Out

7 Reasons You Should Listen To Music When You Work Out | Music to work to | Scoop.it
A recent study found that not just listening, but controlling and creating music in time to one's pace had an even more profound effect on perceived effort during a workout.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Wondering about whether you should add music to your workout?  Here's a nice list from the Huffington post - with links out to research - that shows why perhaps you should give it a try.

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New study says listening to jazz music could improve your putting: The Loop

New study says listening to jazz music could improve your putting: The Loop | Music to work to | Scoop.it
If you’re struggling with your putting and have exhausted all other options, Clarkson University may have just offered you a lifeline.According to a new study by the school published in the Journal of Athletic Enhancement, listening to music while you...
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I'll be sending this one to my dad!  Admittedly by the researcher - a sample size of 22 isn't exactly viable - however - seems that listening to music - in particular Jazz music - can affect your golf game - at least when it comes to putting!  No big surprise here - but I suspect the PGA have rules about golfers wearing headphones - mind you - it would be kind of cool to see Tiger Woods rocking a huge pair of Beats headphones as he swings! 

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This Is How Music Can Change Your Brain

This Is How Music Can Change Your Brain | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Actively learning to play an instrument can help a child's academic achievement
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I tell every new parent I meet about the benefits of learning an instrument.  It's research from stalwarts like Nina Kraus at Northwestern that help to put the kibosh on the whole Mozart theory and shine the light on the real benefits that come from engaging with music.  The big takeaway is that the kid actually has to engage in class - like anything - if they're not going to make the effort to learn - they're not going to get the benefit.  But kids who enjoy learning an instrument and actively participate do see improvements in how the brain processes speech and reading scores - that's gotta be good!

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Hip-hop helps with depression says study

Hip-hop helps with depression says study | Music to work to | Scoop.it
LONDON — With its links to gang warfare, drugs and drive-by shootings, the hip-hop music scene has never professed to be beneficial for health.
But now psychiatrists at Cambridge University believe that “hip-hop therapy” could help people who are depressed or mentally ill.
In an article in The Lancet Psychiatry, the team claims lyrics that speak of overcoming hardships and struggles offer a refuge for the desperate, while rapping problems acts as an emotional outlet.
“Much of hip-hop comes fr
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Study out ofCambridgeUniversity- so its got to have some validity no?  The idea here is about helping mentally ill and depressed people through positive visual  imagery by using the lyrics from rap and hip hop.  As the researchers say - hip hop lyrics often refer to overcoming struggles and projecting what the good life looks like - all lyrical topics that can help people create a similar vision for themselves.  It's a little bit "file under duh!" but hell - whatever works to help people has gotta be good, but I'm guessing they won't be trying this therapy with white middle-class patients!

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Science Proves: Pop Music Has Actually Gotten Worse

Science Proves: Pop Music Has Actually Gotten Worse | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Science confirms what you've always suspected: music these days is worse than it used to be.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I like this study - although the title is a little "linkbaity" - it looks at how music has changed over the last 60 years through the lenses of :
1. Timbre - which is all about the tonal quality - how it actually sounds
2. Pitch - which looks at the dynamism of the track - harmonies, chords, melodies etc
3. Loudness - yes - just how loud the song is when you play it

And the results show that since 1955 - timbral variety decreased, pitch content decreased and loudness increased.

Shocker huh!?

I could speculate forever on the reasons behind this but I suspect the main culprits are economics and technology. But I'm an optimist and have no doubt once the humans assimilate the new electronic instruments that we'll begin to see an expansion of the first two again.

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Michael Dunn's curator insight, January 16, 9:28 PM

Natural sciences, the arts: Can facts and theories across disciplines create a common groundwork of explanation?

Scott Langston's curator insight, January 19, 2:51 AM

Great for the common explanations essay!

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This is the kind of music you should listen to at work - Telegraph

This is the kind of music you should listen to at work - Telegraph | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Listening to music at work increases accuracy and speed, a new study has found. The genre you should choose, from classical music to dance beats, depends on what your work involves
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Of course one has to be careful with "Industry" funded studies but this is just more evidence of how companies are looking to use music to drive productivity in the workplace.  The thing is they still seem to be applying a "one rule fits all" approach - and we know that it really doesn't.  Here they try to tell you which genre of music to listen to while doing a specific type of task and while there's some sense to this - it isn't going to work for everyone.  What companies need is not one stream which is sent out to everyone but a central library of tracks and playlists that each individual can choose from and select to create their own personal audio environment.

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Why you should control the music you work to

Why you should control the music you work to | Music to work to | Scoop.it

Music by Modes Rodríguez on Flickr

 Part of a study from Dr. Amanda Krause and colleagues showed that how people experienced their music had a significant impact on how they felt about it.  Implications on music to work to

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Your Brain... A Social Network?

Your Brain... A Social Network? | Music to work to | Scoop.it
SciWorks Radio is a production of 88.5 WFDD and SciWorks, the Science Center and Environmental Park of Forsyth County, located in Winston-Salem. Human made
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is brilliant - I love how the science is getting better and better.  here's the takeaway; when you listen to music that you like, but that is not necessarily your favorite, your brain engages the memory formation networks.  However - when you listen to your favorite music, the brain no longer engages the memory formation networks.  Which kinda makes sense - 'cos it's already know - it's your favorite - and so the brain can devote resources elsewhere.  Which opens the door to more accurate music therapy when developing a program for Alzheimer's patients.  Awesome!

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Motivation: Get into the “Flow” with Music in Sport and Exercise - The Sport In Mind – Sport Psychology

Motivation: Get into the “Flow” with Music in Sport and Exercise - The Sport In Mind – Sport Psychology | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Good overview article of how you can introduce music to your sport and exercise routine to get into a state of Flow more quickly.  Good examples from world class athletes backed up by research - if you're at all interested in this area - this is well worth the read.

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Interactive lab explores music’s scientific potential

Interactive lab explores music’s scientific potential | Music to work to | Scoop.it
McMaster University’s LIVELab invites researchers to explore musical questions previously inaccessible to science
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is super cool - reminds me of the sound room back in my undergraduate days at Westminster University - there was a soundproofed room in the basement of one of the faculty buildings - it was pretty small but you couldn't spend too much time in there 'cos the sound of your own body started to freak you out.  this is that room on a much much bigger scale and by the 'sounds" of it - is going open many doors into how sound and music and auditory experience affects us human beings.  I want to go!!!

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Science Shows Your Taste in Music Says More About You Than You Think

Science Shows Your Taste in Music Says More About You Than You Think | Music to work to | Scoop.it
What type of music do you listen to?
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Yeah - it reads well - but I'm just not sure about this.  To me it's still putting people in boxes and just by allocating all the different musical genres into 4 categories defined by salient sonic and emotional characteristics - you're still not going to avoid all the things about genre that researchers are trying to ignore.  Studies like this end up delivering big sweeping types of information that people inevitably end up trying to use and then getting it wrong and having arguments blah blah blah....

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Study finds music is universal – from the rainforest to the metropolis - The Strad

Study finds music is universal – from the rainforest to the metropolis  - The Strad | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I kinda like this - have two massively disparate groups - and I guess you can't get much more different than Pygmies and Canadians - then play them different pieces of music - half of it western classical, the other half Pygmie "classical" - and get the groups to rate their emotions using emoticons - simple!

 

Turns out that music does tend to elicit the same emotion regardless of culture - but the really interesting bit to me was that the Canadians displayed more emotional responses than the Pygmies.  The researchers revealed that there are no depressing songs in Pygmy culture and that they actually use upbeat music in order to "evacuate negative emotions."

 

I'm thinking the Pygmies might be interested to read some of the recent studies that show that depressing music can actually act as a positive mood regulator - still - fascinating stuff! 

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You Can Now Listen to Music With Your Bones

You Can Now Listen to Music With Your Bones | Music to work to | Scoop.it
You’ve never felt music like this before.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is kinda cool - I especially like the application for cyclists - where you experience music through your butt and leave your ears free to help you navigate the traffic.  Yes - you should probably read the article shouldn't you!

;-p

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Does Music Have Healing Powers?

Does Music Have Healing Powers? | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Studies shows music is a potent treatment for mental health. Thanks Pete Seeger!
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Research is now making it clear that music has positive impact across the full spectrum of mental illness from schizophrenia through to chronic pain.  This article looks at the role Pete Seeger played in creating the environment for this to happen - he was indeed a dude! 

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Scientists study all the ways music can boost health

Scientists study all the ways music can boost health | Music to work to | Scoop.it
It’s only recently, with the advances in brain research, that science has begun to understand just how far-reaching the benefits of music can be for our physical and emotional health.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

A more general article that looks at all the different ways in which music is being used to boost health.  The one thing that resonated with me was the statement from a hospice program manager that hearing is the last sense to fade away at the end of life - the idea that music can accompany and soothe you in the darkness is deeply appealing. 

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How Repetition Enchants the Brain and the Psychology of Why We Love It in Music

How Repetition Enchants the Brain and the Psychology of Why We Love It in Music | Music to work to | Scoop.it
"Music takes place in time, but repetition beguilingly makes it knowable in the way of something outside of time." "The repetition itself (How repetition enchants the brain and the psychology of why we love it in music

Via playalongjon
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playalongjon's curator insight, September 21, 2014 5:43 PM

Chanting also comes to mind!

interconnectionss's curator insight, September 25, 2014 9:24 PM

So this is why I can remember every song I listen to, but everything I have learnt in my HSC seems like a vague, distant memory? 

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Get that song out of your head the scientific way - CNET

Get that song out of your head the scientific way - CNET | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Did you overhear a pop song at the supermarket that now won't leave your head alone? Scientists are claiming to have found the best way to banish it.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

We've looked at the dreaded earworm problem before but I hadn't seen this study that suggested the way to solve the whole "song stuck in my head" was to solve puzzles - in particular sudoku or by far the most effective, solving 5 letter anagrams.

 

Who knew?  You do now.  Thank us later!

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Feeling down? Then listen to sad music - it lifts the mood!

Feeling down? Then listen to sad music - it lifts the mood! | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Free University of Berlin discovered that nostalgia rather than sadness is the most common emotion evoked by sad music, such as ballads by Adele (pictured).
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

And we're back for 2015 with a little reminder from the immortal words of Bernie Taupin (as put to music by Elton John) that - Sad Songs (say so much) - or in this study - they help us feel so much.  The idea that you should listen to happy music if you want to feel good is not necessarily the case.  Sad songs can make you feel a number of emotions and act as cathartic "flushing" of bad feelings - so much so that most people find they get all happy and nostalgic, or if you come from Asia - at peace and rested.   So - the next time you're feeling down and find yourself reaching for your Spice Girls collection - stop - change gears and go for a bit of Joy Division or maybe a smattering of Bon Iver - it's good to cry!

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This Is Your Brain on Silence - Issue 16: Nothingness - Nautilus

This Is Your Brain on Silence - Issue 16: Nothingness - Nautilus | Music to work to | Scoop.it
One icy night in March 2010, 100 marketing experts piled into the Sea Horse Restaurant in Helsinki, with the modest goal of making…
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Fabulous article, well presented and backed up with insightful research.  For me it's the whole"Life in balance" thing again - just because listening to certain music can improve productivity some of the time - it doesn't mean it's going to work all of the time.  The big takeaway for me from this article is the need for contrast - for change.  While we could all benefit from neuronal growth during extended periods of silence - it's the change between the different states - noise to silence and back again that seem to really stimulate the brain.

#musictoworkto

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HSC exam guide: how to use music to prepare for exams

HSC exam guide: how to use music to prepare for exams | Music to work to | Scoop.it
Students, the impending horror of exams is nearly upon you. But music can help you out. To put it simply, turn to tunes to terminate the terror of term-time. As with so many psychological phenomena that…
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

It's interesting to see music being presented in such a utilitarian way but we've been expecting this for years now.  Adrian North looks at how to use the base mechanisms: physiological arousal and emotional influence to get the most out of your study time.  I especially liked the idea of listening to the music that you studied to just prior to the exam in order to aid recall.  This seems like low hanging fruit for switched on students!

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Your call is important to us: the history and psychology of hold music

Your call is important to us: the history and psychology of hold music | Music to work to | Scoop.it

In 2012, according to Australia’s Sydney Morning Herald, an Adelaide man was kept on hold with the airline Qantas for 15 hours. As a recorded message affirmed, over and over, that a customer service agent would be with him “soon,” he simply stayed on — working, reading, waiting. As he told the newspaper, “I wanted to find out what exactly they meant when they said they would be with me as soon as possible.”

Andrew McCluskey's insight:

The history of hold music - and the psychology behind it - fascinating to think about the early days of telephony and how exciting it was to get a phone call from another country.  I wonder what they would think of our modern smart phones.  An interesting and entertaining piece - worth the 5 minutes!

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The Psychology of Music | Visual.ly

The Psychology of Music | Visual.ly | Music to work to | Scoop.it
There’s more to why we like music than just a catchy beat or an easy karaoke tune.
Andrew McCluskey's insight:

The University of Florida make their case for the Music program by creating a pretty solid infographic on the psychology of music - a good overview and well worth the time to check it out

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Scientists Capture The Sound Of A Single Atom

Scientists Capture The Sound Of A Single Atom | Music to work to | Scoop.it
What does an atom sound like? Apparently it's a "D-note."

That's according to scientists at Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden, who have revealed in a new study that they've captured the sound of a single atom.

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Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This is frickin' awesome - not so much for the physics - which are pretty amazing - but for the fact that it's a D!  I think I read somewhere about Billy Joel and Elton John talking about what their favorite key to compose in was and both of them agreeing that there's just something about the key of D and D minor in particular that just feels good.    Now whether this has anything to do with some deep subliminal resonance - who knows - but I like playing in D too!

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