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Ingeborg Bachmann's Poetry in translation by Mary O'Donnell

Ingeborg Bachmann's Poetry in translation by Mary O'Donnell | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it

Ingeborg Bachmann was born in Klagenfurt, in the Austrian state of Carinthia, the daughter of a headmaster. She studied philosophy, psychology, German philology, and law at the universities of Innsbruck, Graz, and Vienna. In 1949, she received her Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Vienna with her dissertation titled “The Critical Reception of the Existential Philosophy of Martin Heidegger,” her thesis adviser was Victor Kraft. After graduating, Bachmann worked as a scriptwriter and editor at the Allied radio station Rot-Weiss-Rot, a job that enabled her to obtain an overview of contemporary literature and also supplied her with a decent income, making possible proper literary work. Furthermore, her first radio dramas were published by the station. Her literary career was enhanced by contact with Hans Weigel (littérateur and sponsor of young post-war literature) and the legendary literary circle known as Gruppe 47, whose members also included Ilse Aichinger, Paul Celan, Heinrich Böll, Marcel Reich-Ranicki and Günter Grass.

 

 

"VERILY    For Anna Achmatova   He who has never been rendered speechless, I’m telling you, whoever merely feathers his own nest and with words -   is beyond help. Not by the shortcut nor by way of ...


Via Gerard Beirne
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http://poethead.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/ingeborg-bachmanns-poetry-in-translation-by-mary-odonnell/

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Jacket # 11 - Linda Russo - Introduction: a context for reading Joanne Kyger

Jacket # 11 - Linda Russo - Introduction: a context for reading Joanne Kyger | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
The form "of being there" that readers of the now-called "Beat Generation" encounter differs vastly from what it was to be there. And "being there" - as a body in those spaces and amongst those signature productions textual, social and psychological - once one is there, is easy; but being able to say "what [one] wanted to say," and being heard, is another thing altogether. Joanne Kyger, unlike many women of her generation who wrote, had the rare - gift? opportunity? wherewithall? - to have been "taken up" by male writers who 'made' the places where poetry was made; literally, Joe Dunn and John Wieners, she will tell you, both young poets themselves, took her to the Sunday Meetings where Robert Duncan and Jack Spicer reigned. At a time when there were few poetry magazines (two in fact) and only one small press edited by a woman, being invited into this close-knit circle put her "under" the critical eye of those who brought poetry into print - and in this particular fact lies her difference. Because she has a large body of work published (over 20 titles) since 1965, we might see her as a prolific and substantial poet of her generation. And because her way of being was broad and sweeping, extending across several continents, into geographies and local histories, and through friendships with many poets and their differently inflected aesthetics, there is no one way to talk about her work except as that of a singular individual.
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The Beat Artist Who Rescued Paper Planes from the Streets of NYC

The Beat Artist Who Rescued Paper Planes from the Streets of NYC | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Prolific 20th-century polymath Harry Smith picked up every paper airplane he saw on the streets of Manhattan from 1961 to 1983.
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Rising poem: ‘Íota an Bháis’ for The O’Rahilly by Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill

Rising poem: ‘Íota an Bháis’ for The O’Rahilly by Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
A centenary poem as Gaeilge (translated into English underneath)

Via Gerard Beirne
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Jacket 35 - Early 2008 - Kristin Dykstra: Gossiping Cuba: Omar Pérez and the Name of the Father

Jacket 35 - Early 2008 - Kristin Dykstra: Gossiping Cuba: Omar Pérez and the Name of the Father | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Paulette Turcotte's insight:

Kristin DykstraGossiping Cuba:Omar Pérez and the Name of the Father

 

Growing out of my translation of a 1995 poetry collection in collaboration with contemporary Cuban writer Omar Pérez López, this essay deliberately confuses boundaries — as much the boundaries between translation, poetry, and criticism, as between open secrets and outright fiction. The book in question appears in a 2007 bilingual edition, Algo de lo sagrado/Something of the Sacred. [3]

 

Translators link very different audiences, providing context for readers in the form of introductions and biographical notes, as well as making interpretive choices within the translation of the primary material. In the case of Omar Pérez, peculiar rhythms of silence and speech surround the naming of his father. These have potential ripple effects for readers of all stripes. Rather than simply disclosing the name to open this reflection, I’ll comment on those rhythms while deferring and exploding the moment of enunciation of the father’s name.

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Poems and Poetics: Xi Chuan: Two Sequences from Eagle’s Words, a prose-poem in ninety-nine stanzas

Poems and Poetics: Xi Chuan: Two Sequences from Eagle’s Words, a prose-poem in ninety-nine stanzas | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
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Female poetry in contemporary Russia | Russia & India Report

Female poetry in contemporary Russia | Russia & India Report | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
RIR has selected five varied, striking poets who reflect female poetry in Russia today

Via Mark G Kirshner
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Poems and Poetics: Outsider Poems, a Mini-Anthology in Progress (28): Harry Smith, Charles Reznikoff & the Art of Outsider Assemblage

Poems and Poetics: Outsider Poems, a Mini-Anthology in Progress (28): Harry Smith, Charles Reznikoff & the Art of Outsider Assemblage | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
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Kiss the Cobra by Michael Annis

https://vimeo.com/74855141 A Swoon (Marc Neys) film for a text by U.S. poet Michael Annis, translated into Spanish with the help of Gabriela Perez and recited by Sitara Monica Perez, with music by ...
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Paulette Turcotte's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:50 PM

a brilliant new piece by Michael Annis! Watch for his next videopoem: "the cHa[u]nt of Human Dying, part II-iii"  a performance collaboration between Michael and Roseanna Frechette, who will be doing the French lines.  Music by Ra Sonologyst, film by Cesar Naves.

 

Alicia Winski says "Please take a few moments to watch and listen to this incredible poem, "kiss the cobra", written by Michael Annis of Howling Dog Press and read by the amazingSitara Monica Perez. This video was created by Marc Neys (also known as Swoon), and translated by Gabriela Perez and Michael Annis, with music by Sonologyst, Footage by Air Light ASMR.

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Happy Birthday, James Joyce: Carl Jung’s Delightfully Disgruntled Review of Ulysses and His Thoughtful Letter to Joyce

Happy Birthday, James Joyce: Carl Jung’s Delightfully Disgruntled Review of Ulysses and His Thoughtful Letter to Joyce | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
"You may gather from my article what Ulysses has done to a supposedly balanced psychologist."

"Stop! I cannot think this fast! Or rather

Via Gerard Beirne
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Hugh McFadden's curator insight, February 2, 2015 12:02 PM

A peach of a letter from Jung to Joyce

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Badr Shakir al-Sayyab: Fifty Years On - Jadaliyya

Badr Shakir al-Sayyab: Fifty Years On - Jadaliyya | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
The great Iraqi poet Badr Shakir al-Sayyab died fifty years ago today, on December 24, 1964.
Paulette Turcotte's insight:

links to his poems

http://www.jadaliyya.com/pages/index/20368/badr-shakir-al-sayyab_crutch-in-hell

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Persea Books ~ Our Books ~ Life's Good, Brother

Persea Books ~ Our Books ~ Life's Good, Brother | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Persea Books, Independent publishers of fiction and nonfiction, New York
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About the Author:
Nazim Hikmet was born in Salonika in 1902 at the end of the Ottoman Empire, and died in exile in 1963, after the formation of the Turkish Republic. He was imprisoned, and his writings were banned for decades in Turkey. Now he is a national hero and recognized as one of the twentieth century’s greatest poets. Life’s Good, Brother was published posthumously in 1964, and has been translated into more than fifteen languages.

Also available from Persea by and about Nazim Hikmet:
Poems of Nazim Hikmet
Human Landscapes from My Country: An Epic Novel in Verse
Nazim Hikmet: The Life and Times of Turkey's Modern Poet

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Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar in Translation

Ahmet Hamdi Tanpinar in Translation | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar, The Time Regulation Institute, translated by Maureen Freely and Alexander Dawe, introduction by Pankaj Mishra. New York: Penguin, 2014.  
The verbal text is jealous of its linguistic signature but impatient of ...
Paulette Turcotte's insight:

Traveling Tanpınar

2014 marks the appearance of a second English translation of one of the funniest satirical novels of the twentieth century. Serialized from June to September 1954 in the newspaper Yeni Istanbul (New Istanbul), Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar’s Saatleri Ayarlama Enstitüsü was published in book form in 1961. Animated as it is by a concatenation of slips of the tongue, jokes, and outright misunderstandings, Tanpınar’s novel has gone on to play yet another joke on its readers in its translated afterlife, by begetting two different English translations in less than fifteen years. Ender Gürol’s English translation, which appeared in 2001, was not very imaginative, failing to reproduce much of the range of Tanpınar’s Turkish. Despite its own shortcomings, Maureen Freely and Alexander Dawe’s able attempt at a new English translation is welcome.

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40 years after the Military Coup in Chile: Two Poems ~ (Erik Martinez Richards was part of an avant-garde poetry group called the Santiago School (together with Jorge Etcheverry, Julio Piñones and...

40 years after the Military Coup in Chile: Two Poems ~ (Erik Martinez Richards was part of an avant-garde poetry group  called the Santiago School (together with Jorge Etcheverry, Julio Piñones and... | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it

40 years after the Military Coup in Chile: Two Poems

Erik Martinez Richards 

 

The Military Coup


That overcast day in September,  
I found myself on a street near Plaza Italia
and other people were crossing in all directions
running from buses,
struggling to move faster,
people crossed the street hurriedly
and dark vehicles were coming in a perfect order
at a uniform velocity
slowly drawing a slight curve,
when I perceived how Euclidian space is but a fiction
and in my head piled up
in huge monstrous piles
Cantor’s infinite series forming successive mountain ranges
the peaks of which were unattainable.
The climbers attempted to reach the highest peak but endless series
of new hills and new peaks appeared while the ultimate peak
remained unconquered in the distance.

We saw then, knifing the sky over the city, 
a metallic eagle with a heavy and powerful flight
which rumbled over Santiago at that precise hour
we saw the metallic eagle with its polished surface
shining with blinding sparkles,
its round belly full with its heavy content
(It was happening exactly as we had been predicting for so many days,
for so many weeks maybe,
just as we had announced,
just as we had repeated tirelessly time and again).
The ground itself seemed to tremble,
in the distance we heard the thunder of some explosions.
It seemed as if the air repeated many times
in all directions of space
the wave that carried the echo of a sharp muffled howl
and I distinctly remember a ring of fire on the sky,
around the whole city,
while smoke columns rose,
over where the government palace was.

Meanwhile, in Washington, thousands of kilometres north,
a dozen men in shirtsleeves
gathered around the round figure of Henry Kissinger
who read out loud with an unmistakable accent
the coded message that had just arrived:
“The eagle flew with its prey firmly in its claws”.




The Presidential Palace in Flames  

Allende saw the flames rising.
Tear gas formed a thick fog in the hallways
and water ran down the stairs;
the blaze raged through the Carrera Room.
The glass display case 
with the founding documents of the Republic
fell suddenly to the floor, shattered.
Sitting in an armchair,
the President crouched down to address the country by radio.
Neither his voice nor his hand trembled
as he improvised his last words to the country.
A short while later someone saw him enter the Independence Room.
For an instant everything seemed silent,
only the burning wood crackled quietly.

Did he feel the floor falling under his feet?
Did he feel a wave sweeping him to the depths of the Earth?
An abyss had opened before him
(but this no one had predicted),
a great spiral that would devour him.
The night sounded deep notes close to his ear
and he felt the vertigo of falling – 
spinning – spinning, 
pulled by the enormous forces
that weighed on his arms and on his chest.
Then, in the midst of the chaos,
like a howl from another dimension, a single distinct shot was heard.
Moving through a dense cloud of smoke, Doctor Guijón turned back his steps.
The whole structure of the building creaked like a ship lashed by a hurricane.
Very far away, agitated voices echoed in the corridors.
Doctor Guijón opened the door to the room 
and saw Allende lying on the red sofa,
with no eyes, and broken skull,
his body a grotesque figure as if painted by Francis Bacon.

The cold, objective eye of the military photographs show
the brain scattered on the ceiling,
the blood and brain matter all over the walls and ceiling.

 

Erik Martinez Richards immigrated to Canada, shortly after General Augusto Pinochet's military coup against the socialist government of Salvador Allende.

Paulette Turcotte's insight:

Erik Martinez Richards was born in Santiago, Chile, and studied Spanish Literature at the University of Chile. As an undergraduate there, he was part of an avant-garde poetry group called the Santiago School (together with Jorge Etcheverry, Julio Piñones and Nain Nomez), whose works appeared in several publications, the best known of which is 33 Nombres Claves De La Poesía Chilena (Santiago: Editorial Zig-Zag, 1968). In 1974, he immigrated to Canada, shortly after General Augusto Pinochet's military coup against the socialist government of Salvador Allende. Master of Arts (Spanish Literature) from Queen's University, Kingston, Canada, with a thesis on Vicente Huidobro's Altazor. Has taught literature and translation at Queen's University, University of Western Ontario and University of Ottawa. In a collective effort with other Chilean writers in exile, founded Ediciones Cordillera in Ottawa, Canada, a publishing house that produced several books by Chilean writers between 1978-1997. Eduardo Anguita, a well known and influential Chilean author and literary critic, included him in his Nueva Antolog de poes castellana (Santiago: Editorial Universitaria, 1981); was also included in Antología de poesía chilena contemporánea (Santiago: Editorial Zig-Zag, 1984. Arteche, Scarpa, Massone Eds.). In 1985, published Tequila Sunrise (Ottawa: Ediciones Cordillera, 1985) a book of poetry. Also, his poems have appeared in other anthologies and journals from Chile, Canada, Germany and other countries. He has lectured on Latin American literature, poetry and translation (Kaddish by Allen Ginsberg) at several symposia and professional meetings in Canada and the United States. His latest book, The Sun Never Sets is published by Antares in Toronto

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Paulette Turcotte's comment, September 12, 2013 3:44 AM
these poems were previously published in London Open Mic Poetry Night blog.
Paulette Turcotte's comment, September 19, 2013 1:35 AM
you are more than welcome, Heather.
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Joanne Kyger: The Poet-Buddhist-Ecologist Combo You Should Know

Joanne Kyger: The Poet-Buddhist-Ecologist Combo You Should Know | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Joanne Kryger  1934-1917  
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The Women of the Beat Generation

The Women of the Beat Generation | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
By Pamela Twining The ‘Road’ mythology inspired by the Beat insurgency spoke to youth in general, and female characters like MaryLou and Romana Swartz spoke to young women, in particular, of women free-spirited and adventurous, of the excitement of being in the middle of the erotic and creative energy of the Beat scene, possibilities unknown…
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New Hall Art Collection - Women Artists In and Out of Russia in the 21st Century

New Hall Art Collection - Women Artists In and Out of Russia in the 21st Century | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it

Classic Walpurgis Night 1 - Olga Tobreluts 

 

Since the very beginning of the Modern Movement, in the early years of the 20th century, Russia has been famous for the creativity of its female  artists.  The names of Natalia Goncharova, Alexandra Exter, Liubov  Popova and Zinaida Serebriakova continue to resonate and the most famous  sculpture produced by the Soviet regime, Worker and Kolkhoz Girl, is also the work of a woman - Vera Mukhina.

 

Our upcoming exhibition will feature work by artists living in Russia  itself, in Britain, and in Western Europe.  This is in step with the  fact that Russian Modernists of all generations have tended to be  nomadic, while never losing touch with their own cultural traditions.   It throws new light on the way in which Russian art has been developing  in the post-Soviet epoch.  The exhibition is curated by Sergei Reviakin  and Edward Lucie-Smith.

 

Always in the Vanguard - Women Artists In and Out of Russia in the 21st Century

02 November 2013 – 30 November 2013

The New Hall Art Collection, Cambridge, UK


Via Caroline Claeys
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Pacific Rim Review of Books: Reviving a Place in Poetry for Lenore Kandel

Pacific Rim Review of Books:   Reviving a Place in Poetry for Lenore Kandel | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it

photo of Richard Olafson, editor and publisher, by Ann Sokoloff


Lenore Kandel lived when she did and where she did, and recorded her experience with honesty and beauty. She was definitely a product of her times, but more, Lenore Kandel has been a voice for love, for light and in her words, the “ecstatic access of enlightenment. My favorite word is YES.” She was not a self-promoter and due to her later reclusiveness, her legacy is somewhat shadowy. Perhaps this fine collection will rightfully revive her place in the world of poetry.    review by Judith Roche

Paulette Turcotte's insight:

Reviving a Place in Poetry for Lenore Kandel

review by Judith Roche

Collected Poems of Lenore Kandel               North Atlantic Press

excerpt
Poet Lenore Kandel was a literary bridge between the sensibilities of the Beats and those of the ’60s counterculture. Other observers may say “Hippie Era” but I specifically don’t because “hippie” is a media made-up epithet. If you were there – at least where I was “there” – you didn’t call yourself a “hippie.” Maybe a freak, maybe hip, certainly counterculture, but “hippie” was a media-made shorthand to denigrate the movement. Since then, in the media, it has become even more denigrating, denoting a superficial and stoned set of values bent mostly on “chilling.”

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Paulette Turcotte's curator insight, October 3, 2013 2:11 AM

Reviving a Place in Poetry for Lenore Kandel

review by Judith Roche

Collected Poems of Lenore Kandel               North Atlantic Press

excerpt
Poet Lenore Kandel was a literary bridge between the sensibilities of the Beats and those of the ’60s counterculture. Other observers may say “Hippie Era” but I specifically don’t because “hippie” is a media made-up epithet. If you were there – at least where I was “there” – you didn’t call yourself a “hippie.” Maybe a freak, maybe hip, certainly counterculture, but “hippie” was a media-made shorthand to denigrate the movement. Since then, in the media, it has become even more denigrating, denoting a superficial and stoned set of values bent mostly on “chilling.”

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Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 41, Jack Kerouac

Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 41, Jack Kerouac | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
The Paris Review is a literary magazine featuring original writing, art, and in-depth interviews with famous writers.
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Arthur Rimbaud's Life, Poetry and News

Arthur Rimbaud's Life, Poetry and News | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
The life and poetry of French poet Arthur Rimbaud. His relationship with Paul Verlaine. News and art around the poet, photos galleries, documents, letters, places, lexicon, trombinoscope, forum and internal search engine.

Via Ashley Bovan
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BOMB Magazine — Five Poems by Omar Pérez

BOMB Magazine — Five Poems by Omar Pérez | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Paulette Turcotte's insight:

The son of revolutionary Ernesto “Che” Guevara, poet, editor, and translator Omar Pérez was born and raised in Havana. He earned a degree in English at the University of Havana and studied Italian at the Universitá per Straniere di Siena. He has worked as a journalist for El Caimán Barbudo, and as an editor for the magazine La naranja dulce. A former member of the Cuban intellectual group Paideia, he edited the poetry magazine Mantis from 1994 to 1996.
 
Ordained as a Zen Buddhist monk, Pérez composes poems that engage languages, Zen, and political and cultural transcendence. His poetry collections include Lingua Franca (2010), Oíste hablar del gato de pelea? (1999, translated as Did You Hear about the Fighting Cat? by Kristin Dykstra, 2010), and Algo de lo Sagrado (1996, translated as Something of the Sacred by Kristin Dykstra and Robert Tejada, 2007). His translations include Italian-Cuban novelist Alba de Céspedes’s Nadie vuelve atrás(2003) and Shakespeare’s As You Like It (as Como Les Guste, 2000). 

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Eavan Boland reviews On Elizabeth Bishop, by Colm Tóibín - Irish Times

Eavan Boland reviews On Elizabeth Bishop, by Colm Tóibín - Irish Times | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Sometimes a radical poet has to wait for a radical critic. She has found one
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Paula Meehan:The Statue of the Virgin at Granard Speaks | RTÉ – Poem for Ireland shortlist

Paula Meehan:The Statue of the Virgin at Granard Speaks  |  RTÉ – Poem for Ireland shortlist | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
It can be bitter here at times like this, November wind sweeping across the border. Its seeds of ice would cut you to the quick.

Via Gerard Beirne
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Brought to a Boil: An Essay on Experimental Poetry — Contrary Blog

Brought to a Boil: An Essay on Experimental Poetry — Contrary Blog | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
“All poetry is experimental poetry.” ~ Wallace Stevens Turning words into art is unnatural. It begins with a contrary attitude. It says, I am unhappy with the way things are and desire to make things different. Rather than represent the […]
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thanks to David Alm and John Olson

 

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Book Review: “Nazim Hikmet: The Life and Times of Turkey’s World Poet” - Words Without Borders

Book Review: “Nazim Hikmet: The Life and Times of Turkey’s World Poet” - Words Without Borders | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
In the soon-to-be-published biography Nazim Hikmet: The Life and Times of Turkey’s World Poet, poet Mutlu Konuk Blasing shows a thorough knowledge of both the poet’s work and its cultural context. English readers have Konuk Blasing to thank for her collaborations that have made Hikmet’s…

Courtesy of Neil Patrick Doherty

Paulette Turcotte's insight:

"Another intriguing feature of this biography is Konuk Blasing’s conjecture that there are troves of Hikmet’s poetry and letters that have yet to surface. When Hikmet was in prison, his poems were smuggled out in sealed tins of olive oil or cheese. Some of these tins found their way to friends who saved the contents by burying them in backyards until they could be published. Other writings may not have reached safekeeping. The police in Turkey confiscated some of Hikmet’s manuscripts, and the Russian government has possession of others.

The subtitle of this book calls Hikmet “Turkey’s World Poet.” This is true. He was one of the greatest writers of the last century, but his work remains relatively unknown in the U.S., which he was never able to visit because of Cold War visa policies. It is time for the English-speaking world to discover this fantastic writer, and Konuk Blasing’s new biography is a major step in this direction."



Read more: http://wordswithoutborders.org/dispatches/article/stranger-than-fiction#ixzz3Ie7ZhbrH

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10 Female Dadaists You Should Know

10 Female Dadaists You Should Know | avant-garde poetry | Scoop.it
Today would have been the 125th birthday of feminist Dada artist Hannah Höch — dubbed “art’s original punk” by The Guardian earlier this year. As the article points out, Höch was an unlikely additi...
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