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Ingeborg Bachmann's Poetry in translation by Mary O'Donnell

Ingeborg Bachmann's Poetry in translation by Mary O'Donnell | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it

Ingeborg Bachmann was born in Klagenfurt, in the Austrian state of Carinthia, the daughter of a headmaster. She studied philosophy, psychology, German philology, and law at the universities of Innsbruck, Graz, and Vienna. In 1949, she received her Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Vienna with her dissertation titled “The Critical Reception of the Existential Philosophy of Martin Heidegger,” her thesis adviser was Victor Kraft. After graduating, Bachmann worked as a scriptwriter and editor at the Allied radio station Rot-Weiss-Rot, a job that enabled her to obtain an overview of contemporary literature and also supplied her with a decent income, making possible proper literary work. Furthermore, her first radio dramas were published by the station. Her literary career was enhanced by contact with Hans Weigel (littérateur and sponsor of young post-war literature) and the legendary literary circle known as Gruppe 47, whose members also included Ilse Aichinger, Paul Celan, Heinrich Böll, Marcel Reich-Ranicki and Günter Grass.

 

 

"VERILY    For Anna Achmatova   He who has never been rendered speechless, I’m telling you, whoever merely feathers his own nest and with words -   is beyond help. Not by the shortcut nor by way of ...


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Paulette Turcotte's insight:

http://poethead.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/ingeborg-bachmanns-poetry-in-translation-by-mary-odonnell/

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Arthur Rimbaud's Life, Poetry and News

Arthur Rimbaud's Life, Poetry and News | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
The life and poetry of French poet Arthur Rimbaud. His relationship with Paul Verlaine. News and art around the poet, photos galleries, documents, letters, places, lexicon, trombinoscope, forum and internal search engine.

Via Ashley Bovan
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Poems and Poetics: Outsider Poems, a Mini-Anthology in Progress (28): Harry Smith, Charles Reznikoff & the Art of Outsider Assemblage

Poems and Poetics: Outsider Poems, a Mini-Anthology in Progress (28): Harry Smith, Charles Reznikoff & the Art of Outsider Assemblage | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
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BOMB Magazine — Five Poems by Omar Pérez

BOMB Magazine — Five Poems by Omar Pérez | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
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The son of revolutionary Ernesto “Che” Guevara, poet, editor, and translator Omar Pérez was born and raised in Havana. He earned a degree in English at the University of Havana and studied Italian at the Universitá per Straniere di Siena. He has worked as a journalist for El Caimán Barbudo, and as an editor for the magazine La naranja dulce. A former member of the Cuban intellectual group Paideia, he edited the poetry magazine Mantis from 1994 to 1996.
 
Ordained as a Zen Buddhist monk, Pérez composes poems that engage languages, Zen, and political and cultural transcendence. His poetry collections include Lingua Franca (2010), Oíste hablar del gato de pelea? (1999, translated as Did You Hear about the Fighting Cat? by Kristin Dykstra, 2010), and Algo de lo Sagrado (1996, translated as Something of the Sacred by Kristin Dykstra and Robert Tejada, 2007). His translations include Italian-Cuban novelist Alba de Céspedes’s Nadie vuelve atrás(2003) and Shakespeare’s As You Like It (as Como Les Guste, 2000). 

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Female poetry in contemporary Russia | Russia & India Report

Female poetry in contemporary Russia | Russia & India Report | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
RIR has selected five varied, striking poets who reflect female poetry in Russia today

Via Mark G Kirshner
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Happy Birthday, James Joyce: Carl Jung’s Delightfully Disgruntled Review of Ulysses and His Thoughtful Letter to Joyce

Happy Birthday, James Joyce: Carl Jung’s Delightfully Disgruntled Review of Ulysses and His Thoughtful Letter to Joyce | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
"You may gather from my article what Ulysses has done to a supposedly balanced psychologist."

"Stop! I cannot think this fast! Or rather

Via Gerard Beirne
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Hugh McFadden's curator insight, February 2, 12:02 PM

A peach of a letter from Jung to Joyce

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Badr Shakir al-Sayyab: Fifty Years On - Jadaliyya

Badr Shakir al-Sayyab: Fifty Years On - Jadaliyya | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
The great Iraqi poet Badr Shakir al-Sayyab died fifty years ago today, on December 24, 1964.
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links to his poems

http://www.jadaliyya.com/pages/index/20368/badr-shakir-al-sayyab_crutch-in-hell

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Persea Books ~ Our Books ~ Life's Good, Brother

Persea Books ~ Our Books ~ Life's Good, Brother | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Persea Books, Independent publishers of fiction and nonfiction, New York
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About the Author:
Nazim Hikmet was born in Salonika in 1902 at the end of the Ottoman Empire, and died in exile in 1963, after the formation of the Turkish Republic. He was imprisoned, and his writings were banned for decades in Turkey. Now he is a national hero and recognized as one of the twentieth century’s greatest poets. Life’s Good, Brother was published posthumously in 1964, and has been translated into more than fifteen languages.

Also available from Persea by and about Nazim Hikmet:
Poems of Nazim Hikmet
Human Landscapes from My Country: An Epic Novel in Verse
Nazim Hikmet: The Life and Times of Turkey's Modern Poet

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Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar in Translation

Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar in Translation | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar, The Time Regulation Institute, translated by Maureen Freely and Alexander Dawe, introduction by Pankaj Mishra. New York: Penguin, 2014.  
The verbal text is jealous of its linguistic signature but impatient of ...
Paulette Turcotte's insight:

Traveling Tanpınar

2014 marks the appearance of a second English translation of one of the funniest satirical novels of the twentieth century. Serialized from June to September 1954 in the newspaper Yeni Istanbul (New Istanbul), Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar’s Saatleri Ayarlama Enstitüsü was published in book form in 1961. Animated as it is by a concatenation of slips of the tongue, jokes, and outright misunderstandings, Tanpınar’s novel has gone on to play yet another joke on its readers in its translated afterlife, by begetting two different English translations in less than fifteen years. Ender Gürol’s English translation, which appeared in 2001, was not very imaginative, failing to reproduce much of the range of Tanpınar’s Turkish. Despite its own shortcomings, Maureen Freely and Alexander Dawe’s able attempt at a new English translation is welcome.

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40 years after the Military Coup in Chile: Two Poems ~ (Erik Martinez Richards was part of an avant-garde poetry group called the Santiago School (together with Jorge Etcheverry, Julio Piñones and...

40 years after the Military Coup in Chile: Two Poems ~ (Erik Martinez Richards was part of an avant-garde poetry group  called the Santiago School (together with Jorge Etcheverry, Julio Piñones and... | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it

40 years after the Military Coup in Chile: Two Poems

Erik Martinez Richards 

 

The Military Coup


That overcast day in September,  
I found myself on a street near Plaza Italia
and other people were crossing in all directions
running from buses,
struggling to move faster,
people crossed the street hurriedly
and dark vehicles were coming in a perfect order
at a uniform velocity
slowly drawing a slight curve,
when I perceived how Euclidian space is but a fiction
and in my head piled up
in huge monstrous piles
Cantor’s infinite series forming successive mountain ranges
the peaks of which were unattainable.
The climbers attempted to reach the highest peak but endless series
of new hills and new peaks appeared while the ultimate peak
remained unconquered in the distance.

We saw then, knifing the sky over the city, 
a metallic eagle with a heavy and powerful flight
which rumbled over Santiago at that precise hour
we saw the metallic eagle with its polished surface
shining with blinding sparkles,
its round belly full with its heavy content
(It was happening exactly as we had been predicting for so many days,
for so many weeks maybe,
just as we had announced,
just as we had repeated tirelessly time and again).
The ground itself seemed to tremble,
in the distance we heard the thunder of some explosions.
It seemed as if the air repeated many times
in all directions of space
the wave that carried the echo of a sharp muffled howl
and I distinctly remember a ring of fire on the sky,
around the whole city,
while smoke columns rose,
over where the government palace was.

Meanwhile, in Washington, thousands of kilometres north,
a dozen men in shirtsleeves
gathered around the round figure of Henry Kissinger
who read out loud with an unmistakable accent
the coded message that had just arrived:
“The eagle flew with its prey firmly in its claws”.




The Presidential Palace in Flames  

Allende saw the flames rising.
Tear gas formed a thick fog in the hallways
and water ran down the stairs;
the blaze raged through the Carrera Room.
The glass display case 
with the founding documents of the Republic
fell suddenly to the floor, shattered.
Sitting in an armchair,
the President crouched down to address the country by radio.
Neither his voice nor his hand trembled
as he improvised his last words to the country.
A short while later someone saw him enter the Independence Room.
For an instant everything seemed silent,
only the burning wood crackled quietly.

Did he feel the floor falling under his feet?
Did he feel a wave sweeping him to the depths of the Earth?
An abyss had opened before him
(but this no one had predicted),
a great spiral that would devour him.
The night sounded deep notes close to his ear
and he felt the vertigo of falling – 
spinning – spinning, 
pulled by the enormous forces
that weighed on his arms and on his chest.
Then, in the midst of the chaos,
like a howl from another dimension, a single distinct shot was heard.
Moving through a dense cloud of smoke, Doctor Guijón turned back his steps.
The whole structure of the building creaked like a ship lashed by a hurricane.
Very far away, agitated voices echoed in the corridors.
Doctor Guijón opened the door to the room 
and saw Allende lying on the red sofa,
with no eyes, and broken skull,
his body a grotesque figure as if painted by Francis Bacon.

The cold, objective eye of the military photographs show
the brain scattered on the ceiling,
the blood and brain matter all over the walls and ceiling.

 

Erik Martinez Richards immigrated to Canada, shortly after General Augusto Pinochet's military coup against the socialist government of Salvador Allende.

Paulette Turcotte's insight:

Erik Martinez Richards was born in Santiago, Chile, and studied Spanish Literature at the University of Chile. As an undergraduate there, he was part of an avant-garde poetry group called the Santiago School (together with Jorge Etcheverry, Julio Piñones and Nain Nomez), whose works appeared in several publications, the best known of which is 33 Nombres Claves De La Poesía Chilena (Santiago: Editorial Zig-Zag, 1968). In 1974, he immigrated to Canada, shortly after General Augusto Pinochet's military coup against the socialist government of Salvador Allende. Master of Arts (Spanish Literature) from Queen's University, Kingston, Canada, with a thesis on Vicente Huidobro's Altazor. Has taught literature and translation at Queen's University, University of Western Ontario and University of Ottawa. In a collective effort with other Chilean writers in exile, founded Ediciones Cordillera in Ottawa, Canada, a publishing house that produced several books by Chilean writers between 1978-1997. Eduardo Anguita, a well known and influential Chilean author and literary critic, included him in his Nueva Antolog de poes castellana (Santiago: Editorial Universitaria, 1981); was also included in Antología de poesía chilena contemporánea (Santiago: Editorial Zig-Zag, 1984. Arteche, Scarpa, Massone Eds.). In 1985, published Tequila Sunrise (Ottawa: Ediciones Cordillera, 1985) a book of poetry. Also, his poems have appeared in other anthologies and journals from Chile, Canada, Germany and other countries. He has lectured on Latin American literature, poetry and translation (Kaddish by Allen Ginsberg) at several symposia and professional meetings in Canada and the United States. His latest book, The Sun Never Sets is published by Antares in Toronto

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Paulette Turcotte's comment, September 12, 2013 3:44 AM
these poems were previously published in London Open Mic Poetry Night blog.
Paulette Turcotte's comment, September 19, 2013 1:35 AM
you are more than welcome, Heather.
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Gneiss Press - John C. Goodman

Gneiss Press - John C. Goodman | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Gneiss Press - John C. Goodman - Gneiss Press publishes both ebooks and print books.

excerpts from John C. Goodman's Naked Beauty

 

 

excerpts from 'naked beauty'

 

Two airplanes crashing in mid-flight


Someone is searching for Claire
            looking under postage stamps
            and examining the dust in corners

when the nausea comes
            like fields of bluebells in the spring

is the way it iswaswillbe
forever and forever all men

“,,,if I had to be stabbed with a dull knife, I would want you to do it, for you have studied 
            the technique so diligently,,,”

horizons unfold
            like paper birds
their wings wet with rain

The beauty of a dead cat
            silhouetted against the effluence of spring
wet fur matted
            lips pulled back from pointed teeth
            eyes eaten away by ants
                        dark holes ringed with dried blood
the body twisted in sensuous repose
the belly distended like a pregnant girl
the forepaws spread in amorous greeting
            a welcome to eternity

            (horizons are emptinesses)

Someone is searching for Claire
            behind sofas
            under carpets
            in the backs of cupboards and the forgotten spaces between bookcases
            through cracks in lives where the love leaks out
spilling down glittering gutters
the seduction of decay

Life is swimming in the middle of the ocean
            far from any shore
            ringed by sharks, fighting the undertow
            riding the swells up and down
            head above water
                        barely
            until exhaustion overcomes
            and faintly flailing
                        sink
            
“I tasted tears at the back of my throat,” Rebecca said.

and the lumbering behemoth
            opens its jaws at last 

Someone is looking for Claire
            beneath the wheels of wrecked automobiles
            interleaved with the clauses of lapsed insurance policies
            in codas of sad songs

horizons bear the weight
            of freedom

                        and failure

disappearing over this shoulder
            or that
futures unseen dripping
            from the bells of blue flowers

dissolution claiming everything in the end
the solution to the green emergence unfolding leaves in pale spring

“If love could solve anything, it would have done so by now.”

Someone is searching for Claire
            in places she never was
            norwillbe
            foreverandforever

the precept of all that is known
circles and revolves
with the swiftness of silence
 

 

  

 

…Out! Out! Brief candle!


the sea is an abstraction
            a muddy sketch of colour and form

what are you doing here?
            “becoming a stranger to myself. –

            [blue]

a mind of cinders and ash

“travelled a long road [I] [have]
from dungeon to grave

making landfall

that’s where danger dwells:
in the transition from one element to another
in the pounding of waves on insensate rocks
the rolling of breakers on dreams and shores and beaches and histories of myths and desires and legends and tales of identities and vertebrae and longing and isolation and frustration and failure and hearts broken and darkness and death and 

            [RED]

“sought my deliverance [I?] [have?]
in the space between here and there

            (there is no space
            only spaciousness)

“meaning coated my shoulders like beads of mist **
( colour/text//colour///text////colour/////texture )
)          of    of          of       of            of             (

there’s no controlling the waves
they come as they please and go

sometimes tickly bubbly froth
sometimes heavy as moods
tossing boats like angry words


            [grreeen]
  
there’s no control
            it’s out of control!
            [i*t’s !o}}u^t o&f c999((()))ontr++==ol!
            )*&$@000##..(!)(!)(!)[!][!][!]
            
falling falling falling
the freedom of g;sallpo sprw;lthos
the many who went before
            epp fof yjr ffrrf yjr esrtr yp;f
            just the frop lurp

            (orange)

there’s no stopping it
no stopping time
it keeps coming on like a bad mood
pushing us ever further into the abstraction
            of future becoming present
            of what never was becoming our reality
            of w%oo00 @ast)))((( $Wpol…

to colour (vt): the state of being perceived
[I am colour][we are colour][they are colour]

that’s where danger lies
            in the transition of moments
            bringing the unexpected
            into the border between past and future
            the no man’s land of our existence

“Out of nothing I came, to nothing I will return.”


                        [yellow]

to nothing (vt): the state of remaining a victim of circumstance.

I am nothing [he is nothing] she is nothing [we are nothing]
      they are nothing [there is nothing] nothing is nothing


“Oh set my sail for distant shores [I] [have]
            the sea is a wide rough moment
            between coastlines of the past
            and wreckage of the future

                       [indigo]
                       [violet]

where one can be a stranger to oneself
and no one the wiser

 

 


Paulette Turcotte's insight:

available from Blue & Yellow Dog Press

 

In John C. Goodman's oscillating, never still anti-tableau of shifting visions "horizons unfold/like paper birds." Constantly observant among glints of experience and language inserted into and evolving out of the italicized "I" of these poems, it seems the transient focus of "naked beauty" exists in flux (what the poet himself calls "stream of experience") even as life proceeds on a ravishing scale "looking under postage stamps." Anywhere word glitters against word, image against image, each apt metaphor more penultimate than the last. We experience the moment and move on, dazzled, exhilerated, perpetually standing at the threshold of a glad new existence. Goodman is surpassed by none when it comes to epiphanic indulgences. He succors the pathos of the "I" of the self accusatory, the joke of the self deprecating, as though life (much like these poems) was painted in swift impasto and never forgotten.

                                                                                   - Raymond Farr, author of ECSTATIC/.of facts - Raymon Farr (Otoliths)

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John C. Goodman is a Canadian writer and Pushcart Prize nominee.

John C. Goodman is a Canadian writer and Pushcart Prize nominee. | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Paulette Turcotte's insight:

http://www.gneisspress.com/johncgoodman.htm

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Canadian Poet, John C Goodman

Canadian Poet, John C Goodman | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Canadian poetry, alternative, avant garde, abstract, surreal, non-linear, experimental, innovative.

 

John C. Goodman has published two collections of poetry, Naked Beauty (Blue & Yellow Dog Press) and The Shepherd’s Elegy (Knives, Forks and Spoons Press) as well as a novel, Talking to Wendigo (Turnstone Press), which was short-listed for an Arthur Ellis Award. He also authored the non-fiction book,Poetry: Tools & Techniques (Gneiss Press). His short fiction, poems and essays have appeared in The Fiddlehead; Otoliths; experiment-o; BlazeVOX; Istanbul Literary Review, Indefinite Space and numerous other magazines and print anthologies. John lives in the Gulf Islands, BC, Canada.

Paulette Turcotte's insight:

http://www.gneisspress.com/johncgoodman.htm

http://www.bannedpoetry.com/apps/blog/

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UNEASY RIDER by Diane Wakoski

poem by Diane Wakaski

 

Paulette Turcotte's insight:

Uneasy Rider

By Diane Wakoski b. 1937 Diane Wakoski

Falling in love with a mustacheis like sayingyou can fall in love withthe way a man polishes his shoes                which,                of course,                is one of the things that turns on                   my tuned-up engine
                those trim buckled boots
                (I feel like an advertisement                   for men’s fashions                when I think of your ankles)
Yeats was hung up with a girl’s beautiful face   
and I find myself
a bad moralist,
a failing aesthetician,
a sad poet,
wanting to touch your arms and feel the muscles   that make a man’s body have so much substance,   that makes a womanlean and yearn in that directionthat makes her melt/ she is a rainy day   in your presencethe pool of wax under a burning candle   the foam from a waterfall
You are more beautiful than any Harley-Davidson   She is the rain,waits in it for you,finds blood spotting her legsfrom the long ride. Share this text ...? Twitter Pinterest

Diane Wakoski, “Uneasy Rider” from The Motorcycle Betrayal Poems (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1971). Copyright © 1971 by Diane Wakoski.

the Poetry Foundation

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Poems and Poetics: Xi Chuan: Two Sequences from Eagle’s Words, a prose-poem in ninety-nine stanzas

Poems and Poetics: Xi Chuan: Two Sequences from Eagle’s Words, a prose-poem in ninety-nine stanzas | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
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Jacket 35 - Early 2008 - Kristin Dykstra: Gossiping Cuba: Omar Pérez and the Name of the Father

Jacket 35 - Early 2008 - Kristin Dykstra: Gossiping Cuba: Omar Pérez and the Name of the Father | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Paulette Turcotte's insight:

Kristin DykstraGossiping Cuba:Omar Pérez and the Name of the Father

 

Growing out of my translation of a 1995 poetry collection in collaboration with contemporary Cuban writer Omar Pérez López, this essay deliberately confuses boundaries — as much the boundaries between translation, poetry, and criticism, as between open secrets and outright fiction. The book in question appears in a 2007 bilingual edition, Algo de lo sagrado/Something of the Sacred. [3]

 

Translators link very different audiences, providing context for readers in the form of introductions and biographical notes, as well as making interpretive choices within the translation of the primary material. In the case of Omar Pérez, peculiar rhythms of silence and speech surround the naming of his father. These have potential ripple effects for readers of all stripes. Rather than simply disclosing the name to open this reflection, I’ll comment on those rhythms while deferring and exploding the moment of enunciation of the father’s name.

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Kiss the Cobra by Michael Annis

https://vimeo.com/74855141 A Swoon (Marc Neys) film for a text by U.S. poet Michael Annis, translated into Spanish with the help of Gabriela Perez and recited by Sitara Monica Perez, with music by ...
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Paulette Turcotte's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:50 PM

a brilliant new piece by Michael Annis! Watch for his next videopoem: "the cHa[u]nt of Human Dying, part II-iii"  a performance collaboration between Michael and Roseanna Frechette, who will be doing the French lines.  Music by Ra Sonologyst, film by Cesar Naves.

 

Alicia Winski says "Please take a few moments to watch and listen to this incredible poem, "kiss the cobra", written by Michael Annis of Howling Dog Press and read by the amazingSitara Monica Perez. This video was created by Marc Neys (also known as Swoon), and translated by Gabriela Perez and Michael Annis, with music by Sonologyst, Footage by Air Light ASMR.

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Eavan Boland reviews On Elizabeth Bishop, by Colm Tóibín - Irish Times

Eavan Boland reviews On Elizabeth Bishop, by Colm Tóibín - Irish Times | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Sometimes a radical poet has to wait for a radical critic. She has found one
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Paula Meehan:The Statue of the Virgin at Granard Speaks | RTÉ – Poem for Ireland shortlist

Paula Meehan:The Statue of the Virgin at Granard Speaks  |  RTÉ – Poem for Ireland shortlist | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
It can be bitter here at times like this, November wind sweeping across the border. Its seeds of ice would cut you to the quick.

Via Gerard Beirne
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Brought to a Boil: An Essay on Experimental Poetry — Contrary Blog

Brought to a Boil: An Essay on Experimental Poetry — Contrary Blog | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
“All poetry is experimental poetry.” ~ Wallace Stevens Turning words into art is unnatural. It begins with a contrary attitude. It says, I am unhappy with the way things are and desire to make things different. Rather than represent the […]
Paulette Turcotte's insight:

thanks to David Alm and John Olson

 

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Book Review: “Nazim Hikmet: The Life and Times of Turkey’s World Poet” - Words Without Borders

Book Review: “Nazim Hikmet: The Life and Times of Turkey’s World Poet” - Words Without Borders | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
In the soon-to-be-published biography Nazim Hikmet: The Life and Times of Turkey’s World Poet, poet Mutlu Konuk Blasing shows a thorough knowledge of both the poet’s work and its cultural context. English readers have Konuk Blasing to thank for her collaborations that have made Hikmet’s…

Courtesy of Neil Patrick Doherty

Paulette Turcotte's insight:

"Another intriguing feature of this biography is Konuk Blasing’s conjecture that there are troves of Hikmet’s poetry and letters that have yet to surface. When Hikmet was in prison, his poems were smuggled out in sealed tins of olive oil or cheese. Some of these tins found their way to friends who saved the contents by burying them in backyards until they could be published. Other writings may not have reached safekeeping. The police in Turkey confiscated some of Hikmet’s manuscripts, and the Russian government has possession of others.

The subtitle of this book calls Hikmet “Turkey’s World Poet.” This is true. He was one of the greatest writers of the last century, but his work remains relatively unknown in the U.S., which he was never able to visit because of Cold War visa policies. It is time for the English-speaking world to discover this fantastic writer, and Konuk Blasing’s new biography is a major step in this direction."



Read more: http://wordswithoutborders.org/dispatches/article/stranger-than-fiction#ixzz3Ie7ZhbrH

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10 Female Dadaists You Should Know

10 Female Dadaists You Should Know | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Today would have been the 125th birthday of feminist Dada artist Hannah Höch — dubbed “art’s original punk” by The Guardian earlier this year. As the article points out, Höch was an unlikely additi...
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Samuel Beckett's articulation of unceasing inner speech - The Guardian (blog)

Samuel Beckett's articulation of unceasing inner speech - The Guardian (blog) | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
The Guardian (blog)

Samuel Beckett's articulation of unceasing inner speech

 

From psychologist Louis Sass and philospher Gilles Deleuze, who first spoke of a "schizoid voice" in Beckett's work, to investigators on the recent Beckett and Brain Science project, critics have highlighted correspondences between the distorted perceptions of Beckett's characters and a wide gamut of psychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, this pathological framework of interpretation can be, if not reversed, at least complemented by non-pathological approaches which draw on contemporary cognitive research.

 

In fact, recent research in cognitive science and other fields has shown that hearing voices is more common than we think, including among people with no psychiatric diagnosis. The restless sound of our inner speech is a key experience of this commonality.


Via Mary Daniels Brown
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Chilean Literature in Ottawa: A Brief Overview - Dialogos

Chilean Literature in Ottawa: A Brief Overview - Dialogos | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it

excerpt ~ The group of writers who came to Ottawa in the aftermath of the 1973 coup d’état in Chile soon began to look for ways of publishing our works. I had been published in Chile, as had the poets Naín Nómez, Gonzalo Millán, and the prose writer Leandro Urbina. These writers and I, together with Ramón Sepúlveda and academic literary critic Fernando de Toro, founded Ediciones Cordillera, the first publishing house devoted chiefly to publishing the work of Chilean writers in Canada. After Cordillera closed its doors in 1996, the subsequent void was filled by Split Quotation / La cita trunca and Verbum Veritas, also based in Ottawa.

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Poethead

Poethead | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
(by Christine Murray)

If you grew up in Ireland and studied literature, you'd be forgiven for believing that Irish poets had to be colossi with beards and testicles.

I read few Irish women poet between secondary school and my studies at UCD, Belfield. These types of maps, along with posters of the great Irish writers kind of underscore the thing itself.

There's a wealth of Irish women poets available but mostly you have to search online as indices and archives are a bit like hen's teeth,

...

http://poethead.wordpress.com

 

 I wrote a note about publishing women poets here. The premise of Poethead is simple, I use technology to increase the visibility of women writers and editors’ work through devoting a small part of this blog to platforming poetry written by women writers. The Poethead site is about all types of poetry, there are many links to sites about poetry dedicated to the working writer. In my experience of being a working writer, I have found a lack in the cultural narrative. I have located this lack in how the woman poet’s voice is minimized, is not reviewed, nor is it adequately presented. I do not think that Poethead will remedy this lack. It goes a small way toward sharing the writing talents of historical and contemporary women poets.

 

s(ome great connections to Irish Women Poets here and access to the poetry of Christine Murray.)

Paulette Turcotte's insight:

another link provided by Christine Murray   http://ellipticalmovements.wordpress.com/.../irish-women.../


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