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A Look at the Future Fibre to the Distribution Point FTTdp Broadband Tech | ISPreview UK

A Look at the Future Fibre to the Distribution Point FTTdp Broadband Tech | ISPreview UK | az. ret ret | Scoop.it
Over the next few years it’s likely that you’ll soon start to hear more about a next generation broadband ISP technology called Fibre to the Distribution Point (FTTdp), which Ofcom are currently encouraging BT to trial. But what is FTTdp and will it really help UK homes and businesses to get ultrafast internet connections? Let’s take a look.BT are currently rolling out two primary fibre optic based broadband technologies, Fibre-to-the-Premises (FTTP/H) and Fibre-to-the-Cabinet (FTTC). In simple terms, FTTP takes the fibre optic cable right into your home for the most stable and best possible speeds (1000Mbps+ capable), while FTTC only takes the fibre to your local street cabinet and then uses VDSL2 over the “last mile” run of existing copper cable into your home for speeds of up to 80Mbps.Unfortunately deploying FTTP out to everybody would probably cost another £10bn to £20bn (estimates vary) and that’s simply not economically viable for BT. It is however possible to get FTTP-on-Demand (FoD) but this forces home owners and businesses into potentially paying thousands of pounds for the installation; it’s not an affordable option.The government, short of scrapping the HS2 project, aren’t likely to help either. But this leaves most of us stuck with FTTC technology (except for Virgin Media’s cable in urban areas), which is significantly slower and very distance dependent due to its reliance on copper for the “last mile” (i.e. speeds decline the further you are away from a street cabinet).Not that FTTC is bad and indeed the service is affordable, easy to setup and currently delivers superfast broadband (30Mbps+) speeds to most of those who use it. Similarly there are a number of innovations in the pipeline, such as Vectoring technology (summer 2013 trial details), that could soon help to improve its performance and push headline speeds above 100Mbps. In addition Vectoring (ITU-T G.993.5), which works to remove interference on FTTC/VDSL lines, is also necessary for G.Fast (ITU-T G.9700) to function properly (explained below).Never the less there’s always room for improvement and that’s one of the reasons why BT has recently started casting its eye towards G.Fast and FTTdp technology, which are effectively two halves of the same coin and work best together. G.Fast is essentially the next evolution of FTTC technology, which in theory could one day deliver symmetric speeds of up to 1Gbps (Alcatel-Lucent’s trial details).Click headline to read more--
Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Twitter / Sais_tu_: Voici à quoi ressemble une ...

Twitter / Sais_tu_: Voici à quoi ressemble une ... | az. ret ret | Scoop.it
“RT @Sais_tu_: Voici à quoi ressemble une plage quand elle est agrandie 250 fois. http://t.co/14rg0lchsz”;
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Rescooped by Michel from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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G.fast - New ITU-T Standard for 1Gbps Broadband | Fiber Optic Mania

G.fast - New ITU-T Standard for 1Gbps Broadband | Fiber Optic Mania | az. ret ret | Scoop.it
ITU-T Study Group 15 discussed at Geneva about G.fast, the new ITU-T standard for broadband using optical fiber network and copper wires already existing to the home. G.fast is the new broadband standard that promises up to 1 Gbps over existing copper wires. As per the standard, copper network distance from distribution point to subscriber's home could be up to 250 and still will be able to deliver broadband speeds of up to 1 Gbps.
The ITU meeting gave first stage approval of ITU standard, Recommendation ITU-T G.9700, that specifies methods to minimize the risk of G.fast equipment interfering with broadcast services such as FM radio, paving the way for G.fast to be approved in early 2014. The new G.fast standard is being coordinated with the Broadband Forum’s system architecture project, Fiber to the Distribution Point (FTTdp). The ITU-T and Broadband Forum have been working closely to ensure that G.fast solutions can be quickly placed into FTTdp deployments.
More and more service providers may use G.fast to deliver broadband services to the homes that already have copper connection. One of the most attractive characteristics that this standard put forward is the installation by subscribers. Subscribers do not need to wait for service provider's technicians. Thus G.fast provides faster installation and cost saving for both service providers and subscribers.
Click headline to read more--

Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Michel from Fiber Arts
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Patchwork Quilt Brown and Green on Handmade Artists' Shop

Patchwork Quilt Brown and Green on Handmade Artists' Shop | az. ret ret | Scoop.it
“ This is just the quilt that I want to cuddle up in and read a book. The colors are mainly brown and green. The flowers are fun with dots in the brown. The diagonal look just adds to the modern yet traditional quilt.”
Via Nippy Hook
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Real-Time Messaging for Meteor With Meteor Streams

Real-Time Messaging for Meteor With Meteor Streams | az. ret ret | Scoop.it
This is 2013. If you are going to build a webapp, you must add real-time capabilities to the app. It is the standard. Meteor does a pretty good job at helping you to quickly build and make apps real-time. But meteor is tightly coupled with MongoDB and it is the only way to add real-time capabilities. Sometimes, this is overkill. MongoDB is a perfect match for Meteor. But we don’t need to use MongoDB for all our real-time activities. For some problems, messaging based solutions work really well. It’s the same problem that pubnub andreal-time.co are also addressing.
Via Jan Hesse
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