Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest
All the latest trends and headlines in UXD and human-computer interactions
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Improving the Usability of Your Website | Vandelay Design Blog

Improving the Usability of Your Website | Vandelay Design Blog | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it

The term “Usability” scares me. It’s a small word with a very large meaning. In context of websites, an entire industry has formed – called User Experience (UX) – around the idea of improving how visitors to your site can interact and consume the content. If you can make it easy to find what they’re looking for, they’re more likely to hang around and continue reading/watching/interacting. Such a huge impact for such an ordinary word. In light of the big implications of usability, this article discusses some of the higher level concepts around UX, and in doing so gives you some practical steps to improve the usability of your site today.

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Rating the Severity of Usability Problems: Measuring Usability

Rating the Severity of Usability Problems: Measuring Usability | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it

If only one out of 1000 users encounters a problem with a website, then it's a minor problem.If that sentence bothered you, it should. It could be that that single problem resulted in one visitor's financial information inadvertently being posted to the website for the world to see.  

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How to approach usability testing

How to approach usability testing | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it

In order to deliver a clean, fresh, and — more importantly — effective user interface, usability tests are required. It is very unlikely any designer, regardless of his reputation and skills, will be able to design a good product without doing some kind of research and testing.


Usability testing is a technique used for evaluating a product by testing it on users who are part of the respective target audience. Testing is used in many fields, but today we will focus on user-centered interaction design and how to test when designing and developing such a product.


Every product has an intended purpose, and the scope and aim of usability testing is measuring if a product meets this purpose with regards to a user.

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Improving Usability With Extra Navigation Keys

Improving Usability With Extra Navigation Keys | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it

When handling keyboard events in JavaScript, most scripts and applications tend to stick to the basic range of keys that provide core accessibility — the Tab key for serial navigation, the Arrow keys for drilling-down or for two-dimensional navigation, and the Enter and Space keys for clicking and selecting things.


This is all good, but there are some other common keys you might consider as well, that can significantly improve usability by providing more control — the Page-up and Page-down keys can be used for fast navigation over large groups of data, while the Home and End keys can be used as shortcuts to the first and last value.

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The New Room Effect: Usability Is About Comfort | SpyreStudios

The New Room Effect: Usability Is About Comfort | SpyreStudios | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
Over the years, I have read probably hundreds of usability tips and tricks. They all seem to give generally decent advice that are all blanket statements about usability.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

Over the years, I have read probably hundreds of usability tips and tricks. They all seem to give generally decent advice that are all blanket statements about usability. Such things as “Use a sans-serif” or “Make sure to minimize scrolling” are common among these lists.

 

I am not here to tell you these are wrong, but relying on general usability guidelines without context, understanding, or goals can be a horrible pitfall when designing. Usability is not about the shortest route between two points. It’s also not about being so simple it’s insulting. Usability should be about comfort, enjoyability, familiarity, and positive recall.

 

Simplicity is not the solution

Simple is actually an extremely subjective concept. For instance, Windows file management is simple to me. On the other hand for my parents, it is quite daunting. The main idea is that we must realize as designers that we are inherently experts at using interfaces. This means that our concept of what is simple can be horribly out of sync with our audiences. The result of this is that when we try to make our interfaces simple we either overcompensate and make the design insulting or we overestimate what elements are obvious. 

 

The common user is not dumb.  Instead, they are generally just more ignorant of technology than designers or techies. For example, my father is a builder. He can look at any house or structure and immediately point out problems, weak points, and issues. However, he constantly has questions and problems with Yahoo! Mail and Microsoft Word.

 

This doesn’t mean that the programs need to be mind-numbingly stripped down or that he needs giant buttons to complete tasks. I know this, because on a car website, he is blazing through it: saving and e-mailing pictures, bookmarking and so on. The common user just has a different context. The faster we can address the confusing or unfamiliar elements and make them feel good about using our interface the more successful we will be.


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There Is No Mobile Internet! | Smashing Magazine

There Is No Mobile Internet! | Smashing Magazine | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
Why we need to forget the idea of a mobile Internet and start thinking about how to create seamless online communications instead, irrespective of device.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

It’s time to stop thinking about the Internet and online communication in the context of a device, be it desktop, tablet or mobile. Advances by Google and Apple have heightened consumer expectations, which now require stricter focus from us to create seamless online communications — communications that work everywhere and that get their point across. We need to embrace a device-agnostic approach to communicating with connected consumers and forget the idea of a “mobile Internet”. There is only One Web to experience.

 

A Quiet Change

At the beginning of June, Google published on its Webmaster Central Blog its “Recommendations for Building Smartphone-Optimized Websites.” Its recommendations are that responsiveness — or, where necessary, device-specific HTML — is the way to build websites for today. Both methods are based on all devices accessing one URL, which in Google’s words makes it “easier for your users to interact with, share, and link to…”

 

Following the recommendation means making most of your Web content accessible across devices. It ensures that each link shared across the Web leads back to the same place and that, irrespective of the user’s device, everyone gets the same design experience. It aims to standardize Web design approaches, but also to standardize user experience expectations.

 

Shortly after, Apple announced a lot of thrilling updates to iOS 6. One of the least talked about was Safari’s iCloud tabs. This syncs your open browser tabs and allows you to continue browsing from where you left off on another device. Google’s recent version of Chrome for iOS has the same feature. The result? The ultimate cross-media surfing experience, a digital doggy bag.

 

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Mobile Web Design: 5 Tips to Improve Usability @medianovak

Mobile Web Design: 5 Tips to Improve Usability @medianovak | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
Mobile Web Design: This article contains a set of rules which in our opinion should be kept in mind when developing the mobile version of a website.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

Mobile Web Design | Despite the fact that there are approximately 1.2 billion mobile web users worldwide, some websites are still a usability nightmare when accessed via mobile devices. The fragmentation of the mobile device market – with a relatively wide array of device – resolution – operating system combination has further complicated matters.

 

There can be many reasons that explain why usable websites become unusable when accessed via mobile devices. This article contains a set of rules which in our opinion should be kept in mind when designing and developing the mobile version of a website. These rules are by no means exhaustive but they should lead to you key areas for further research. So, here we go ….

 

Mobile Web Design Rule 1: Know Your Users

The mobile version of your website should be adapted for your user and not the other way round! A recent article on this blog highlighted this by explaining how to know your readers and write usable blog posts for them. Knowing your users is essential as otherwise it is practically impossible to design a mobile website which provides the best platform for interaction. There are many ways which can help you build a profile of your typical user. I particularly find useful traditional methodologies such as conducting online questionnaires and polls. However, I have also obtained valuable user information via web analytics and usability testing tools. I consider knowing your user and identifying what your typical user wants from you as the first step in any web development project.

 

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Usability vs User Experience Design : How Do They Relate To Each Other?

Usability vs User Experience Design : How Do They Relate To Each Other? | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
Usability vs User Experience Design While many aspects of the Usability and User Experience are subjective, it is more science than art. It’s all about helping users to easily get things done in your web or mobile product.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

While many aspects of the Usability and User Experience are subjective, it is more science than art. It’s all about helping users to easily get things done in your web or mobile product. While you cannot engineer a product to makes people happy, surprised, or curious, you can certainly optimize for consistency, accessibility, speed and simplicity. User experience can also address how users discover your product out in the wild, how they remember it, and any intangible/emotional impact that arises from its use. In other words, UX (user experience) requires you to think about both on and off-screen dimensions of design.

Usability plays a major role in determining the UX. Usability is nothing but how simple and more attractive the design is. It should not be cluttered and a frustrating one. Simply, the Usability and User Experience should relate the target audience of your product.

The other two factors that go hand in hand with usability to determine the UX are: reliability and speed. Reliability is that the site supports all browsers (Cross Browser Reliability). At times there are sites which are designed and tested on Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox, which are the most popular browsers; these same sites may not be supported by the Internet Explorer which, a study shows, is used by 16.2% of the people familiar to the Internet. If so, then the customers will get disappointed. So designing according to the targeted audience as well as the browsers that they are using is of great importance.

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10 Great Reasons To Usability Test

10 Great Reasons To Usability Test | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
Looking for some reasons to run usability tests? Read this post for 10 top reasons you should be usability testing.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

For all the tips I give on usability testing, explanations of how to get started, the reviews of different services I do, I get a very large number of people asking me why they should actually test in the first place (as if those examples weren’t enough!).


Today I’d like to present (in no particular order) a quick post on 10 reasons that everyone should perform usability testing. Read on to see a few reasons I think you should run usability tests, and be sure to add your own reasons in the comments below.


1) Improve usability

It (should) goes without saying, usability testing will improve the usability of your sites, apps, user interface, or whatever else you are designing. Imagine publishing a magazine or newspaper without having an editor read it first; that’s effectively what you are doing by launching a site without usability testing.

Usability testing will show up all those little navigation and ui problems, will help you discover all sorts of tweaks you can make, and will give you a whole new understanding of how users interact with your site or app – extremely valuable information to have at your fingertips.


2) Improve user experience

Following on from improved usability is an improved user experience. If users have to spend too much time looking for your ‘add to cart’ or ‘subscribe by RSS‘ button they simply won’t bother. After implementing the results of your testing, you will remove the vast majority of these issues for the vast majority of your users, and they will enjoy using your site or app so much more because of it.


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Designing In and Around the Windows 8 Ecosystem | UX Magazine

Designing In and Around the Windows 8 Ecosystem | UX Magazine | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

The release of Windows 8 has disturbed the current ecosystem of designing for device-specific platforms. Fortunately, instead of asking users to learn three different digital experiences (phone, tablet, browser), the latest operating system attempts to bridge that gap by creating a hybrid space that users can explore as a single unit from different devices.

 

As is typical with a system revamp, there’s been confusion among both consumers and third-party designers. These two groups must commit to learning new rules and tools in order to quickly acclimate.

 

In theory, this move by Microsoft lowers the user’s burden by creating one standard location for many important tools that traditional websites have placed in different areas and hierarchies. However, in practice, the implementation of a universal tool set in a consistent location has not been entirely successful.

 

Another major shift is the introduction of a primarily horizontal layout, which disrupts the current mental model for users accustomed to a primarily vertical space on smartphones and e-readers. This affects more than the aesthetics. It also introduces challenges to the way users interact with content across different platforms. Careful consideration should be given to how much room there will be to interact with smaller touch spaces with on-screen keyboards and, conversely, what parameters should be set for larger monitors in order to reduce user burden in the distance it takes for the eye or hand to travel between targets.

 

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How To Use Email To Alienate Your Users | Smashing Magazine

How To Use Email To Alienate Your Users | Smashing Magazine | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
This article looks at what spam actually is and why email marketing can be a wonderful tool not just for you but for your subscribers, too.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

Spam! Monty Python may love it, but the rest of us are not so convinced. But what is spam? Are you spamming users without realizing it? And is there any place in the world for email marketing?

 

Most of us have a love/hate relationship with email. Its one of those necessary evils. Nowhere is our relationship with email more confused than when it comes to spam.

 

For a start, spam is hard to define. Google defines it as:

Sending the same message indiscriminately to (large numbers of recipients) on the Internet.

 

But what does that actually mean? The truth is, what one person considers acceptable, another could hate with a loathing.

 

Without a clear definition of acceptable and unacceptable behavior, it becomes easy for email marketing to alienate users, rather than win them over.

 

The Benefits Of Email Marketing

Done right, email marketing can be a wonderful tool, not just for you but for your subscribers, too.

 

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Eight UX Design Trends for 2013 | UX Magazine

Eight UX Design Trends for 2013 | UX Magazine | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

One of the best things about user experience design is that the consumer products and services it helps to crystallize are always evolving. With that level of change comes all sorts of speculation about the future.

 

Speculating is fun. Looking back on 2012 we saw a year brimming with innovations and ideas that set the stage for what we are likely to see in 2013. With that, here are some trends and concepts that we see setting the stage for this year’s coming advancements in user experience.

 

Downsampling

 

The Onion hit it spot-on when they joked that 90% of our waking lives are spent staring at glowing rectangles. Along with more screens in our lives, the volume and intensity of information that passes through these rectangles has also been increasing: more widgets, more animations, more feeds, more dimensions, more data. In 2013 we envision a counterbalancing trend towards digital abstractions—a compressive reduction of dense information sets into radically simplified communications and visualizations.

 

Little Printer skims headlines from your online feeds and spits them out as low-fi ticker tape for your bedside. Robotify.me creates a personalized avatar that morphs based on the quantity, quality, and content of your aggregated social media activity. And the lovably crude, Etch A Sketch-esque PopSlate case uses e-ink to display simplified content pulled from your smartphone on the backside of the device. This year, look for technology that pares down functionality and operates at the edge, rather than the center of your attention

 

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10 Things to Know About Unmoderated Usability Testing: Measuring Usability

10 Things to Know About Unmoderated Usability Testing: Measuring Usability | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it

One of the biggest barriers to conducting usability testing is the cost and time involved in testing.


Moderators have to bring users to a dedicated location, test each one (usually one at a time), and only then get results from only a handful of users.


Unmoderated usability testing is a technique using software such as from Userzoom or Loop11 to administer tasks and questions without the need of a facilitator.


Here are 10 things to know about this essential usability testing method that's reducing the cost and improving the frequency of usability testing.


1) It's growing: According to the latest User Experience Professionals Associate Survey in 2011, around 23% of respondents report using unmoderated testing (compared to 52% using lab-based testing). This has shown growth of 28% since 2009 when 18% of respondents used it. The method wasn't even listed as an option in 2007!


2) Recruiting is a lot easier: Jakob Nielsen calls it "unglamorous" and Steve Krug says he's not very fond of it in "Rocket Surgery Made Easy." Finding qualified participants is hard but necessary. Fortunately, for unmoderated tests, it's a bit easier to find both more users and more specialized users through a variety of approaches.


You can use panel companies like OP4G and Toluna, which are able to recruit and send users to your study or you can pull users right off of a website. When we use intercepts to recruit off of websites we typically see a much higher attrition rate than when we use panel companies. In general, we like to include both types in our unmoderated studies as they help provide a good mix of data from current users to prospective users.


3) Survey + Usability Study: We often start a project and have vague business questions to work with: Do customers understand our unique selling points? What do we change in our checkout form? Is our new homepage design better? We operationalize these questions into testable hypotheses, and use a mix of tasks and traditional survey questions. This allows us to examine both attitudes and action. Sometimes, it's the percentage of users who click on a navigation element. Other times, it's the answer to a question about how few users understood a concept that becomes most insightful.


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Website Navigation: 4 Tips for Maximum Usability

Website Navigation: 4 Tips for Maximum Usability | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it

Here’s a conversion optimization metaphor for you…

If your website were a building, hyperlinks would be the doors.

What does that mean? You don’t want people to get stuck anywhere on your website. So you should always make sure they know how to get from place to place easily and efficiently. This article will discuss the four primary pathways by which users get places on your site… and tell you how to optimize these pathways for maximum impact.

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Website Usability Tools You Could Be Using - Expert Usability

Website Usability Tools You Could Be Using - Expert Usability | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it

While a lot of website usability issues can be found through individual analysis, there are a number of tools to help you automate the discovery process of finding issues on your own site.


The problem is there are so many tools to choose from, it can be hard to narrow down the choices. On top of that, most of the website usability tool lists out there just list ALL of the available tools, even if many of those tools have duplicate functionality.


So what's an overwhelmed person to do when they have a website that has issues, but they don't have the time to research all the tools to find what will help them the most?

Tyler Borosavage's insight:

This is a great post showing several types of usability tools to improve your website. 

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10 Ways to Improve Your Website Usability

10 Ways to Improve Your Website Usability | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it

Many marketers will tell you that no matter how good your website design is, if it is hard for your readers to understand what it is all about, you are literally leaving a huge pile of money on the table. When I used to sell websites as a telemarketer – give me a break, you’ve got to start somewhere – I always heard my coworker say “But if you have a $20,000 website and nobody goes to it, you might as well fold it up and put it in your back pocket.” Well, I hate to say it but he’s right and that directly translates to usability.


The good news however is that improving the usability of your website is not rocket science. You don’t even need to know code or any of that other technical stuff to give your users an enhanced experience.

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Five Ways To Prevent Bad Microcopy | Smashing UX Design

Five Ways To Prevent Bad Microcopy | Smashing UX Design | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it

You’ve just created the best user experience ever. You had the idea. You sketched it out. You started to build it. Except you’re already in trouble, because you’ve forgotten something: the copy. Specifically, the microcopy.


Microcopy is the text we don’t talk about very often. It’s the label on a form field, a tiny piece of instructional text, or the words on a button. It’s the little text that can make or break your user experience.

Tyler Borosavage's insight:

Don't let personal bias, internal terminology, and poor branding undermine your UX design. Follow these five tips to preventing bad microcopy. 

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Why and How to Build a UI Pattern Library - EffectiveUI Blog

Why and How to Build a UI Pattern Library - EffectiveUI Blog | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

As a front-end designer or developer, managing today’s complex web, mobile-web, and multi-device digital ecosystems can become a nightmare. Since you’re often responsible for keeping your designs and code base in line for reuse over the duration of a project (and probably long after its completion), it is important to consider building a UI pattern library – one that makes developing apps and websites easier and allows for consistency across multiple devices.

 

Is a UI pattern library right for me?

Well, it depends. On the plus side, a UI pattern library offers a one-stop asset and code shop for designers and developers, encourages collaboration between disparate teams, and establishes a common design language. On the other hand, it can be a large time investment if you’re starting from scratch, and may limit “out-of-the box” thinking in the future.

 

If you’re simply designing a single app for the Apple iPad paired with a marketing landing page for the web, a UI pattern library is probably overkill. However, if you have several large disparate teams designing a suite of apps, each having their own desktop web experiences associated with them, perhaps you should consider having one.

 

Choosing the right type of pattern library What, there’s more than one type? Actually, there are three. Developer-centric pattern libraries such as YUI Library and Prototype UI, focus on quick code production turnover. Designer-centric pattern libraries – including Welie Interaction Design Patterns, Endeca UI Design Pattern Library, Yahoo! Design Patterns, and Pattern Tap – emphasize problem solving through general UI recommendations. The third type combines both, allowing developers and designers to work in tandem (this is the type I recommend; try Foundation or Twitter’s Bootstrap).


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Which Comes First: Functional or Usability Testing?

Which Comes First: Functional or Usability Testing? | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
To be clear, this post is not about whether functional testing is more important than usability testing, or vice versa.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

To be clear, this post is not about whether functional testing is more important than usability testing, or vice versa. That’s like asking your parents whether they love you or your brother more; there’s no right answer. The better debate, in my opinion, is about which one should come first and why. And while some may throw the chicken and the egg debate into the argument, or argue that functional testing is the starting point of developing good software, I hope to convince you that usability testing should always come first.

 

To play devil’s advocate for a moment, I agree that you cannot ‘fully test’ usability without partially-written code that invokes user feedback. Using this argument of developing bits and pieces of the app first, you would then need to test its functionality prior to its usability and user experience – that makes sense. However, let’s borrow an analogy from the world of construction for a minute. Do construction workers lay out a building’s foundation before referencing a set of blueprints and guidelines? And do building blueprints stem from the whim of an architect? The answer to both is a resounding no.

 

So how does this analogy relate to testing? Well, just as specs are typically developed before a single line of code is written, usability testing should begin well before specs are developed – typically in the requirements-gathering phase of your SDLC. This type of usability testing, however, may not be what comes to mind when you first think of usability testing. Instead of interacting with a complete or partially-developed app, usability testing at this level can begin with digital or pen and paper wire-framing. It can also begin with A/B mockups and intended workflows that can be test-driven by a set of end users. Inputs from your users at this point in the SDLC can better inform where to even begin with design and workflows of your app. In other words, move your usability testing further upstream to minimize potential reworking of code downstream. This enables you to minimize time spent on reworking design and code, or even worse, sticking with poor usability because of time and cost constraints.

 

 

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Where Does Good User Experience Come From?

Where Does Good User Experience Come From? | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
We all know that when it comes to developing enterprise solutions, good user experience (UX) doesn't happen by accident. In fact, it can be downright elusive.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

We all know that when it comes to developing enterprise solutions, good user experience (UX) doesn't happen by accident. In fact, it can be downright elusive. The interesting thing about UX is that the better it is, the less likely you are to notice it — when is the last time you thought, “Wow, that was such a satisfying digital experience!”?

 

It is far more likely that you can recall a variety of frustrations — thousands of irrelevant results returned in a simple search or a site navigation that you’d have to be psychic to maneuver.

 

Why do so many enterprise solutions get UX wrong? And how can you make sure you get it right? I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about these two questions recently and over the next several months we will spend a lot of time talking about UX and the enterprise. Let’s take a look at some of these concepts around UX and getting started with a project.

It’s Harder than it Looks

While there are some universal principles of good UX (design should be simple and intuitive; similar objects should be grouped together; designs and navigations should be consistent; etc.), you can do all of these big things right and still miss the mark on the overall UX.

 

Why? Because it is very possible that you are focusing on solving the wrong problems.

 

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Lead Your UX Team like Phil Jackson | UX Magazine

Lead Your UX Team like Phil Jackson | UX Magazine | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

Leading a team of talented UX professionals is no easy task. Managing all that creative energy and the egos that go with it; figuring out ways to give everyone their desired level of input while keeping it relative to the project at hand; and having the success of the team define your job security are all part and parcel. Despite how insurmountable this all sounds, there’s another profession with similar challenges on an exploded scale: the NBA coach.


NBA coaches have to wrangle prima donna players, crazed fans, owners who views championships as the only measure of success, and a staff that will never be the same two seasons in a row. In addition, if a season isn't going well the coach might get fired midway through. Can you imagine getting axed in the middle of a project because your team missed a deadline? Youch!


Despite this wild myriad of obstacles, there's one coach who has been successful over and over again: the great Phil Jackson. Jackson is widely considered the greatest coach ever, and his 11 championships (three of them three-peats and another two back-to-back) and 13 NBA Finals appearances back that reputation up. So what can UX leads learn from the great Zen master?


Take Indirect Approaches to Solve Team Chemistry Issues

When your teams consist of Hall of Fame talent like Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, Dennis Rodman, Kobe Bryant, and Shaquille O'Neal there are bound to be chemistry issues. Where most coaches would solve this by implementing mandatory meetings for players to learn to enjoy each other, Jackson did it best by taking indirect approaches.


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5 Tips for Conquering the "Content Paradigm"

5 Tips for Conquering the "Content Paradigm" | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
People don't just want good content; they want the Cliffs Notes version of good content.

Online readers have about an 8-second attention span, so if it takes 10 seconds to read about your business idea, then you're toast.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:
1. Cut it out

Don't be afraid to take out words or even paragraphs. Always be editing. Simplify your idea to a sentence, then shorten it. The plethora of ideas and fancy words about your company are probably awesome and wonderful; in fact, I'm sure I'd love to read about it, but not online. Please, save the minute details for your memoir.

 

2. Give Me a break

Nothing's worse than landing on a page full of smashed-together paragraphs. If you've followed the first tip, then your paragraphs shouldn't be long to begin with, but also make sure that you give the reader's eyes a break. Double space some paragraphs, or add an image between ideas.

 

3. Let me navigate

An interesting trend, especially in cause-based and fact-heavy sites, is allowing the user to complete an animated story by scrolling. The technique is effective in getting the user to read your content because they want to see what happens next, and they can set the pace.

 

4. emphasize

Emphasize important points on your site by bolding them, putting them in a box, or making the font bigger. I am not suggesting that you have blinking or overly colorful text, these are website no-no's.

 

5. lead me there

Say everything about the paragraph in your first sentence, then add the details in the body. You might consider having titles for your paragraphs or even a "learn more" button.

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5 Organizational Tips to Improve Website Usability

5 Organizational Tips to Improve Website Usability | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
When it comes to building websites, organization is key. Help increase traffic and boost ROI by following these five tips for improving website usability.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

Using the alphabet

Research has shown  that website users typically read content in an F-shaped pattern. Placing the  most important content in the upper left-hand side of each page will help make  sure that readers view what you really want them to right away, instead of  losing interest halfway down the page before they make it to the good stuff.

 

Page load time

Waiting a long time for a page to load is no  fun. Sometimes an unreliable internet connection is the only thing to blame,  but if your website is slow to load no matter where you are or what computer you  are using, a more likely culprit is the content of your site. Getting rid of  unnecessary music, videos, or banner ads can help decrease load time as well as  visitor agitation.

 

Search bars

While they can be useful on websites with a lot of backlog, search bars  shouldn’t be the go-to means of navigation on a brand new website. Organizing  content in a clear, logical way will have more visitors clicking their way  through your site rather than depending on the search bar, a process that can  ultimately boost your page ranking and visibility

 

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Meagan Cooper's curator insight, March 3, 2013 3:29 PM

Great tips if you are looking to improve your organizational skills with website usability. I believe organization is crutial when it comes to website usability so this page is excellent for beginners.

Jennifer Delorme's curator insight, March 6, 2013 1:24 PM

Five largely important tips for your website usability:
1- design of your site, F-shape viewing is typically what most user tend to use. which means top left is wheree their eyes go first and lower down they begin to lose interest.
2- fast loading times, so people dont get bored.

3- clear  organization is way more important than having a search bar on your site.

4- three click rule, if it takes more then three clicks for a user to find what they want, its too hard to find.

5- make ALL your pages not just home page, interesting and eye catching because someone may stumble upon any of them.

Sarah Miller's curator insight, March 11, 2013 11:15 AM

Found some excellent information on website usability throughout this particular article! There wasnt as much key information as i would of liked to see but there was information in here that was different compared to other articles that I previously looked at. This articles main focus is organization, it belives that organizatiokn is key, and this is something that I agree with. 

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Design Process In The Responsive Age | Smashing UX Design

Design Process In The Responsive Age | Smashing UX Design | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
You cannot plan for and design a responsive, content-focused, mobile-first website the same way you’ve been creating websites for years.
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

If your goal is to produce something that is not fixed-width and serves smaller devices just the styles they require, why would you use a dated process that contradicts those goals?

 

I’d like to walk you through some problems caused by using old processes with responsive design. Let’s look into an evolving design process we’ve 2 been using with some promising new deliverables and tools. This should provide a starting point for you to freshen up your own process and bring it into the responsive age.

 

The Problem

The issues caused when trying to force new results from an old process are significant yet, strangely enough, not immediately obvious. We’ve all just gotten used to them, like the annoying quirk we didn’t realize we had, until someone points it out. And from that point forward, it drives you crazy. For example, when we create a desktop-sized, fixed-width site layout in Photoshop and hand it to a developer to interpret into HTML/CSS, we are asking the developer to make a lot of design decisions—possibly without even realizing it. Below is just a small sample:

 

  • How should the layout adjust for smaller-sized devices? (It sure would be nice to have a hierarchy of important page elements based on their purpose, huh?)
  • What is the hierarchy of the content? (Gee, all that “Lorem Ipsum” doesn’t make it obvious?)
  • How does the navigation respond to smaller screens? (How do I handle ten links with five child pages each revealed on hover with a 320×480 touch device?!)

 

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6 User Experience Statistics You Should Pay Attention To | Usability Geek

6 User Experience Statistics You Should Pay Attention To | Usability Geek | Ayantek's User Experience Design Digest | Scoop.it
User Experience (UX) Statistics and Metrics that are useful in order to ensure that your product and/or service improves the experience of your users
Marisa Chiulli's insight:

Numbers, feedback, trends and other statistics coming from several areas which lie within and outside an organisation are factored so deeply in User Experience (UX) that they make their gathering, evaluation and the setting of action points an intricate science in and of itself. Indeed, the depth that is involved in the field of User Experience and its growing prevalence that spans through a wide range of industries can make it a daunting task to even decide which statistics are worth gathering and analyzing let alone how to analyse them and decide on what corrective measures to take based on their analysis.

 

The difficulty lies not only in the ability to cull the important statistics from the more superfluous ones but also on deciding how much is necessary. This is the headache that User Experience experts, and those in other related fields, must contend with on a regular basis. And to make it even worse, there are no set of rules that specifically state which statistics you need to pay attention to. We can depend upon nothing but the learned experience and wisdom of User Experience professionals who have seen enough success and failure in their careers to know what they are talking about.

 

What pearls of wisdom have these sages to impart, then? What statistics have they time and again seen to matter the most?

 

Frequently, Customer Relationship Management (CRM) seems to be one of the biggest source of statistics that contains useful values which are closely related to User Experience. More specifically, CRM is composed of at least three statistics – all of which are important for User Experience. This makes Customer Relationship Management the primary factor to watch. The three factors that comprise CRM are the:

 

  • 1. Rate of Questions Asked
  • 2. Rate of Problems Reported
  • 3. Overall Resolution of the Above Two


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