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Rescooped by Jennifer Gunawan from Indonésie
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Indonésie: au moins 15 morts après l'éruption du volcan Sinabung - monde - Actualités sur orange.fr

Indonésie: au moins 15 morts après l'éruption du volcan Sinabung - monde - Actualités sur orange.fr | Aware | Scoop.it
Les recherches de survivants ont été vaines dimanche au pied du volcan indonésien Sinabung, après une nuée ardente qui a englouti 15 personnes et laissé un paysage apocalyptique où le seul signe de vie était un téléphone portable sonnant dans le vide.

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Rescooped by Jennifer Gunawan from Nature enviroment and life.
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Top 10 Endangered Animals - Top10Zen

Top 10 Endangered Animals - Top10Zen | Aware | Scoop.it
The world is home to some truly awe-inspiring and beautiful creatures. Sadly however, some of these unique species are threatened by a number of forces such as loss of habitat, poaching and climate change.

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Rescooped by Jennifer Gunawan from No Such Thing As The News
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Man, 66, goes to doctor and finds he's a woman

Man, 66, goes to doctor and finds he's a woman | Aware | Scoop.it
A 66-year-old apparently male patient made a stunning discovery when he sought treatment for swelling in his abdomen. The swelling was a cyst on his ovary and he was in fact a woman....

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anarchic_teapot's comment, June 11, 2013 9:59 AM
He's not a woman, he's intersex. I do wish people would get things like this right.
Rescooped by Jennifer Gunawan from Science&Nature
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Mindscapes: The man who needs to paralyse himself - health - 30 May 2013 - New Scientist

"I have attempted to break my back, but I missed. I need to be paraplegic, paralysed from the waist down."

Sean O'Connor is a very rational man. But he also tried, unsuccessfully, to sever his spine, and still feels a need to be paralysed.

Sean has body integrity identity disorder (BIID), which causes him to feel that his limbs just don't belong to his body.

Sean's legs function correctly and he has full sensation in them, but they feel disconnected from him. "I don't hate my limbs – they just feel wrong," he says. "I'm aware that they are as nature designed them to be, but there is an intense discomfort at being able to feel my legs and move them."

The cause of his disorder has yet to be pinpointed, but it almost certainly stems from a problem in the early development of his brain. "My earliest memories of feeling I should be paralysed go back to when I was 4 or 5 years old," says Sean.

The first case of BIID was reported in the 18th century, when a French surgeon was held at gunpoint by an Englishman who demanded that one of his legs be removed. The surgeon, against his will, performed the operation. Later, he received a handsome payment from the Englishman, with an accompanying letter of thanks for removing "a limb which put an invincible obstacle to my happiness" (Experimental Brain Research, DOI: 10.1007/s00221-009-2043-7).

We now think that there are at least two forms of BIID. In one, people wish that part of their body were paralysed. Another form causes people to want to have a limb removed. BIID doesn't have to affect limbs either – there have been anecdotal accounts of people wishing they were blind or deaf.

 

 


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Why And How You Should Practice Mental Fitness

Why And How You Should Practice Mental Fitness | Aware | Scoop.it
Before going on with the importance of mental fitness, let’s explain what it is – it’s the work you invest into your psychological well-being and your ability to find joy in each moment of life.

 

The importance of physical fitness is all over the media, and there is a good reason for that fuss. When you keep your body healthy, you will prevent many serious health conditions and preserve your well-being for longer. However, the aspect of health that’s not getting enough attention is mental fitness. Who needs a healthy, flexible and lean body without a healthy and flexible mind?

 

Read more at http://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/practice-mental-fitness/#S9lWpp08lvPmx4VV.99


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Rescooped by Jennifer Gunawan from Nature enviroment and life.
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THE WORLD GEOGRAPHY: 12 Amazing Earth Scars

THE WORLD GEOGRAPHY: 12 Amazing Earth Scars | Aware | Scoop.it
Our planet is covered in pockmarks so deep that they can be seen from space. Some were caused by asteroid strikes, but most are the result of human meddling. Here are some of the most incredible examples of the scarred Earth.

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Ecosystem Marketplace - Perseverance Pays Off ForMassive Indonesian REDD Project

Ecosystem Marketplace - Perseverance Pays Off ForMassive Indonesian REDD Project | Aware | Scoop.it

Two years ago, Indonesia's Rimba Raya Biodiversity Reserve was on the rocks after the country’s Ministry of Forestry turned more than half of its 80,000 hectares over to palm oil interests – an act that prevented it from becoming the first carbon project to generate credits under the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) for saving endangered rainforest and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD). By the end of last year, however, the project had been saved ....
Last week, independent auditor SCS Global Services confirmed that the project had, in fact, prevented the emission of roughly 2.2 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere over the year ending in July, 2010, meaning it can now sell 2,181,352 Verified Carbon Units (VCUs) from that period. Over the course of its 30-year life, the project aims to reduce emissions by 119 million tons.


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MJP EcoArchives's curator insight, June 11, 2013 5:13 AM

It might have taken a while, and had a few wobbles along the way, but this is none the less an exciting achievement. REDD is a great theory, and a great idea to tie economic benefit to conserving nature. It's even more exciting as it's theoretical way to direct some of the economic resources of 'developed' countries to developing and under-developed countries. This theoretically makes some headway in the frustrating imbalance where many of the world's biodiversity is located in countries and regions with little finance to conserve it.

 

Of course, REDD is not a new concept, and there have been many who have criticized it - both in theory and practice. This success doesn't undo these concerns and the length of time we've had to wait to see success stories like this. And a singular example such as this one doesn't mean the whole envisioned REDD 'market' is about to thrive.

 

But once we've found an option to put some economically-driven support to nature conservation in a way that has some success, it's a sign that there is optimism to be had. We might be able to make REDD the answer we want it to be?