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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | Autres Vérités | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"

 


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:09 PM

This article pointed out that while Vietnam does not drink much coffee it has become a large exporter of the bean.  The article also talked about the ramifications of coffee farming on the economy as well as he geography of this country.  I also found it interesting that a country that no one ever trained to grow coffee has reached the heights it has with just farmers figuring out what needed to be done.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 11:05 AM

Coffee is in high demand. When any product is in high demand, countries want to rapidly be able to produce it before other countries. Vietnam has made its way to the top of the list of coffee producing/marketing countries. This has greatly affected the country in political/economic and financial ways.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 3:13 PM

This is a tough predicament, coffee growing is providing a stable income for many Vietnamese but land clearing is ruining the environment. Land mines are still in the soil in many places and could cause severe injury or loss of life. How long before the country cannot produce enough coffee and farmers start to suffer again?

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France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | Autres Vérités | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:16 PM
A war on banning American-English phrases? Obviously France didn’t get the memo about the growing global community, either that, or they are choosing to fight it tooth and nail (Whoa. Too many puns). The world today is more united then ever, whether it be economically, politically, or socially; everyone is connected somehow. We share everything; the whole world is sitting around eating sushi, wearing Northface jackets made in Bangladesh, watching their country’s version of The Voice (a show of Dutch origin), and i-chatting someone across the world. Needless to say, the world has become a very small place.
France has become known as a country that is steeped in tradition. The French are very sensitive about every part of their culture, and try very hard to preserve it. But why would they reject words that, yes, have American-English origins, but have distinct meanings across the world? I’d say that it’s just another attempt at the French to combat outside influence, and most notably, deter its society away from all things American. Let’s see how they feel the next time we change our language to include freedom fries! Ha-ha
Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 5, 2013 5:44 PM
It's not so simple ! You can't say "the French" as if everybody rejects english words. It's a national policy but in fact it's mainly a rearguard action denied everyday in the street.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:39 PM

I think that language chances as culture changes, as time passed things get more modern. For example the past summer I went back to Dominican Republic, I haven’t been there for almost eight years. Even though I kept in contact with my family over there, I was very shock to find how much the Spanish that I knew in Dominican Republic have change so much. I don’t think is possible to keep a language pure, society is not the same as 100 years ago, I bet that certain words that were correct in the English dictionary don’t even exist anymore.

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'I was 14 when I was sold'

'I was 14 when I was sold' | Autres Vérités | Scoop.it
Laxmi's story of being kidnapped and trafficked in Nepal is not an isolated case but, as this graphical account shows, things are not always what they seem.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2013 4:38 PM

Teaching about human trafficking and child slavery can be very disconcerting and uncomfortable.  How much of the details regarding these horrific situations is age-appropriate and suitable for the classroom?  The BBC is reporting on events with sensitive stories to both give a human face to the story, while protecting the identity of under-aged victims (to read about the production of this comic, read Drawing the News.)  I encourage you to use your own discretion, but I find this comicbook format an accessible, informative and tasteful way to teach about human trafficking in South Asia to minors.  It is a powerful way to teach about some hard (but important) aspects of globalization and economics. 


As geographer Shaunna Barnhart says concerning this comic, "It moves from trafficking to child labor to pressures for migration for wage labor and the resulting injustices that occur. There's differential access to education, gender inequality, land, jobs, and monetary resources that leads to inter- and intra-country trafficking of the vulnerable. In the search for improved quality of life, individuals become part of a global flow of indentured servitude which serves to exploit their vulnerabilities and exacerbate inequalities and injustice. Nepali children 'paid' in food and cell phones that play Hindi music in 'exchange' for work in textile factories - cell phones that are themselves a nexus of global resource chains and textiles which in turn enter a global market - colliding at the site of child labor which remains largely hidden and ignored by those in the Global North who may benefit from such labor."


Tags: Nepal, labor, industry, economic, poverty, globalization, India.


Ssekyewa Charles's curator insight, April 24, 2013 9:03 AM

Where is Human Rights Watch? Human trafficing is a crime to humanity!!

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France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | Autres Vérités | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:16 PM
A war on banning American-English phrases? Obviously France didn’t get the memo about the growing global community, either that, or they are choosing to fight it tooth and nail (Whoa. Too many puns). The world today is more united then ever, whether it be economically, politically, or socially; everyone is connected somehow. We share everything; the whole world is sitting around eating sushi, wearing Northface jackets made in Bangladesh, watching their country’s version of The Voice (a show of Dutch origin), and i-chatting someone across the world. Needless to say, the world has become a very small place.
France has become known as a country that is steeped in tradition. The French are very sensitive about every part of their culture, and try very hard to preserve it. But why would they reject words that, yes, have American-English origins, but have distinct meanings across the world? I’d say that it’s just another attempt at the French to combat outside influence, and most notably, deter its society away from all things American. Let’s see how they feel the next time we change our language to include freedom fries! Ha-ha
Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 5, 2013 5:44 PM
It's not so simple ! You can't say "the French" as if everybody rejects english words. It's a national policy but in fact it's mainly a rearguard action denied everyday in the street.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:39 PM

I think that language chances as culture changes, as time passed things get more modern. For example the past summer I went back to Dominican Republic, I haven’t been there for almost eight years. Even though I kept in contact with my family over there, I was very shock to find how much the Spanish that I knew in Dominican Republic have change so much. I don’t think is possible to keep a language pure, society is not the same as 100 years ago, I bet that certain words that were correct in the English dictionary don’t even exist anymore.