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List of Running Man episodes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of Running Man episodes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

If more than one set of teams are used other than the Race Mission teams, they are divided and distinguished to the corresponding mission under Teams. Team members are listed in alphabetical order from Team Leader, to Members, to Guests.

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Be careful– A Grammar Glitch can spread like a virus! « Grammar ...

Be careful– A Grammar Glitch can spread like a virus! « Grammar ... | axe ... | Scoop.it
Be careful– A Grammar Glitch can spread like a virus! A friend who does a lot of editing sent along this example of a classic dangling modifier: Named for its natural freshwater waterhole, thirsty travelers have been visiting ...
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The Magic of Grammar

The Magic of Grammar | axe ... | Scoop.it
Glamor/Glamour: a magical or fictitious beauty attaching to any person or object; a delusive or alluring charm. Outside a rarified environment like an online site frequented by people who find it fascinating, what could have less glamor than grammar?

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, November 23, 2013 1:34 AM

Glamor/Glamour: a magical or fictitious beauty attaching to any person or object; a delusive or alluring charm.

Perhaps glamor is in the eye of the beholder, but in general, some things are felt to have it and others not. For example:

Names: Marilyn Monroe vs. Norma Jean Baker.
Occupations: actor vs. plumber.
Fields of study: psychology vs. grammar.

Outside a rarified environment like an online site frequented by people who find it fascinating, what could have less glamor than grammar?

Etymologically speaking, however, grammar and glamor are sisters under the skin.

Scotsman Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) achieved international fame with his novels, many of which were set in his native Scotland and featured dialogue sprinkled with Scots dialect. One of the expressions he introduced to standard English was “to cast the glamour.” He was not the only literary Scotsman to include a bit of dialect in their writing. Here are OED citations from two of Scott’s countrymen: