Aztecs
15 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

The Scoop Behind Ancient Poop

The Scoop Behind Ancient Poop | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“ The oldest-known locales where rhino-like reptiles gathered to poop and socialize some 240 million years ago have been uncovered in Argentina. ”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

'Nail down the tongue': Ancient magician's curse found in Jerusalem - NBCNews.com

'Nail down the tongue': Ancient magician's curse found in Jerusalem - NBCNews.com | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“ 'Nail down the tongue': Ancient magician's curse found in Jerusalem NBCNews.com Israel Antiquities Authority archaeologists excavated a 1,700-year-old curse tablet from a Roman mansion in the City of David in Jerusalem.”
Emily Wirth's insight:
This is pretty cool!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

Smart Talk: Ancient Greek and Roman ghost stories sound familiar; science of ... - witf.org

Smart Talk: Ancient Greek and Roman ghost stories sound familiar; science of ... - witf.org | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“ Smart Talk: Ancient Greek and Roman ghost stories sound familiar; science of ... witf.org University of Massachusetts Classics professor Dr. Debbie Felton appears on Thursday's Smart Talk to discuss ghost stories from ancient Greece and Rome.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

Cleaning Up Ancient Human DNA for Next Generation Sequencing

Cleaning Up Ancient Human DNA for Next Generation Sequencing | Aztecs | Scoop.it
With the genomes of Ötzi, the 5300-year-old iceman, and even Neandertals pouring out of DNA sequencing labs lately, you might think that it’s now a piece of cake to glean the entire genetic code of an ancient human. But it turns out that those studies used exceptionally pure samples of DNA taken from human bone, tooth, hair, or other tissue typically preserved in frozen soil, ice, or a chilly cave. More often, human remains found by scientists have been sitting in soil warm enough to harbor bacteria, which swamp out the human DNA with their genes and make it too costly to analyze. A clever new method for purifying ancient human DNA samples—reported here last week at the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics—could change that, however. The average ancient DNA sample taken from, say, a human tooth or bone is often less than 1% short, degraded pieces of human DNA; the rest is bacterial DNA. Although scientists could sequence this gemisch, they would have to run the samples through their sequencing machines many times to zoom in on the human DNA portion, and it’s not worth the cost. Instead, researchers often prepare stretches of modern human DNA that roughly match the genes or sequences they’re interested in and use these so-called probes to filter the sample. (Modern and ancient human DNA are similar enough that the probes will stick to the ancient DNA.) But this is still expensive, and it reveals the sequence of only a subset of the genome. A team at Stanford University has now come up with a better idea. Postdoctoral researcher Meredith Carpenter and others in the lab of Carlos Bustamante made their probes from RNA instead of DNA, which is “super cheap,” Bustamante says. They found a way to make enough RNA probes to cover the entire genome of an average modern human. The probe has a chemical group that sticks to special beads, so when the researchers mix the probes with an ancient DNA sample, they can wash away the nonhuman DNA. The final step is to use an RNA-chewing enzyme to get rid of the probes, leaving only pure ancient human DNA that can then be fed into a genome sequencing machine. When the researchers tested this filtering method on a dozen ancient bone, teeth, and hair DNA samples from 500 to 3500 years old, they gleaned twofold to 13-fold more human genetic sequence from the samples than they could have by simply sequencing the mixture the same number of times. This higher resolution yielded new information about the samples. For instance, while previously they could only say that a more than 2500-year-old Bronze Age tooth from Bulgaria was European, they could now narrow its ethnic origin down to central or southern European. The team was also able to determine that a more than 500-year-old Peruvian mummy did not have European ancestry, as Spanish explorers claimed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

Celtic pendant bracelet earrings - Antique Ancient Jewellery

Celtic pendant bracelet earrings - Antique Ancient Jewellery | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“ Celtic jewellery bracelets earrings authentic jewelry Druid Pagan Chieftain Rings - Antique Jewellery Ancient Jewelry Vintage Genuine Authentic Antiquities Roman Medieval Celtic Viking Saxon Artifacts (Pagan Druid Celtic Vintage Jewellery Used L”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

Listen to The Iliad In Ancient Greek

Listen to The Iliad In Ancient Greek | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“ Between yesterday's post about a Shakespeare iPad app and this post, I'm on a bit of a classical literature kick. Last night I listened to part of The Iliad in ancient Greek.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: The Ancient Greeks and the Formation of Man.

Carl Jung Depth Psychology: The Ancient Greeks and the Formation of Man. | Aztecs | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Emily Wirth from Archaeology News
Scoop.it!

Ancient ruined cities that remain a mystery

Ancient ruined cities that remain a mystery | Aztecs | Scoop.it

CRUMBLING walls. Breathtaking temples. Mysterious cities built entirely underground.

They are the astounding feats of architecture that have been left to decay for centuries.

But while they may be in ruins, the sites of the world's most ancient and intriguing cities continue to wow travellers.

From the popular Machu Picchu site in Peru, to the Pompeii ruins and the lesser-known Derinkuyu site in Turkey, here are eight amazing ruined cities that remain shrouded in mystery - or remain perplexing to this day, according to the science website io9.com.

One thing's for sure, the world is a fascinating place.

 

starts with :

1. Palenque, Mexico

 

 


Via David Connolly
more...
Sarah Kerr's curator insight, October 10, 2013 11:15 PM

This scoop has a lot of great interesting facts on ancient cities that are now long forgotten but still widely popular in the traveling world. Some of the cities we are studying in class such as Catal Huyuk and Pompeii show up in this article.

Cassandra Folkerth's curator insight, October 16, 2013 1:24 AM

I love reading about the ancient architecture. Its just so cool. How did tehy come up with that and build ALL that without any modern technology.

Sarah Kerr's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:25 PM

I chose this scoop because, it is fascinating to think that there are places out there in the world that are full of mystery and unanswered questions. The places mentioned in this article are,  Great ZImbabwe, Cahokia in the U.S., Machu Pichu in Peru, Catalhoyuk in Turkey, Pompeii in Italy,  Palenqus in Mexico and Derinkuyu also in Turkey. 

Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

Old Spansh route to be rebuilt at Aztec Ruins - KOB.com

Old Spansh route to be rebuilt at Aztec Ruins - KOB.com | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“Old Spansh route to be rebuilt at Aztec Ruins KOB.com The Aztec Ruins National Monument is a big tourist attraction in the Four Corners, and near the national monument lies a historic trade route.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

A Remarkable New View of Ancient Druidic Science - M.J. Rose

A Remarkable New View of Ancient Druidic Science - M.J. Rose | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“ The Ancient Paths: Discovering the Lost Map of Celtic Europe, review. Tim Martin has his eyes opened by an enthralling new history that argues that Druids created a sophisticated ancient society to rival the Romans.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

CPP History Professor reads ancient language - The Poly Post

CPP History Professor reads ancient language - The Poly Post | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“ CPP History Professor reads ancient language The Poly Post At a university such as Cal Poly Pomona, where the philosophy is “learn by doing,” there are numerous hands-on, scholarly and well-qualified faculty members who teach and mentor their...”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

Allure of Mexico's Aztec - Vancouver Sun

Allure of Mexico's Aztec - Vancouver Sun | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“Vancouver Sun Allure of Mexico's Aztec Vancouver Sun Although Teotihuacan was actually built some 2,100 years ago by a pre-Aztec civilization, it was easy to see why the Aztecs venerated and continued to use the 83-square-kilometre city for rituals.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

#News: Finally know Pyramids in Atlantis Aztec ...

#News: Finally know Pyramids in Atlantis Aztec ... | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“ #News: Finally know Pyramids in Atlantis Aztec Egypt China Indonesia and the Lost Eden http://t.co/EcXqceUfpn (If you like the news please visit the rest of my news sites, and news summary sites. also if you get tired of the...”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

Ancient Seikilos Column brings world's oldest song back to life - NEWS.com.au

Ancient Seikilos Column brings world's oldest song back to life - NEWS.com.au | Aztecs | Scoop.it
“ Ancient Seikilos Column brings world's oldest song back to life NEWS.com.au Securely housed in the National Museum of Denmark, the marble column has now been "played" once more through the efforts of ancient music researcher Michael Levy and...”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Wirth
Scoop.it!

Ancient DNA opens Aztec 'cold case' | Futurity

Ancient DNA opens Aztec 'cold case' | Futurity | Aztecs | Scoop.it
University of Texas at Austin rightOriginal Study. Posted by Jessica Sinn-Texas on January 31, 2013. Ancient DNA opens Aztec 'cold case'. U. TEXAS-AUSTIN (US) — DNA recovered from human remains suggests the Aztec conquest of ...
Emily Wirth's insight:

A graduate student of Anthropology tracked the "Otomí people following the incorporation of Xaltocan into the Aztec empire".

more...
No comment yet.