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*Learn Secrets They Won't Teach You at The Dealership.*

*Learn Secrets They Won't Teach You at The Dealership.* | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

 

Techniques in Automotive Sales Careers is a mobile sales training service using  I.C. Collins ebook How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry an industry first ebook to offer FREE bi-annual updates along with all our social media site updates. @ TechAutoCareers.com® is a group of automotive sales professionals driven to bringing cost-effective sales training solutions to you.

I encourage you to read our site's educational materials, explore our interactive tools and learn about TechAutoCareers.com®. Once you become a member, I urge you to join the thousands who have become users of our website. (TAC's Social Media Sites Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+ are optimized for mobile use, you can avail yourself of the latest Automotive News and the latest Sales Training Tips and Techniques all in one location that will assist you in managing your career.) This means convenience for you, and it helps us keep costs down for everyone's benefit 

"We aim to be the definitive single point of reference online resource for Automotive Sales Training " I hope you all share my passion and enthusiasm as we continue our mission, and I look forward to your comments.

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Why You Should Be Terrified of the Rising Millennial and Gen Z Workforce

Why You Should Be Terrified of the Rising Millennial and Gen Z Workforce | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Suzanne Lucas


People raised to think they're perfect don't handle failure well. Failure is a key to success. See the problem?


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


When a college student needs counseling because he's scored a B on a report card, or worse, calls the police because there's a mouse roaming the apartment, we can kind of laugh about it. I mean, how ridiculous!


Those would be just good stories, except episodes like this are becoming more and more common. Peter Gray, PhD, a research professor at Boston College who studies how children learn and value play, writes about declining resilience in college students in Psychology Today. His thoughts are frightening for the workplace. If today's college students lack resilience, what can we expect from tomorrow's job applicants? You have to hire someone.


Dr. Gray quotes from the head of counseling at Boston College, who writes:

"I have done a considerable amount of reading and research in recent months on the topic of resilience in college students. Our students are no different from what is being reported across the country on the state of late adolescence/early adulthood. There has been an increase in diagnosable mental health problems, but there has also been a decrease in the ability of many young people to manage the everyday bumps in the road of life. Whether we want it or not, these students are bringing their struggles to their teachers and others on campus who deal with students on a day-to-day basis. The lack of resilience is interfering with the academic mission of the University and is thwarting the emotional and personal development of students.(Emphasis is mine.)"


Human Resource managers and people who manage entry-level employees have already seen this. Years ago, the head of R & D HR at a pharma company I worked for, joked with me about how hard it was to give an "average" performance appraisal rating to someone with a PhD from Harvard. He was joking, but we're not laughing now. Consider the following:


If a college student needs counseling because of a bad grade, what happens when she receives negative feedback?

An employer may get a phone call from a parent, of course, but it's easy enough to say, "I can’t discuss personnel issues with you," and hang up. What about the employee who lacks resilience? Is this employee sobbing in the bathroom? Does this employee take any feedback as a sign of illegal discrimination?


You can say, of course, that it was simply well deserved negative feedback, but that doesn't mean the employee can't contact the EEOC or an employment attorney. Your case may be airtight, but it costs you money to defend it, and you may permanently damage the employee-manager relationship.


Where will you get your new ideas?

You can think of them, of course, but even Steve Jobs didn't develop Apple products all by himself. One of the problems with young adults lacking resilience is that they do not take risks. Every time you present a new idea, you run the risk of getting shot down. This process is critical to success, but if your new employees panic at the thought of possible failure, you won't get those new ideas.


How do you evaluate managers?

Good businesses need good managers, just like good universities need good professors. At the university, professors sometimes feel pressure to acquiesce to student demands because their job depends, at least in part, on student evaluation. Tough professors may be great teachers, but if delicate students can't be challenged, the professor has a choice to either wimp out or face poor student evaluations.


Is the same happening in business? A manager of exacting standards who requires quality work runs the risk of the special snowflakes running to HR and senior management at every turn.


How do you parent your children?

Are you doing your part to raise future adults, or are you focused on keeping your children happy? Do you jump at every request? Do you not trust your 7-year-old to use a knife? Do you yell at teachers who dare give a bad grade to your child? If so, you're part of the problem.


Children don't learn resilience by having mom and dad solving every problem. And if they don't learn resilience in childhood, they won't magically develop it as college students. If they don't have it as college students? They will have to learn it the workplace. So, if you don't want to impose that nightmare on future managers, at least fix it in your house.


Not every young person lacks resilience.

While colleges are seeing a rise in this behavior, it's not at 100 percent. There are great people out there if you're willing to find them. Take a look at candidates who have failed in the past. They're the ones who have faced adversity, and that's a great start on the road to success. That's what you’re looking for in an employee. And if you hire someone who exudes perfection, be careful -- that perfection could be the result of a whole herd of parents and teachers smoothing the pathway, and not the sign of a candidate who has learned to handle real challenges.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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What it takes to coach your people

What it takes to coach your people | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Center for Creative Leadership


You know you need to coach your staff. If they perform well, you perform well. And, if you aren’t currently measured on your “ability to coach and develop others” — that is likely to change soon.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


Coaching from an outside expert continues to be important, but increasingly, organizations are looking at on-the-job coaching as a vital tool for developing talent and meeting performance goals. And you, the manager, play the key role.


“The problem is that leaders are being held accountable for developing others, but few are taught effective ways to coach,” says CCL’s Candice Frankovelgia. “So, they end up giving reviews, meeting occasionally and giving advice. At CCL, we’ve been helping leader coaches understand what they need to do to be an effective coach and boiling it down to specific actions.”


Whether you are a professional coach or a leader with coaching responsibilities you need to establish the relationship; incorporate assessment, challenge and support; and push for results. To gauge your effectiveness in each of these areas, consider the following elements (adapted from CCL’s Coaching for Effectiveness program and forthcoming 360-degree assessment):


Relationships. How well do you establish boundaries and build trust? To create an effective coaching relationship, you need to, among other things:

 

* Be clear about learning and development objectives.


* Show good judgment about which information to share and which to hold private.


* Be clear about the impact of your own behavior on employees.


* Be patient.


* Show integrity.


* Follow through on promises or agreements.


* Continually show that you have employees’ best interests in mind.

Assessment. Do you skillfully help others to gain self-awareness and insight? If so, the actions you take will include the following:

 

* Provide timely feedback.


* Explore the gap between current performance and desired performance.


* Help employees discover situations where their impact is different from their intentions.


* Help gain clarity about the behaviors that employees would like to change.


* Note inconsistencies between words and actions.

 

Challenge. Do you effectively challenge the thinking and assumptions of others? Do you encourage them to practice new behaviors and step outside of their comfort zone? As a coach, you might challenge employees by:

 

* Helping them explore the unintended consequences of a potential action.


* Encouraging them to generate alternative solutions to problems.
* Asking open-ended questions.


* Helping them understand the consequences of not changing key behaviors.


* Encouraging them to take reasonable risks.

 

Support. How well do you listen? Are you able to understand the coachee’s perspective and find ways to engage him or her in the coaching and development process – even through difficulty?Support comes in many forms, including:

 

* Listening carefully to the ideas and suggestions of others.


* Being open to the perspectives of others.


* Allowing employees to vent emotions without judgment.


* Encouraging employees to make progress toward their goals.


* Recognizing the success of employees.

 

Results. Do you help the coachee set meaningful goals and be accountable for them? If so, you are likely to help employees identify:

 

* Goals that will have the greatest positive impact on their effectiveness.


* Specific behaviors that will lead to achieving their goals.


* Specific metrics and milestones that employees can use to measure progress toward their goals.

 

“Once you have the tools and some practice under your belt, you will find that coaching is an effective way to develop and motivate direct reports,” says Frankovelgia. “But you, too, will benefit. As you improve your coaching skills, you are developing leadership capabilities that have benefits in other work relationships, too. Your ability to build relationships, elicit information, challenge assumptions, support others and clarify goals will go a long way.”


How to Create a Coaching Culture


Giving individual leaders the information they need to be effective coaches is step one. But organizations that want to build a coaching culture will also want to:

 

* “Seed” the organization with coaching role models.


* Link coaching outcomes to the business.


* Coach senior leadership teams.


* Recognize and reward coaching behaviors.


* Integrate coaching with other people-management processes.

 

About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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Volvo Will Accept “Full Liability” for its Autonomous Vehicle

Volvo Will Accept “Full Liability” for its Autonomous Vehicle | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Eric Weiner


2016 Volvo XC90 price starts at $49,800


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


There remains plenty of mystery about when you’ll be able to (safely and legally) doze off or read a book while riding in a self-driving car. But perhaps the bigger question is liability: if your self-driving car is in a crash, who is on the hook for damages? Can you even be held liable for damages your car inflicted while you were recording a Vine of yourself scarfing down an Egg White Delight McMuffin?


Yet it doesn’t seem to be a big question for Volvo, as it announces that it will accept full liability for whatever happens when one of its self-driving vehicles is operating in autonomous driving mode. That includes both accidental crashes and incidents in which the autonomous software is hacked by a third party.


You might be wondering why Volvo would do such a thing. The main reason is to grease the wheels of legislation surrounding autonomous vehicle liability. According to Volvo president and CEO Håkan Samuelsson, it’s about setting a legal framework that’s clear and consistent enough for automakers to test, develop, and sell autonomous vehicles.


“The absence of one set of rules means car makers cannot conduct credible tests to develop cars that meet all the different guidelines of all 50 US states,” Samuelsson will say at an autonomous vehicle seminar tomorrow in Washington D.C. “If we are to ensure a smooth transition to autonomous mobility then together we must create the necessary framework that will support this.”


Volvo perhaps hopes that if it can sidestep miles of legal red tape by accepting full liability, others might follow suit and pave a quicker path to self-driving cars. After all, the existing tort-liability system is flexible enough to cover autonomous cars, and accident victims are extremely likely to go after automakers with deep pockets for product liability suits rather than individuals with auto insurance policies with lower limits.


This is also a likely indication of Volvo’s supreme confidence in its technologies, as well as its desire to remain a global leader in auto safety. It continues to stand by its goal to have zero deaths or injuries in new Volvos by 2025. Already by 2017, it will have started its autonomous Drive Me program, in which 100 drivers in Gothenburg will ride in autonomous Volvo XC90s over a 31-mile stretch, without any requirements to pay attention.


Clearly Volvo is making strides in the right direction, but the gears of change tend to turn slowly with issues like these. Expect lots more debate to come.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


http://www.techautocareers.com

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The Unexpected Influence of Stories Told at Work

The Unexpected Influence of Stories Told at Work | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Francesca Gino


Growing up on a Missouri farm, Walt Disney developed a love for drawing after his neighbor, a retired doctor known as “Doc” Sherwood, paid him to draw pictures of his horse.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


Disney later became a newspaper cartoonist and commercial artist, where he learned how to make commercials from cutout animations. His fascination with animation inspired him to establish his own cartoon studio and eventually become the face of the golden age of animation.


I heard this story during my onboarding process when I worked as a research consultant at Disney Imagineering a few years ago. In the weeks after I heard the story, I found my mind returning to it whenever I was feeling uninspired by the work I was doing.


Examples like this one illustrate how even simple stories can be an effective source of inspiration. In fact, they can be even more powerful than that: stories can influence our decisions and behavior. By presenting vivid examples of people who faced the challenges we face, they not only last across time but also are contagious.


That behavior is contagious is a well-known finding in psychological research, even in contexts in which we believe our actions are primarily determined by our internal motivation. Consider the case of dishonesty. Simply seeing another person cheat can lead us to cheat, even if we care about being honest. My colleagues Shahar Ayal, Dan Ariely, and I demonstrated this in a series of laboratory studies.


In one study, we asked a group of college students to solve 20 math problems in a very short time. No one could realistically solve all the problems within the allotted time. We told participants that we would pay them for whatever problems they reported they had solved. The money they could earn was placed in an envelope on their desks. After the allotted time was up, students were supposed to check their own performance, pay themselves, shred the test, and leave. The math task, however, was just a pretense for the real experiment, which concerned cheating.


Shortly after the students began working on the problems, one of them (a paid actor) announced to the room: “I’ve solved everything. What should I do?” Everyone in the room knew this was impossible and concluded that he had blatantly cheated. He also took all of the cash available to him, as if he had achieved a perfect score, and left without any consequences.


Seeing their presumed peer cheat increased the overall level of cheating in the room. We were able to conclude this by comparing the students’ self-reported performance (which, on average, was equal to about 15 math problems out of 20) to that of students in a control condition (which, on average, was seven math problems), where there was neither an actor nor a shredding machine. One of the people conducting the experiment checked students’ work before paying them. We replicated the same finding in later studies that used a fake shredding machine (so that we could determine for sure that people cheated by over-reporting their performance).


The morale of the experiment: dishonesty can be contagious when we witness one of our own engaging in unethical behavior.


Behavior can be contagious even when it’s simply described in a story. Organizational founders and executives often share their own stories and examples of past behavior in their companies. Examples abound. At McKinsey, employees are highly familiar with stories about long-time managing director Marvin Bower’s integrity, and at Starbucks, stories are widely told about CEO Howard Schultz’s commitment to employee welfare. Stories can also come from employees low on the organizational hierarchy. At Ritz-Carlton hotels, for instance, employees widely share stories about doormen, cleaning, and maintenance staff, and other employees going above and beyond for customers or for one another.


These stories are positive examples of organizational members upholding company values. Others are stories in which the protagonist violated the organization’s values. In a recent field experiment conducted by Sean Martin of Boston College, over 600 newly hired employees at a large IT firm were presented with stories of organizational members as part of their onboarding process. Some stories had a main character who occupied a high-level position in the company. Others were about a person in a low-level position. In addition, the stories varied on whether the protagonist engaged in behaviors that upheld or deviated from the organization’s values.


The result: stories about low-level organizational members engaging in values-upholding behaviors were more likely to encourage similarly positive behaviors and reduce deviant actions than those about high-level organizational members. But when the stories were about organizational members engaging in deviant behaviors, fewer value-upholding behaviors were observed if the story was about a high-level rather than a low-level member. It seems we are especially lifted up by stories of those at the bottom behaving generously and particularly discouraged by stories about higher-ups misbehaving.


Even reading works of fiction can have a marked influence on a person’s behavior. Research by Geoff Kaufman of Dartmouth College and Lisa Libby of Ohio State University found that individuals who lose themselves in the world of a character often alter their attitudes and thoughts to resemble those of the made-up person. “Experience-taking” — that is, feeling the emotions, beliefs, and internal responses of those we are reading about — can lead to real changes in the lives of readers. In one study, participants who related strongly to a character who worked hard in order to be able to vote were more likely to take part in a poll themselves.


Telling and listening to stories are traditional, even ancient, means of passing on wisdom and culture. As the research I’ve discussed suggests, stories can help organizations more effectively communicate both simple and complex knowledge about values, norms, and the solutions to difficult problems. In most organizations, there are plenty of untapped stories that could be told that would change behavior for the better.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.

 

Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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6 Ways to Make an Unforgettable First Impression

6 Ways to Make an Unforgettable First Impression | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Thomas Koulopoulos


Trust starts to take shape in the first 7 seconds of a conversation. Here are some ways to start off on the right foot.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


First impressions count; they are the gate through which you gain admission to the most important relationships you will have in your life, professionally and personally.


Human beings are like heat seeking missiles when it comes to establishing someone's character, values, and sincerity. We can't help it we're wired to connect. So while a true relationship is built on years of trust, the foundation for that trust starts in the first seven seconds of meeting someone, according to clinical psychologist and author of Straight Talk, Linda Blair. It's taken you about three times as long to read this far.


That's not much time but it's what you have. So how can you use it to make the best possible first impression and then how do you build on those first 7 seconds to make it unforgettable? It's amazingly simple and straightforward. Here are 6 proven ways to make an unforgettable first impression, whether you're doing it one-on-one, to a small group, or even an audience of thousands.


Know Who You're Talking to.

Well before those 7 seconds do your homework. That might mean a little research or simply observing a person's surroundings. When I first met Larry Elison, Oracle's Chairman and co-founder, at his home, a full-scale reproduction of a Japanese fishing village, I began by asking him if the tranquility and beauty of his home provided respite from the many demands on his time. That launched us into a conversation about everything from how he loved to play acoustic guitar on his porch, to his kids, to the modest beginnings of Oracle. Sure, I had done my homework, but that quick connection turned what was supposed to be a 30 minute meeting into a 2.5 hour genuine and authentic connection.


Eye Contact

The single most telling behavior that signals sincerity is making and maintaining eye contact. Few things are as unnerving as trying to have a conversation with someone who is periodically glancing at everything going on behind and around you. Our serotonin, oxytocin, dopamine, and endorphins (the feel good chemicals that give us a sense of well being and euphoria) all increase dramatically when we look someone in the eyes, and they look back. Do not lose eye contact during those first seven seconds. However, this is not a staring contest. Also engage through conversation or it just feels contrived and creepy. By the way if you're doing this with a large audience don't just stare out at the crowd. Combine looking at all parts of the room withe direct and regular eye contact with individuals. The combination will put you at ease and create a much more intimate setting for the audience.


Mirroring

Mirroring is the simple act of paying close attention to the person you're with and adopting the subtle nuances of their body language, the tone of their voice, even the words they use. This is not mimicry, which is a caricature of a person, but rather the ability to have empathy. Think of it as tuning into their frequency. To hear someone, and to have them hear you, you need to be sensitized to the way they express and absorb knowledge. Simple things like mirroring their body language can signal coherence. Don't discount this one, it is among the most inherently human ways we connect.


Active Listening

Being an active listener means understand the person you are talking to before you try to have yourself understood. The temptation is to define ourselves before we fully understand someone else. Try repeating what they've said to make sure you have heard it. It may feel awkward to you but you'll be amazed at how well people respond when you make the effort to understand them first.


Using The Person's Name

This is a no-brainer and yet so few people do it. When someone calls us by name there is an immediate heightened awareness of that person. Don't say his or her name in every other sentence, but use it immediately after you meet them, at least once during the conversation, and at the close of a conversation. If you have a hard time with names use the person's name in context as shortly after the start of the conversation as possible. That will reinforce your own recollection and show an immediate interest in knowing them on a personal level.


Being Grateful

Never walk away from a first encounter without doing three things; thank the person(s) by name for their time, sum up the value of the conversation, and add a personal comment that draws on a non-professional aspect of the conversation. Showing that you recognize a person for who they are means you're interested in them.


Each of these can be misconstrued as techniques to simply charm. But if that is in fact your only goal, then beware of using any of these unless you are extraordinary well versed in the art of acting and theater. Sincerity cannot easily be feigned; it either exists or it does not, and it starts in just seven seconds.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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THE BIG 3 OF LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

THE BIG 3 OF LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Nick Petrie


Warren Buffett tells a story about the first time he and Bill Gates met (in other words when the second richest man in the world met the richest).


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


They were at a party when Bill’s dad asked members of their table, “What is the one thing that has most helped you succeed?” According to Buffett, both he and Gates gave the same answer,“I know how to focus.”


Most leadership development programs aren’t focused. They are a grab bag of general topics that leaders might need (or the trainers have content on at least). That’s nice, but no longer enough. The leaders I work with for example, are so overloaded that when they get the rare time for formal development, they need it to be targeted on the ‘vital few’ areas that will address their greatest pain.


The top 3 leadership challenges as rated by 300 leaders from the C-Suite, Senior Executive and Mid-Level.


As I outlined in the last moneyball, to find out what these were we looked at 300 leaders across 3 organizational levels to uncover the areas they identified as their 3 most important leadership challenges. The results are fascinating (if you are a leadership nerd like me) and shown in the table above. I’ve listed what I think this means for leadership development below.


1) There is a Big 3 of leadership development

Not every topic matters evenly. You’ve probably heard of the 80/20 principle – 20% of inputs cause 80% of outputs. e.g 20% of your customers produce 80% of your revenue, 20% of authors sell 80% of the books. According to this data there is also an 80/20 in leadership. Roughly the same 20% of challenges are selected by 80% of the leaders. They are: Change, Collaboration and Leadership Skills (C.C.L. as it happens). If your leadership development efforts aren’t highly focused on addressing these challenges, you are probably digging for oil in the wrong area (sorry I just moved to Texas).


2) Most organizations spread their resources too thin

Many of the organizations I meet try to cover too many different leadership topics as if they all matter evenly. They don’t. Organizations have limited resources (time and money) and leaders have limited bandwidth (time and attention). Don’t let what matters most (the Big 3) be crowded out by what matters least. Check where you are putting most of your focus at the moment and adjust to focus mainly on the Big 3. Let’s face it – if you have an organization with leaders who can: lead and cope with change, collaborate to execute and use empowering leadership styles – aren’t you 80% of the way there? (I’ve personally changed my approach to focus much narrower than I had before.)


3) The Big 3 evolve at each level of the organization

While the big topics stay important as you progress up the organization, the nature of the challenge keeps changing (and therefore so do your leader’s development needs).


Change: Change is sometimes described as, ‘What the top, tells the middle, to do to the bottom’. Our leaders told us that at the top their biggest challenge was deciding on and leading the change, at the senior exec it was about executing that change and in the middle it was about coping with all those changes (from above). Change matters at all three levels but different skills sets are required at each. These days I am putting a lot more effort into helping leaders at different levels understand change and the toolkits they will need at their organizational level.


Collaboration: Everyone finds collaboration hard – and everyone needs skill development here. What is interesting is that the groups that the leaders are challenged to collaborate with evolve over time. In the middle, the collaboration challenges really are in every direction. For senior executives we saw lot’s of issues around how to ‘manage up’ and in the C-suite the issues became about how to collaborate with powerful peers – C.F.O. meet C.O.O. We all need to learn how to partner well. But we also need to know which people matter most at which stage of our career (and not many people tell you that).


Leadership Styles and Skills: While this category may seem a little catch all, when we look level by level we can be more specific. Leaders in the middle struggle most with control issues, either too much (they won’t delegate) or too little (they won’t assert). The higher up you go the more it becomes about your style and what you give off to others. As Steve Kerr, this year’s NBA winning coach of the Golden State Warriors said, “10% of being a great coach is strategy and tactics. That’s easy and we all enjoy that part. But 90% of success is the environment you create.” Do the leaders at the top of your organization know how to create a create an environment or culture? This is where many of my clients are now asking for the most help.


Four Quick Wins/ Conversation Starters


Here are four quick steps you can take to use the Big 3 in your organization.


1. Audit your current approach:

Examine your leadership development programs against the table above and ask – are we focusing our efforts on the areas that leaders say are their most important challenges?


2.Create a Curriculum that Covers the Big 3: :

Create a leadership development architecture that focuses most of your efforts on Change, Collaboration and Leadership Skills. Adjust what you focus on about the big 3 across the levels i.e. don’t teach executive presence to a mid-level leader or delegation to an upper one. Neither group will listen.


3. Find the elite methods, tools and approaches for developing the Big 3:

If these are the topic areas that make the biggest difference then you want to make sure your organization creates world class methods to develop them. Create an in-house capability to develop the Big 3 through both formal programs and through On The Job development. Look around for the methodologies, tools and thought leaders who have the best results and start adopting their approaches.


4. If you want the best, but don’t have it in-house, rent it:

If you want to boost your internal capability fast just find the very best coach, consultant, designer (or ideally all three) who can transfer this knowledge into the organization.


The lesson of the above is that in leadership development as in life, a few things matter a lot and most stuff doesn’t matter at all. The key it seems to me, is working out which is which. Because if you do you will be able create great leadership programs on topics that your leaders really care about. And like Bill Gates and Warren Buffett you will say “I succeeded because I knew how to focus.”*


*With the only difference being…….. you won’t be rich like them.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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7 Basic Grammar Mistakes That Make Customers Cringe

7 Basic Grammar Mistakes That Make Customers Cringe | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Vanessa Merit Nornberg


And may cost you the sale...


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


Spellcheck and grammar check can be a lifesaver for some people, but now that auto-correct is running the world, you may still be sending out correspondence that is riddled with errors. As Jeffrey Gitomer said, "Your grammar is a reflection of your image. Good or bad, you have made an impression. And like all impressions, you are in total control." If you make any of these grammar mistakes, you are likely giving your customers the wrong impression.


Lose vs. Loose. "I don't want to lose this deal, but if I don't cut this sales rep loose, I may." Writing loose with a double "o" (as in, I'm playing fast and loose with the rules) is a quick way to lose business. Lose, as in, to not win, is spelled with one "o".


Knowledge vs. Knowlege. "I assure you my company has the knowledge necessary to handle this contract better than any of our competitors." Knowledge spelled correctly has a "d" in it--just like confidence. Forget the "d" and your customer may feel their confidence in your company wane.


Your and You're. "I hope you're ready to give our new software a try. I think it will help you to expedite your deliveries and really make a difference in your customer satisfaction ratings." You're is the contraction for you are--not the possessive. Mix them up and it shows your customer that you're sloppy.


There, They're, and Their. There is used in conjunction with the verb to be. They're means they are. Their shows belonging or possession. Keep them straight or your customers may think they're about to spend their money with someone who is not all there.


Accept and Except. "I would love to accept this contract with your company, except the payment terms you propose will not work for us." A deal, a partnership, or anything else you want to say yes to needs to be accepted with an "a" or it means the opposite.


A lot vs alot. "I think we have a lot of options that could make this product a game changer for your business." Misspelling something with such a positive connotation is a quick way to strike a negative chord with customers. A lot is always two words when you want to indicate quantity. If you've got a lot riding on the sale, get it right.


Capital vs capitol. "If we can secure the capital for this new product line, we believe we can increase the company's sales fivefold by proposing these products to government agencies operating in the state's capitol." If it concerns money, capital has an "a" in it--just like payday.


Grammar may seem trivial, but customers judge the quality of your company by the quality of the image you put forth. Careful proofreading signals to your potential clients that you will be just as careful with their business, should they trust it to you.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.

 

Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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Should I Buy A Used Chevy Volt Electric Car?

Should I Buy A Used Chevy Volt Electric Car? | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: John Voelcker


The Chevrolet Volt range-extended electric car scores higher on owner satisfaction than any other vehicle GM has sold since it began surveying its buyers.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


It has attracted new buyers who'd never otherwise haveconsidered a Chevy.


And GM data reveals that 80 percent of all Volt trips, and two-third of all Volt miles, are covered on battery charge provided by the electric grid--despite its seemingly low electric range of 35 or 38 miles.


In other words, the Volt is the electric car that gives you almost all electric running but none of the range anxiety of running out of charge.


That's because its 1.4-liter engine switches on when the battery gets low to recharge it enough so the car continues to drive for more than 300 miles.


Gas it up, and you can do the same again.


That's a great concept; it's also extremely hard to explain, advertise, and market--and to date, GM hasn't done a very good job at any of that.


As it enters the used-car market, the Volt appears to be a high-quality and reliable option for those who want to drive electric most of the time but need the assurance that, if required, they can knock out 250 miles at a stretch.


First 2011 Chevrolet Volt delivered to retail buyer Jeffrey Kaffee, in Denville, NJ, December 2010First 2011 Chevrolet Volt delivered to retail buyer Jeffrey Kaffee, in Denville, NJ, December 2010

The first-generation Chevy Volt went on sale in December 2010, and lasted five model years.


Total production was likely around 100,000 units, when you include Volts sold in Canada and other markets--including its Opel/Vauxhall Ampera siblings (now discontinued).


An all-new 2016 Chevrolet Volt goes on sale next month in California, with 53 miles of range and a 41-mpg combined gas mileage rating when operating on engine power.


The first-generation Volt is an aerodynamic five-door, four-seat compact hatchback. Its rear seats are tight, with the T-shaped lithium-ion battery pack fitted down the tunnel and under the rear seats.


The Volt is about the size of its sibling the Chevrolet Cruze compact sedan, but the range-extended electric Volt successfully aimed at an entirely different market.


What should you know when starting to consider buying a used Chevy Volt?


PRICE


The asking price for a used Chevy Volt will vary greatly, depending on whether it's being sold privately or by a dealer. Of course age, mileage, and battery condition will play a role too.


Unlike the Nissan Leaf, however, Chevy Volts so far have shown virtually no evidence of notable battery degradation.


In general, cars bought from individuals will be lower-priced than those offered at dealerships, for whom selling used cars is generally more profitable than selling new cars.


We've heard reports and seen listings for the oldest Volts (from the 2011 and 2012 model years) now offered at prices below as $14,000, but most seem to be in the $18,000-and-up range.


Used Leafs, on the other hand, are now frequently offered for as little as $9,000--meaning the Voltdefinitely holds its value better.


You can sort through used Volt listings on The Car Connection and other sites to get a sense for what's available near you.


Remember that the new 2016 Chevrolet Volt, which goes on sale in California next month, starts at about $33,500--but that's for the base model. High-end and heavily optioned models will carry sticker prices of more than $40,000.


Finally, Chevrolet dealers offer used Volts through the brand's Certified Used vehicle program.


While prices will again be higher than those bought from individuals, such programs add a measure of reassurance for those who prefer to buy used cars that have been carefully checked over by the dealer to ensure they meet Chevrolet's strict guidelines.


BATTERY LIFE


Anyone who uses a cellphone or a laptop computer knows that batteries degrade over time.


So it's entirely logical to ask whether the same has started to happen with the liquid-cooled lithium-ion battery pack in a used Chevy Volt.


Let's be very clear: Your phone battery can be trashed in a year or two--and that is NOT the case with an electric car.


First, all electric-car batteries are warranted against total failure for either 8 years/100,000 miles or 10 years/150,000 miles, depending on what state you live in.


Second, unlike the battery in a Nissan Leaf, the Volt is designed with a liquid heating and cooling system to keep the temperatures within a specific range.


That counters the excess heat that can notably shorten the life of battery cells.The Nisan Leaf, on the other hand, uses only passive air cooling.


That design decision has already led to a handful of reports of significant Leaf battery degradation in extremely hot climates like Arizona. The Volt had no similar reports.


The price for a replacement Volt battery pack hasn't been released, as far as we know, but the need for one is likely to be so rare that potential buyers probably don't need to worry about it.


DEPRECIATION


It's now relatively public that used electric cars have significantly higher depreciation than their gasoline counterparts.


So it's reasonable to ask, "Why did they lose their value so quickly?"


It's due to at least two factors. First is unfamiliarity: With less than five years of history, buyers just don't know how a used Volt will fare when it's 10 or 12 years old.


Second, however, is a financial quirk. Buying a plug-in electric car with a battery pack of 16 kilowatt-hours or more, including the Chevrolet Volt,can qualify you for a Federal income-tax credit of $7,500.


Which Is Worst?


In other words, that Volt's first owner likely paid $7,500 less than the sticker price once he or she took the credit. That applies whether the owner was an individual or a leasing company.


Re-run the depreciation numbers using the "effective price after incentives"--California and other states have their own incentives on top of the Federal credit--and the numbers don't look nearly so bad.


And the numbers for the Chevy Volt are better than those for the Nissan Leaf after both are adjusted.


In almost any area of the country, there will be a prevailing minimum value for any used car of any age that runs decently. it's possible that the second owner will find a Volt depreciating less than the first, who incurred that higher depreciation.


MODEL-YEAR DIFFERENCES


The first thing to know about used Volts is that over the five years of production, there were three different battery-pack capacities.


The pack was released for 2011 at 16.0 kilowatt-hours, and this pack was used in 2012 Volts as well. It was enlarged to 16.5 kWh in 2013 and 2014 Volts, and then again to 17.1 kWh for a single model year, 2015.


The 2011 and 2012 Volts were rated at 35 miles of electric range, with an efficiency of 94 MPGe in electric mode. (Miles Per Gallon Equivalent measures how far an electric car can travel on the same energy as contained in 1 gallon of gasoline.)


When running on its range-extending 1.4-liter four-cylinder engine, the 2011 and 2012 Volts were rated at 37 miles per gallon combined--at that time, better than any non-hybrid vehicle on the market.


For 2013 and 2014, the range rose to 38 miles and the efficiency to 98 MPGe--though the engine's fuel efficiency stayed put. These Volts were able to draw on 10.8 kWh of the total battery energy, rather than the 10.3 kWh of 2011 and 2012 models.


For 2015, Chevrolet didn't bother to re-certify the Volt despite its larger battery, knowing that it would be replaced with an all-new 2016 design in just one model year.


That means the ratings for a used 2015 Volt remained the same as the two prior years--38 miles, 98 MPGe, and 37 mpg--though it would likely have been re-rated at a higher 41 miles of range if it had gone through the full EPA process.


That may make the 2015 model the best of the used Volts, because it will have the most electricrange.


Beyond that, each model year differed slightly.


2011 Chevrolet Volt


As launched in December 2010 at a price of $41,000, the Chevy Volt range-extended electric car came fairly well equipped.


Its center console used capacitive touch switches rather than conventional knobs and could be ordered in a high-gloss bright white color that reminded observers of the day of Apple iPods and other consumer electronics.


Only three options could be added for 2011: rear camera and park assist technology ($695), premium leather interior ($1,395); and polished alloy wheels ($595).


Several metallic paint colors added a further premium, from $495 (red) to $1000 (White Diamond or Viridian Joule).


2012 Chevrolet Volt


The 2012 Volt received a $1,000 price cut, to $39,995 including a mandatory $850 delivery fee, but it was subtly "decontented" in several ways over the better-equipped 2011 Volt.


The price of a 2012 Volt comparably equipped to a 2011 model actually rose to more than $43,000.


In 2012, two previously standard features became extra-cost options: the navigation/DVD system now cost $1,995, and the premium Bose sound system required an additional $495 fee.


GM has also cut the complimentary OnStar coverage to three years from the 2011's five-year plan; each year was priced at$299.


Proximity locking/unlocking was added for 2012 at no charge, however.


And in March 2012, GM announced it would replace every 120-Volt charging cable supplied with new Volts to date.


Many owners had reported overheating and melted cables; the replacement charging cord does not appear to suffer from those issues.


"2012.5 Volt" (California only)


Midway through the 2012 model year, a special version of the Volt was released solely for California and other states that adopted its stricter emissions laws.


That version had more emissions control equipment to qualify it as a "Transitional Partial Zero-Emission Vehicle."


In practical terms, that allowed this version of the "2012 1/2 Volt" to qualify for California's coveted "green sticker" allowing single-occupant use in carpool lanes on its notoriously crowded freeways.


2013 Chevrolet Volt


For its third model year, the Volt received an extensive package of revisions, upgrades, and equipment changes.


The most notable was a battery-pack capacity increase from 16.0 to 16.5 kilowatt-hours, boosting electric range from 35 to 38 miles and efficiency from 94 to 98 MPGe.


Visually, 2013 and later Volts can be distinguished by a liftgate and roof were painted body color, rather than the gloss black of 2011 and 2012 models.


A new interior color--Pebble Beige--was added, in both cloth upholstery and leather seats with suede inserts. A removable rear-seat center armrest was included in the Premium trim package.


Other changes included:


* A "Hold Drive" button, to let owners to conserve battery energy for later use, supplemented the previous Normal, Sport, and Mountain modes
* Three emission-level options were available: standard, the e-AT-PZEV specifiation that earns the Volt a coveted "green sticker" for single-occupancy HOV lane s in California, and a new AT-PZEV level.
* Navigation included Chevrolet MyLink, the voice and touchscreen infotainment and control system
* Safety Packages came in two levels: Package 1 includes an auto dimming inside rear-view mirror, rear park assist and the rear camera, and Package 2 adds front park assist forward collision alert and lane departure warning.
* Heated seats and steering wheel could be ordered with cloth interior, not just leather
* A removable rear-seat center armrest was included in the * Premium trim package.
* A new, extra-cost exterior color option, silver topaz, was added
* A new interior color--Pebble Beige--was added for both cloth upholstery and leather seats with suede inserts


Chevy also fitted the low-emission package from later 2012 Volts sold in California to those 2013 Volts sold in New York state, making them eligible for High-Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lane access with only a single occupant.


2014 Chevrolet Volt


The big Volt news for 2014 was a reduction of $5,000 in the base price, which was reset to $34,995. That price includes a mandatory $810 destination fee, but no optional equipment.


The only other announced changes for the 2014 model year were a leather-wrapped steering wheel and two new paint colors: Ashen Gray Metallic and Brownstowne Metallic.


2015 Chevrolet Volt


The sole notable change for the first-generation Volt's final model year was another battery capacity boost, again due to improved chemistry in the lithium-ion cells provided by LG Chem.


Few if any other changes were made, and the 2015 Volt quietly ended production in May 2015 to allow the Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly Plant to be retooled for the all-new second-generation 2016 Chevrolet Volt.


INSURANCE


While early owners of plug-in electric cars occasionally found that their insurance companies charged more than for comparable gasoline cars, insurance rates for the Volt have settled down.


In fact, they're now comparable to those for other compact hatchbacks and may even be slightly cheaper than those for gasoline-only vehicles.


As always, shop around for the best rate. But don't assume by any means that insuring a Volt will be any different from insuring any other car.


SHOULD I DO IT?


Anyone who buys a used electric car is venturing into somewhat unknown territory, just like the pioneers who bought Volts four and half years ago when they first went on sale.


Still, buying a used car always brings with it some uncertainty.


Luckily, Volts appear to be rock-solid in the area that has raised significant concerns with the Nissan Leaf: battery durability.


For a used Volt, you should check over all the usual things that you'd check on any used car: Has it been wrecked or repaired? Do all the accessories work? Which options does it have? Does it bear signs of hard use?


Used Volts are not nearly as cheap as used Leafs at the moment, and that likely reflects the market's assessment that they--or perhaps more accurately, their batteries--may prove more durable than Nissan's pioneering battery-electric hatchback.


There is one final warning, however.


As any new Volt owner will tell you, attempting to drive every last possible mile on electricity may well lead you to change your behavior.


You may now seek out charging opportunities, spend a bit of time planning your routes and your travels around electric range, and otherwise work to get that combined gas-mileage number on the screen up toward its 250-mpg maximum.


Not to mention the morning household battles over who gets to take the electric car and who is forced to use that noisy, vibrating, old-fashioned gasoline car.


Don't say we didn't warn you.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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Research: Linking “Positive Practices” to Organizational Effectiveness

Research: Linking “Positive Practices” to Organizational Effectiveness | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: DRNICOROSE


There are tons of books out there explaining how to use Positive Psychology for boosting the performance of organizations.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


But the truth is: from a scientific point of view, we really do not know very much about this link. There’s abundant research on the connection of positivity and individual performance – but it remains by and large unclear if this influence on the micro-level yields any outcomes on the macro-level. Of course, it seems to make a lot of sense to infer this relationship – but where’s the research?


A very worthwhile attempt is offered via an article named Effects of positive practices on organizational effectiveness by Kim Cameron and his colleagues. Based on prior research, they developed an inventory of what they call “positives practices”. According to the authors, these can be described as

behaviors, techniques, routines […] that represent positively deviant (i.e., unusual) practices, practices with an affirmative bias, and practices that connote virtuousness and eudemonism in organizations.


In order to do so, they administered a large number of questionnaire items to diverse groups of people. Afterwards, they clustered the answers in order to find common themes and pattern in the data. They found that all positives practices could be categorized into six distinct subgroups:


Caring

People care for, are interested in, and maintain responsibility for one another as friends.


Compassionate Support

People provide support for one another including kindness and compassion when others are struggling.


Forgiveness

People avoid blame and forgive mistakes.


Inspiration

People inspire one another at work.


Meaning

The meaningfulness of the work is emphasized, and people are elevated and renewed by the work.


Respect, Integrity, and Gratitude

People treat one another with respect and express appreciation for one another. They trust one another and maintain integrity.


Having found that structure, they gathered data from several divisions of a financial services company and one operating in the healthcare industry. They asked employees to assess their respective business unit (= the organization as a whole, not individuals) with regard to being a place that possesses the aforementioned attributes. Additionally, they obtained data on several objective and subjective key performance indicators of those business units – and finally looked at the connection of the presence of positive practices and organizational effectiveness measures. Here´s what they´ve Cameron and his colleagues found (in their own words):


* In Study 1, positive practices in financial service business units were significantly associated with financial performance, work climate, turnover, and senior executive evaluations of effectiveness. In an industry in which positive practices might be assumed to carry little importance, organizational performance was substantially affected by the implementation of positive practices.


* In Study 2, improvement in positive practices over a two year period in health care units predicted improvements in turnover, patient satisfaction, organizational climate, employee participation in the organization, quality of care, managerial support, and resource adequacy.


In the course of arguing why positive practices should have a performance-boosting effect, the authors conclude that


* cognitively, emotionally, behaviorally, physiologically, and socially, evidence suggests that human systems naturally prefer exposure to the positive, so it is expected that organizational performance would be enhanced by positive practices.


Of course, Cameron et al. urge us to be careful not to make strong inferences from their results:


The results of these two investigations, of course, are suggestive and not conclusive.


Still, their work is one of the first and still very rare pieces of research that links positive organizational behavior to organizational effectiveness. I am very much looking forward to scholars who pick up on these findings and expand our knowledge on the positivity-performance link.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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Press Release (FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE)

Press Release (FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE) | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

TechAutoCareers.com® Receives 2015 Best of Midland Award


Midland Award Program Honors the Achievement


MIDLAND October 3, 2015 -- TechAutoCareers.com® has been selected for the 2015 Best of Midland Award in the Employee Benefit Consulting Services category by the Midland Award Program.


Each year, the Midland Award Program identifies companies that we believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the Midland area a great place to live, work and play.


Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2015 Midland Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the Midland Award Program and data provided by third parties.


About Midland Award Program


The Midland Award Program is an annual awards program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Midland area. Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value.


The Midland Award Program was established to recognize the best of local businesses in our community. Our organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations and other business advertising and marketing groups. Our mission is to recognize the small business community's contributions to the U.S. economy.


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Is it time to close your F&I Department?

Is it time to close your F&I Department? | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: James De Luca


Having made a very good living as an F&I Manager and for the last 17 years F&I trainer one might find it odd that I’ve chosen to write a column about Sonic Automotive, one of the largest dealer groups in the U.S. Sonic operates in 25 states with over 100 dealerships representing 25 different brands.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


Sonic is shaking up the automotive industry with a bold strategy to eliminate their F&I departments in favour of hybrid, no negotiation, sales/F&I process where one person handles the entire transaction, with an iPad. So to my many friends and clients in F&I, this is neither a recommendation nor an endorsement, it is simply insight into a rapidly growing movement in the U.S.


Sonic-One Experience

Sonic describes this revolutionary move as a “customer-centric sales process that’s speedy and offers transparent no-negotiation low pricing”. Sonics “Experience Guides” are there to "help you, not to sell you".


It’s a risky move, but it could solve a number of fundamental problems that dealerships struggle with today.


Pay inequity between managers and sales consultants: Average salespeople earn just under $40,000.00 per year. This makes it difficult for dealers to attract great people to the position. A hybrid has much higher earning potential, which will enable dealers to attract and keep better qualified, career-minded professionals. This could make car sales a “go to” position as opposed to a “fall back” position.


A recent study found the 60% of Canadians don’t like current sales process and 80% don’t like the F&I process. Offering a faster, transparent and customer centric process could increase sales and brand loyalty if it works.


Sonic-One Experience is being piloted at 5 dealerships in Charlotte, NC. The first to implement the process was Town and Country Toyota, which began using it in October 2014.


Mystery Shop

To better understand the Sonic-One Experience, I went to Town and Country Toyota to mystery shop them. I selected a 2015 Toyota Tundra Ltd. from their website and emailed an inquiry. Within minutes I received a response from their call center offering to book me an appointment, which I did. Then I received another email giving me the specs of the truck and confirming my appointment.


I arrive to see there are no salespeople peering out the windows, waiting to pounce on me as I park. My research indicates that this is part of their process, as Sonic prefers to give shoppers time to get comfortable before someone greets them. I take a few minutes to check out the Tundra and then I went inside.


Experience Guide

A young man carrying an iPad greets me and asks if I have an appointment, I say yes. He checks his iPad and asks me if my name is Jim. I say yes and he says great, then tells me he's going to introduce me to an "Experience Guide".


A cheerful, young man wearing a golf shirt introduces himself as Zigmond, he says that he’s my “Experience Guide” and asks for a moment to check me in on his iPad. He asks me if I’ve been there before and I tell him I haven’t. Later I learn the similarities to a high end hotel check in process are no coincidence.


"We do things a differently at our dealership," Zigmond says. "Let me tell you a little about how our process works."


Zigmond takes me on a show room tour and explains the differences between his dealership a traditional one. I’m shown the "imagine bars," which are tall, slender tables with iPads attached. They’re for shoppers that want to do online research or price comparisons. Zigmond actually encourages this and sites Sonics desire to provide complete “transparency” and a “no pressure” environment. He also tells me that no one will bother me while I'm at an experience bar.


As a Mac guy, I can’t help but notice the similarities to an Apple Store. The showroom features comfortable seating areas that are more reminiscent of a hotel lobby than car dealership. There are coffee tables, with 4 comfortable leather chairs placed around them where Experience Guides talk to customers about cars, financing and F&I products. Gone are cubicles and desks where traditional and often confrontational negotiations take place.


Zigmond tells me that if I decide to buy, he'll be the only person I will deal with, from beginning to end. He says Sonics goal is to help me to buy car and complete the transaction in less than 45 minutes. He also tells me that he is on a salary and unlike his commissioned competitors he won’t apply pressure to make a sale.


Zigmond walks me to the Tundra and does a brief, but enthusiastic demonstration. He discloses the Toyota warranty and then tells me that 86% of their customers take advantage of an extended warranty. He refers to it as a “Lifestyle Product” meant to save me money and give me long-term piece of mind. He says that once I buy the Tundra he will review other lifestyle Products meant to enhance my ownership experience.


Then he asks if I’m ready for a demo drive. I say yes and he guides me along a 10-minute course that allows me to see how the truck performs in both city and highway driving.


Sonic True Price

After the demo drive, we sit at a coffee table and Zigmond tells me the Tundra retails for $45,528.00, then he tells me the Sonic True Price is $39,992.00.


Later, I find out Sonics True Price changes on the first of each month to reflect fair market value. They use proprietary software to scrape the web in conjunction with Toyota PVR, JD Powers and Polk guides to arrive at the Sonic-True price.


I tell Zigmond I’m going to finance and he offers me 3 terms and rates. I choose 48 months at .9% and he calculates a monthly payment of $925.82 on his iPad. He then emails me a worksheet.


Zigmond didn’t leave to talk to a manager and he doesn't ask me to sign anything. At no time does he apply any pressure or use clever trial closes in order to feel me out. He simply asks me if I’d like to go ahead and purchase the Tundra.


Mystery Revealed

Having worked in car dealerships for so long, I’m a little nervous about telling Zigmond that I was mystery shopping him, especially since it was month end. I tell Zigmond that I’m there doing research for my Canadian AutoWorld column and he smiles and says “No problem, this happens all the time!” and since he’s on a salary he doesn’t mind.


He says he’d like to introduce me to his manager Kendy, who turns out to be the same person the greeted me when I walked in. Kendy actually thanks me for mystery shopping them and says he’d like to meet his GM Sanjay Prakash, as he’s always interested in getting feedback from industry professionals.


Meeting the GM

Prakash, who’s Canadian arrives within minutes and introduces himself. He tells me Sonics primary goal is to “eliminate the pain points associated with buying a car”. He says “Sonic wants to make the experience easy and as transparent as possible, by offering everything to consumers when they want it as opposed to when the dealership is ready to give it.” He stresses that Sonic wants to eliminate the “linear sales process” that most dealerships use because they take too long and often times make customers uncomfortable. Prakash believes that their pricing model is only 10% of their equation and that doing the right thing for customers is key.


Sanjay also tells me that Sonic is a Fortune 500 company and they treat their employees like they work for one. Sonic offers ongoing training, benefits, job security and a clear path for advancement to their employees who choose to pursue one.


I ask about employee turn over and Prakash says “employee turnover has been virtually zero since they implemented the process.”


The Numbers

In the first quarter of 2014, before Town and Country implemented the process, they averaged 171 new car deals per month. After the implementation it rose to 231 deals per month for the same quarter in 2015.


Prakash says their market share of new Toyota sales grew from 12% to more than 21%. He attributes part of that growth to an increase in repeat and referral business from shoppers who enjoyed the Sonic-One Experience.


Prakash says CSI is also up and he believes it’s due to the two-month training program that Experience Guides go through before engaging customers. They also receive daily training from a team of former F&I and sales managers to ensure they are on top of both vehicles' features and the process.


Plus their F&I profit is up from $640.00 per car to over $900.00 with no F&I department.


The Benefits for Consumers

If the Sonic can deliver a 45-minute buying experience and offer no-negotiation pricing that’s below market average, it will please most customers. But, tough negotiators who are focused on getting the best deal regardless of the experience will probably take Sonics price and ask another dealer to beat it. Prakash say’s this is a risk they’re willing to take in order to act in the best interest of customers that prefer to have a streamlined process where negotiating isn’t necessary.


Sonic sold over 245,000 cars in 2014, so Sonics-One Experience will reach hundreds of thousand’s of buyers when it goes national. This will prompt a lot of people to question why they should tolerate the old process when presented with this new experience.


It will also prompt them to become Sonic’s best advocates as they spread the word online via reviews and social media sites.


An Excellent Process

My experience from the moment I entered the showroom until I left was excellent. Perhaps the Sonic-One Experience is the way of the future for dealers with the courage to embark on a customer centric, transparent and profit driven process.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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If ethics is not a priority, why should someone work for you?

If ethics is not a priority, why should someone work for you? | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Frank Bucaro


I have been suggesting to job seekers that one of the first things to ask a prospective employer is for their code of ethics.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


If they can’t produce one, think twice about any possible job offer. Why? Because if a company can’ tell you what their values are, how they are implemented, how ongoing the ethics training is, what else can’t they tell you?


Here’s a short series of questions to start the reflection on your company’s ethics initiative and where other ethics training opportunities may lie.


1. Do you have a code of ethics?

If not, why not? If so, do all employees have a copy of it? Does the company provide ongoing ethics training to reinforce the code? Is the format working?


2. With so many different formats for learning, how do you know which one is the most effective?

Is your ethics training a “one shot” deal or is it ongoing?
Are all employees, from the top down, required to participate in ethics training?


3. What are the options for your people to confidentially report unethical behavior, i.e. hotline, ombudsman, ethics committee?

How well are they utilized? If not, do you know why? If they are, how expedient and justly are you in dealing with the issue?


4. Do you reward ethical behavior and punish unethical behavior?


5. What type of ethics training do your new hires receive? If none, what does that say?


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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WHY # HOW TO SUCCEED IN THE AUTOMOTIVE SALES INDUSTRY BOOK MATTERS

WHY # HOW TO SUCCEED IN THE AUTOMOTIVE SALES INDUSTRY BOOK MATTERS | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

WHY # HOW TO SUCCEED IN THE AUTOMOTIVE SALES INDUSTRY BOOK MATTERS

At the heart of #TechAutoCareers.com® lies the desire to ‪‎Be #Extraordinary‬ in everything we do.


TechAutoCareers.com® goal is for each story to inspire you to reach for success and to do so with integrity.


Employees need more than a user manual, HR meetings, and weekly check-ins to grow into stand-out players. Employees need input and more resources to succeed at their jobs.


TechAutoCareers.com® is based on the lessons and best practices from more than 30 years of automotive sales industry expertise in building and implementing the best sales techniques.


Good sales habits will give you more value from your customer engagement process. When you read # HOW TO SUCCEED IN THE AUTOMOTIVE SALES INDUSTRY and act on what you have read correctly, you are implementing the best practices along with your dealerships protocol - standard techniques.


Collins is imperfect and courageous. He's a flawed, growing leader who is intent on self - improvement and determined to succeed. Throughout TAC's journey, Collins and his creative team remind us that learning is a life - long process best experienced through trial and error, and interactive technology.


Always follow-up personally with every single person who submits a CSI survey. At the very least, thank them for their score and any feedback they have provided so they know you are not a robot. But ideally use it as an opportunity to learn more and show you're listening. Ask more questions. Build relationships THAT IS THE KEY. Let's say if they give you a score of 100%, ask them specific examples of ways they could promote you to others. If they give you a score of anything less, ask them why and what problem they may have had that isn't being resolved or how you might earn that recommendation in the future.


Technology-based e-book programs are incredibly efficient. Not only do companies save time and money by eliminating the time and cost of on-site instruction, e-book training solutions have also been proven to be much more successful at improving participation and retention of material. Learn: Secrets They Won't Teach You at The Dealership.


According to the most recent J.D. Power 2015 US Sales Satisfaction Index Survey, the use of technology tablets and computer displays by sales consultants during the sales process can substantially improve efficiency, resulting in increased customer satisfaction among new vehicle buyers.


Consumer satisfaction soars when sales options are presented on a computer or tablet screen, compared to other methods, including printed materials, verbal quotes, and handwritten figures.


The benefits of e-books are obvious. That’s why 77% of American companies rely on online eLearning programs. Now that e-books is established as a best practice, the focus throughout 2016 will be on improving available eLearning methodology to maximize its effectiveness and convenience for employers and employees.


The nice thing about sales is technology may change but the basic rules still apply


Get in the habit of putting all your customers into your personal computer with results so that you can segment and categorize them. That's how you can learn the top reasons people love or hate your salesmanship or service. You can prioritize creating a feature to address your weak areas and then over time watch how feedback for that segment improves.


HOW TO SUCCEED IN THE AUTOMOTIVE SALES INDUSTRY is a e-book about the SALES INDUSTRY. Or it can just be a BOOK that is read and forgotten about. It is your choice. The customers from -TechAutoCareers.com® (where I work) that have fully integrated all of our suggestions have found it makes a significant and measurable difference to their bottom line. That's why we have worked so hard to make implementing these suggestions as easy as possible into our product.


Think Like Your Customers: Listening to Learn Your Customers' Needs An Desires


Train, train, train, and train some more so everything you do is like a habit always stay motivated if not find someone who is and get around them so it rubs on you. How much more would a dealership make if every employee knew exactly what to do - and actually did it? Sales success is about increasing the pool of high performers by deploying a consistent process.


This book is not presented as research. It is rather a saga of the passion that was found in the best companies. You get to experience 24 hours in the life of a sales consultant from the initial meet and greet all the way through the delivery and beyond. But what really sets us apart is you can come back over and over and experience--a place to hang out, work, and connect with like minded individuals on our social sites.


“We do this because TechAutoCareers.com® is a place where members can become productive, successful professionals – not just when you’re trying to find a job, or search for another person.”


Growing an extraordinary network.


The key word here is "growing". A lot of people have a "what can I get" out of this network attitude, as opposed to "what can I contribute" attitude. Growing a network means investing time and energy into, supporting those in your network, looking for ways to help others and protecting them. Growing a great network and we will have a ready-made fan club that will protect you and your reputation at every opportunity.


Click here to join our team.


Contact me here with your questions.

e-mail@ editor-in-chief@TechAutoCareers.com®


When you get your copy of # HOW TO SUCCEED IN THE AUTOMOTIVE SALES INDUSTRY you also get me, as your personal coach.


I. C. Collins

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Why Company Culture Matters More to Employee Than Pay

Why Company Culture Matters More to Employee Than Pay | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Richard Pearson


Motivating people to work can be a difficult task, especially when different things motivate everyone.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


It used to be the case that money was the main thing offered by employers to help increase productivity; but there is mounting evidence, especially with Generation Y stepping into the working limelight, that money is no longer the motivator it once was.


Working culture is becoming a predominant influencing factor in the ability to hire and retain new talent. But in order to create a winning culture you need to take the psychology of people, as individuals and as a team, into consideration.


It is a time-honored tradition that we reward good behavior and penalize the bad, an approach that is known as operant conditioning and proposed by Skinner in 1938. This method of reinforcement encourages people (or in Skinner’s case; rats) to connect an action with an outcome; good behaviour receives a reward, bad behaviour a punishment. We are all familiar with this method, but is it really the best way to encourage productivity at work?


While it’s nice to be rewarded for the work that you do, when used incorrectly it can be perceived as trying to buy someone’s skills, and that can make a person feel unvalued and that their skills are disposable.


This is where Maslow (1943) comes in. He started to explain why simple reward and punishment might not be enough to get the best out of people. His hierarchy of needs demonstrates the fact that every person has a set of needs, which are ranked in a scale based on how necessary they are.


Everyone starts with the basic needs of survival: warmth, food and health. These needs can usually be secured through having enough money. Because of this, managers are realizing that money isn’t the only answer to motivational problems.


To help employees achieve higher levels on the hierarchy of needs, it is important to provide people with a safe place to work, while also giving them the knowledge that their job is secure.


Next, nurturing a welcoming and accepting working culture will start to secure the needs of friendship, self-esteem, confidence and achievement. All of this helps employees to feel appreciated, valued and like the work they are doing is making a difference. If people feel fulfilled and respected in what they do they are more likely to remain motivated and loyal to the company for which they work.


Most people, especially the new working generation, are looking to reach the ‘self-actualization’ stage where they can feel truly valued as individuals. It therefore stands to reason that companies need to be paying attention to how they are supporting their staff.


Companies who don’t value what their employees bring to the table, besides the revenue that they turn over, find that their attraction and retention rates are much lower than companies that do. In fact, according to Leigh Branham, 89% of managers think that their employees leave for higher salaries when 80-90% of employees actually leave for reasons other than money. Tweet this!


Realizing that fostering a strong relationship with your staff can result in measurable benefits for your company. A study by Madison found that companies who had highly engaged staff through an excellent office culture, took fewer days for illness (2.69 as opposed to 6.19), and would recommend their company more to others (67% against 3% for disengaged employees). These figures strongly support the fact that valuing your staff can have a significant impact on your bottom line.


It’s not hard to create this kind of culture and replicate the success of the leading employee engagement companies (think Google and Twitter). Making small changes to several areas of your working culture is an effective way to change how your company works as a whole. This is described in the marginal gains theory, something that sports teams have long practiced.


By analyzing and improving upon all the parts that make up your company, you can see measurable changes in how your company works and is perceived by your employees. This will help to ensure happiness, higher motivation levels and loyalty amongst your staff.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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What Does Your Handwriting Say About Your Personality?

By: Siobhan Harmer


According to graphologists, our handwriting styles can reveal intricate clues about our personalities.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


Whether you have large or small handwriting, if you use wide spaces or prefer a narrower format, even how you choose to dot your i’s: these can apparently show whether you are outgoing, empathetic, adaptive or too self-critical.


Write a sentence down and then watch this video to see what your handwriting says about you:


https://youtu.be/eurGvShP0T8


According to these predictions, my handwriting suggests I am:

Well-adjusted
Adaptive
Confident
Comfortable in my own skin
Private
Introvert
Detail-Orientated
Organized
Empathetic


Err. Some of these ring truer than others, for example I agree I am adaptive and private, but I would not say I’m particularly well organised. What did your handwriting say about you?


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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Toyota tech keeps driver in seat with hands off wheel

Toyota tech keeps driver in seat with hands off wheel | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Hans Greimel


A Lexus GS with Toyota's Mobility Teammate technology merges into highway traffic, above. The driver programs the destination, takes the car to the highway, then flicks a button and sits back.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


TOKYO -- With the click of a button, our Toyota test driver lets go of the steering wheel and sits back as the white Lexus GS merges onto the crowded Bayshore Route of Tokyo's Shuto Expressway, weaving between cars and changing lanes in an impressive display of autonomous driving.


Toyota's name for the technology -- Mobility Teammate, with the emphasis on team -- offers a telling insight into how the automaker aims to differentiate itself from rivals in the coming age of self-driving cars.


No hyperbole about driverless convenience, the triumph of super-computer intelligence or the frailty of human judgment. Toyota's vision of the future keeps customers in the driver's seat even if their hands aren't always on the wheel.


"Interactions between drivers and cars should mirror those between close friends who share a common purpose, sometimes watching over each other and sometimes helping each other," Toyota says of its Mobility Teammate system. "This approach acknowledges the utility of automated driving technologies while maintaining the fun experience of driving itself."


Indeed, its Mobility Teammate logo depicts the silhouette of a human and a robot, each with one hand on a steering wheel.


'Fun to drive, again'

The impulse to keep humans in the equation comes straight from the top. Car-guy CEO Akio Toyoda is an accomplished race driver who has dedicated his tenure to spicing up the brand's cars. He is Toyota's No. 1 believer in making cars fun to drive. In fact, Toyota's tag line in Japan is: "Fun to drive, again."


Hence the quandary over autonomous cars: How can they be fun to drive (again) if you just sit there while a computer takes over?


Toyota walks that fine line with its teammate concept.


"The concept has not changed, but our way of explanation has changed," said Ken Koibuchi, general manager in charge of Toyota's autonomous driving program. "How much would be done by automated driving became unclear. So we tried to describe two things in one word. People and the vehicle are teammates."


In practice, though, Toyota's prototype system leaves little for the driver to do, testament to how far the technology has come.


The driver programs the destination into the navigation system and pilots the car, as normal, to the highway on-ramp.


As the car passes through the automatic tollbooth, the autonomous drive function switches into "ready" mode. That's when our driver flicked the button and released his grip.

The car immediately slumped in speed, then suddenly rebounded with a surge of acceleration and charged into traffic, automatically initiating the blinker and merging.


After about five miles, as we were approaching the off-ramp, the car automatically changed lanes again, timing its move to weave between other vehicles in Tokyo's evening rush hour.


Hurdles, hopes

Toyota hopes to deploy the technology around 2020, even though trials on public roads began only in March. Toyota has eight Highway Teammate-modified Lexus GS sedans. Koibuchi's autonomous driving division has 60 engineers in Japan, 20 in North America and 10 in Europe.


Plenty of hurdles, including cost and complexity, remain.


The system uses six lidar sensors, one enormous stereo camera behind the rearview mirror and two millimeter wave radar sensors, one each in front and back.


GPS is a must-have, but the system's biggest limitation is its reliance on ultra-precise mapping. Existing maps simply won't cut it. Toyota's system needs maps so detailed that they reproduce the very size and shape of every lane on the road.


In fact, Toyota had to work with an outside mapping company to develop its own maps for this small stretch of Tokyo highway. Without it, the car wouldn't be able to self-drive there.


Regardless of when Toyota begins to mainstream the technology, one aspect of its marketing is taking shape: Mobility Teammate shouldn't replace the driver; it should make driving more enjoyable.


"The system watches over me. That's more fun," Koibuchi said. "The machine doesn't switch the button to take over from the driver; the driver switches it to hand off to the vehicle."


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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The Most Important Skill Of Every Great Leader

The Most Important Skill Of Every Great Leader | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Thomas Koulopoulos


Great leaders ask these three questions when making any decision.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


Great decision-making is one of the hallmarks of great leadership. But how do you develop great decision-making skills? Are some people just born with the ability to make good decisions by using innately logical minds and good intuition?


Goooooooal!

So, here's a great piece of trivia that puts the pitfalls of decision-making into perspective. Soccer goalkeepers trying to block a penalty kick can't wait until the ball is kicked to figure out how to block it; he or she will simply not have enough time to respond. The keeper has to make a decision on what part of the net to protect before the ball is kicked. You'd think that in this sort of set up the odds are 50/50; but they are not. Over 80% of penalty kicks score according to research at Ben-Guriono University in Israel. They reason for this is very counter intuitive but it tells us a lot about how decisions are made, especially in fast moving situations.


"...the bias towards action rather than inaction was more compelling than the actual results!"


According to the Ben-Guriono research, it turns out that the best way to stop a penalty kick is to just stay in the center of the net. But that's rarely what keepers do. When asked why they instead pick a side to jump to, in order to block the kick, keepers said that they felt much worse about goals that scored when they stayed in the center and didn't take action than those that scored when they did take action, by jumping to one side or the other. In other words the bias towards action rather than inaction was more compelling than the actual results!


The same thing happens in most organizations; we take action even when the action is unnecessary.


The Holy Trinity of Decision Making

The reality is that good decision-making is a simple matter of sticking to some very basic guidelines, while everyone else wants to take a shortcut and just take action--any action.


In my experience, the vast majority of decisions are actually non-decisions; they appear in the guise of a problem that has to be solved when the apparent problem actually has nothing to do the root cause of the issue at hand. For example, deciding how to streamline a process that shouldn't even exist to begin with. It's like spending time and money to tune your car's engine so that it gets an extra five miles to the gallon when you only use it to drive two miles a day.


"Your role, as a leader, is to make sure that you and your organization don't get sucked into the black h*** of decision-making just because it feels like progress."


This sort of decision overload leads to too much time in meetings, misallocation of resources, investment in outdated systems and processes, and ultimately a dysfunctional culture that feeds off of the need to overanalyze everything, no matter how insignificant. The reason for this poor organizational pathology is that people like to take action because it makes them feel as though they are creating value.


Your role, as a leader, is to make sure that you and your organization don't get sucked into the black h*** of decision-making just because it feels like progress.


The good news is that you can develop great decision-making skills just by asking three simple questions whenever you find yourself in a situation where a decision has to be made.


Question #1


Why are we making this decision?

The first and most important question to ask when making any decision is "Why are we doing this?" To use the keeper analogy, do we really have to move to block the shot? That sounds so incredibly simplistic that it is the easiest step to avoid. That's also why it's the hardest question to ask; everyone assumes the "why" is obvious, making it frustrating to even consider answering Why. Yet, this is one of the core techniques of the Six Sigma methodology, which suggests asking "why: at least five times in order to identify the root cause of an issue. Many decisions are masked in layers of complexity that need to pealed away in order to address the actual problem or opportunity.


Yet, our instinct is to take action and solve the problem at hand. In these cases, like the goalkeeper, we are moving back and forth from side to side to create an illusion of action that makes us feel productive when it actually does nothing for the organization's effectiveness and bottom line. Learning to ask Why so that you can simply move beyond these time sinks may be one of the most critical skills you can develop and impart to your colleagues.


Question #2


When do we need to make this decision by?

The second temptation is always to go from Why to How. The problem is that How is almost always dependent on When. One of my favorite examples is the scene in Apollo 13 when the brilliant engineers at NASA have to figure out how to build a makeshift CO2 scrubber using duct tape, users manuals, and whatever else was available onboard the ill-fated orbiter and lunar lander. Given unlimited time they could easily have built many versions, tested each one, and refined the design to work perfectly. But they had minutes not hours to decide. Even in that scenario you can imagine at least one engineer saying, "But if we could just get a few more minutes this would be perfect! Can someone just ask the astronauts to hold their breath?"


Whether you like it or not, the time you have to decide will determine the degree to which you can be creative about gathering and analyzing the variables involved in the decision. Often, just standing your ground is the best action to take, even thought it may feel like you're not in motion.


Question #3


How do we make the decision?

By the time you finally get to this question you know that the decision has both merit and a time constraint. The issue now is how to go about making the best decision possible. Great leaders make sure their team knows what the parameters of the decision are and keeps the team within those boundaries, while reassuring them that time and resources will rarely be adequate to anticipate all the repercussion of most decisions. The key isn't predicting the future, but surviving it.


The Prescription

Do yourself a favor and try these three steps for the next two weeks. While I can't guarantee the outcomes of your decision, I can assure you that not only will your ability to make decisions improve significantly, but you'll also become a much more effective leader in the process.


Game on!


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


http://www.techautocareers.com

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The Employee’s Role in Cybersecurity: Know, Then Do

The Employee’s Role in Cybersecurity: Know, Then Do | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Tom Vincent, II


Many descriptions of cybersecurity programs and tools conjure images of fortresses and other constructs - “firewalls,” anyone? - that are designed to provide protection against the marauding hordes, silent ninjas, or smooth agents of the community of hackers attempting to gain access to the precious data locked within.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


As comforting as such images may be, employee access to information and communications can reduce those barricades and battlements to a series of individual entrances to a company’s data. While the familiar axiom of “train your employees” is still relevant - it is becoming insufficient; beyond simply knowing what to do, more and more employees must affirmatively act to pursue their company’s cybersecurity goals.


What to Know:

To best protect the company’s interests, employees should at a minimum be aware of the various requirements for cybersecurity that impact every employee within an organization, which can be categorized into three primary “buckets” of rules. These will form the framework through which an employee can assess the appropriateness of their actions regarding cybersecurity:


1. The general laws, regulations, and requirements the company is subject to.

 

Depending upon the company, this can include federal financial and health information privacy laws, state data breach laws, and particular contractual commitments. While not every employee may need to know every individual requirement, some overall knowledge of the breadth of the requirements can provide the appropriate perspective - and caution - beneficial to all employees.


2. Specific policies and procedures adopted by the company with respect to cybersecurity.

 

The company’s overall cybersecurity policy should set the general direction and overall tone for the company’s priorities and the individual actions of its employees. More targeted departmental policies can bring the company’s goals into focus for the particular responsibilities of employees within those departments. Properly-developed procedures provide employees with guidance to fulfill both company policies and their specific responsibilities towards cybersecurity.


3. Expectations of particular employee responsibility and behavior regarding cybersecurity.

 

An employee’s starting point to understand what her access to information (and corresponding responsibilities) is often her job description - defining levels of access not only addresses new “need to know” baselines, but may also provide employees with the appropriate perspective on access. This should also be carried through into policies, procedures and practices regarding “ad hoc” access, such as meeting attendance and inclusion on e-mails with sensitive or protected information.


What to Do:

 

Having provided the employee with cybersecurity expectations from both governing authorities and the company itself, the company’s next responsibility is to motivate the employee to act accordingly. With appropriate mechanisms and incentives, an employee is more likely to put this knowledge to best use within the company and act to support the company’s cybersecurity efforts. As discussed above, knowledge of what to do for cybersecurity is not enough - the employee must understand that she has the power to impact cybersecurity at the company and the right and responsibility to do so. To create that understanding, certain specific ways employees may address cybersecurity within the company should be identified:


1. Particular responsibilities for the employee within the company to raise cybersecurity issues.

 

Beyond the employee’s individual capabilities in his or her position, an appropriate reporting structure can provide an additional sense of ability and responsibility to the employee. If the employee’s supervisor is perceived by the employee to have appropriate authority, the employee may feel that issues raised to that supervisor will be appropriately addressed.


2. Specific risks for the company in general, and for the employee in particular - and how the employee may mitigate them.

 

This sort of information should be provided before the employee is given access to the company’s systems. Many of these risks involve e-mail, and risk mitigation efforts are often easy to communicate such as verifying the address of e-mail received and appropriately handling (or forwarding to information security) e-mails from unfamiliar addresses; refraining from opening attachments from or links within unfamiliar e-mails; refraining from communicating protected information, either via e-mail or by phone; and providing both appropriate information security and physical security for remote devices.


It is especially important to include cybersecurity discussions in any group or committee responsible for new product...


3. The role of cybersecurity in the future of the company.

 

Discussion of cybersecurity issues in officers’ and staff meetings, and in particular specific security measures or efforts, further reinforces the significance of the issues with employees. Including such issues in business-line or issue-specific committees can also help to communicate the impact of cybersecurity in various elements of the company’s business. It is especially important to include cybersecurity discussions in any group or committee responsible for new product.


4. The consequences of his or her action - or inaction.

 

Ultimately, the strongest motivator for an employee will be the understanding of how her actions, or failures to act, will impact not just the company but her own future within it. At the company-wide level, the employee should understand that cybersecurity efforts are subject to the “trust but verify” standard - while the company may inform its employees as to cybersecurity efforts, and also empower them to take action, it also follows up to verify that appropriate action is taken by its employees. At the employee level, identifying expected fulfilment of that responsibility - through goals established during performance reviews - provides an employee with guidance as to the importance of her particular and individual actions with respect to the cybersecurity.


At the company-wide level, the employee should understand that cybersecurity efforts are subject to the “trust but verify” standard...


Despite the various organizational and technical safeguards that may be put into place, individual employee behavior can work to either undermine those efforts or fill in the gaps that top-down measures can’t always see. Thousands of decisions are made every day to protect a company’s information security structure - or open it to intrusion - every time an employee reviews an e-mail message or uses the internet. Through providing appropriate knowledge - and ways to use that knowledge - companies can take steps to better arm those guards that protect all of the doors into their cybersecurity fortresses.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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Tesla Model X: The New Safest SUV?

Tesla Model X: The New Safest SUV? | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Bengt Halvorson


The Tesla Motors [NSDQ: TSLA] Model X SUV has been revealed in production form; and while the packaging and performance of this new electric SUV are mostly as expected, there were plenty of surprises.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


One of the surprises was how well the trick double-hinged falcon doors are designed—with a very narrow spread as they open, plus sensors that adjust the arc of the doors to available height. Another was that the Model X can tow 5,000 pounds, while carrying seven people and luggage.


But the one that CEO Elon Musk spent nearly the first half of the Model X presentation outlining was safety. The Model X, he said, is the first SUV that’s five-star in every category.


Musk summed that in the federal tests, those stars correlate directly to the probability of injury in a particular set of conditions.


For frontal crashes, the lack of an engine block allows engineers to have a longer distance for the crumple zone.


The Model X also achieves perfect five-star results, he said; and its side pole test also has about half the intrusion of the next closest SUV model.


Also because of the low-set battery pack and resulting extremely low center of mass, it has half the rollover propensity of any SUV or minivan.


The Model X certainly isn't alone in its top-tier ratings. The Tesla Model S sedan already earns a top five-star federal safety score—both overall, and in the frontal, side, and side pole tests, as well as in rollover, of course.


Environmental safety as well as occupant safety


But safety does take other forms, and Musk then couldn’t resist a little jab to other current events.


“Recent events have illustrated the importance of air safety,” he said, clearly alluding to Volkswagen’s “clean diesel” emissions-cheating scandal, then introducing a true HEPA air filtration system for the Model X, including three layers of activated carbon.

Tesla Model X The New Safest SUV2

Tesla Model X Introduction - Fremont, CA, September 2015Tesla


“If there’s ever an...apocalyptic scenario, of some kind, hypothetically, you just press the bioweapon defense mode button...this is a real button,” Musk said, as air-pollution-related reductions in life expectancy for some major world cities were shown on screen.


It's an unexpected selling point for the Model X; but based on last night's presentation, there are plenty of others.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service

 

http://www.techautocareers.com

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Stop Talking About This One Thing If You Want Your Sales Reps To Succeed

Stop Talking About This One Thing If You Want Your Sales Reps To Succeed | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Barrett Riddleberger


Change the conversation with your sales reps and change their results for the better.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


When a sales rep isn't making quota, the issue of quota becomes the topic of conversation. Why aren't you making your quota? You know you're supposed to make your quota? What's the problem? You're going to need to do better, work harder and work smarter. Now get out there and make it happen!


This is not Sales Management; it's badgering... and highly unproductive.


Your sales rep already knows what their quota is and where they are against their quota. There's no positive outcome by bringing it up again and again. It only breeds frustration and resentment. Talking about sales quota should be a 10-second conversation, whether they are at 110% or 60% of quota.


Instead of endlessly badgering your sales rep, ask yourself this question:


Why is my sales rep not making quota?


Now, really think through your answer.


The most common answer (whether you answer it or your sales rep does) is usually quite vague: "Not enough activity" comes the response. The problem with this answer is: neither you nor your sales rep learns anything new about the source of the problem. So, the real question is: what exactly does the term "activity" mean?


The key to answering this question and moving towards a more productive discussion is being specific about the concept of "activity".


When I consult with sales leaders, I guide them to finding out why their sales rep is not meeting quota by focusing their coaching conversations on activity, not quota, using these four (4) guidelines:


1. Type of activity--Which sales activity is your sales rep engaging in that might be the problem? Which step of the sales process does this activity fit into? Is it a complex activity or a simple one? Does this activity require other personnel or resources to successfully implement? For example, does your sales rep need a technical expert when doing a needs analysis with a tech from the prospects company?


2. Priority of activity--Are there other activities that are more important than this one? How would you rank the importance of this sales activity compared to others? Should your sales rep refocus their attention to more impactful or profitable activities? For example, they might need to prioritize qualifying buyers over acquiring additional product knowledge.


3. Amount of activity--How much of a particular activity is your sales rep doing? Are they spending too much time on it? Not enough? Just right? An example might be prospecting. Too many salespeople simply don't invest enough time in this step of the sales process limiting their sales results.


4. Quality of activity--How well is your sales rep executing a specific activity? This is the most subjective, but the most informative. If your sales rep is engaged in the right activity with the right amount of time, yet still failing to make their quota, then they may not be doing this sales activity very well. For example, they may be making 50 cold calls each week (right activity, right quantity), but their words, delivery and confidence is poor resulting in minimal first appointments, adversely affecting sales quota achievement.


Your coaching session should not be about quota. It should be about your sales reps activity based on the criteria listed above. Why? Because activity drives results. Therefore, be sure that your sales reps are engaged in the right activity, for the right amount of time and executing at a high level. When you find a gap, then you'll know where they need coaching.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


http://www.techautocareers.com

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Rethinking the Showroom Generation Gap

Rethinking the Showroom Generation Gap | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Scott Bergeron


The magazine’s newest contributor says the relationship between old car dawgs and new-age techies doesn’t have to be tumultuous.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


It happens in virtually every dealership: There’s a war between veteran salespeople who were brought up with four-squares, sales boards, production-based commissions and tenacious closing skills — a.k.a. old car dawgs — and the iPhone 6-wearing, social media-following, email-quoting, unaggressive new-age techies.


Old car dawgs look at the techies and see clerks, while techies look at the old dawgs and see dinosaurs. Whether your sales team includes more dawgs, more techies or an even mix, you know each generation brings a unique talent to your sales floor and your bottom line. By combining the best of both worlds, you can really make a positive impact on performance and profits.


Customer Preferences


Think about today’s typical car shopper. Armed with ample resources to research pricing, quality and reliability before visiting a dealership, this shopper tends to be much more savvy and well-informed than in years past. This shopper also wants to be “enrolled” in the car buying process, not hard-sold.


That said, today’s car shoppers still have a strong desire to meet an expert who can answer questions and guide them through the process. Mere order-takers aren’t going to fulfill expectations, and the same goes for the salesperson more interested in hard-selling than listening.


That’s why the best solution is to combine the tools and techniques utilized by dawgs and techies. Somewhere in the mix is the right blend of listening, providing information and offering solid guidance — all in an environment in which the prospect feels heard, respected and comfortable.


There’s a lot of opportunity in today’s marketplace and countless ways for customers to reach your dealership. This ultimately gives you more options to create unique processes and cultures in your store, close more deals and add market share.


The challenge I’ve seen in most dealerships is that dawgs and techies spend too much energy battling each other, typically with little intervention or direction from the higher-ups. Both sides are left to their own devices, ultimately costing everyone more deals. It’s totally insane that all this energy is spent internally rather than being used to improve performance storewide.


And that’s where you come in. You are their leader, coach and mentor. You know that each sales type has unique talents. If you can create a culture and processes to marry the two, you can create an atmosphere of productive focus, accountability and teamwork.


Veteran Presence


If you’re a young dealer or manager, take a moment to consider the state of today’s auto industry from the perspective of your old car dawgs. For years, all they needed was a pencil, a worksheet, a little common sense and personality, and a desk man who knew how to work the deals. Veteran salespeople have talent and experience, and they know how to close. So they are far from being dinosaurs.


But today, more than 80% of all prospects are researching and sometimes even purchasing through the Internet. What’s a talented and tenacious old car dawg to do? The solution is simple: Combine their experience and talent with the techies’ digital acumen. Not only do the techies get to learn new (OK, maybe old) techniques, but the old dawgs can learn a thing or two about embracing new technologies and techies as a whole. Here are four key points to keep in mind:


1. Today’s customers need space, but they still need to be closed.

Fewer than five years ago, the average customer visited as many as four dealerships before he or she bought. Today, customers will visit fewer than two stores. Do the math: If a prospect is in your dealership and is not taking delivery, you won’t get a second chance, no matter how good your follow-up efforts are. Hence, an old, nasty term called the “turnover” is making a huge comeback, especially with big dealer groups. I’m not talking about the TO to F&I; I’m talking about the act of introducing a prospect to a second, more experienced salesperson who can keep the deal moving forward. It’s an old-school concept that is proving highly effective for those who are employing it.


2. Put first things first.

As a sales manager or dealer, you must honestly assess your sales team. We know nobody wants to be pigeonholed or put into a category, but each salesperson has strengths and weaknesses. And each leans one way more than another. You need to decide who is more experienced, who is less experienced and who you think would be able to help his or her peers with setting more appointments, learning more technology and, yes, even taking a turnover when he or she is available.


3. Split deals still equal one whole deal for the store.

Create a workable marriage between the two distinct sales types and you can develop several two-person teams that can help each other when they most need it. I’m not advocating teaming everyone up for every deal; just when they could use the help. In addition to ramping up units and gross, the high-profile example of this type of teamwork can quickly become standard practice.


4. Implement a no-exception TO policy.

Once your team sees how successful a proper turnover can be, they’ll adopt it, and the dollars added to their commissions or paychecks will ensure they’ll never abandon it. After all, the primary motivator is money, and this is a solid way to make more of it.


A long-term goal for every dealer and manager is to help their sales teams work together in increasingly effective ways. Convince your old car dawgs and new-age techies to step outside their traditional roles and embrace a hybrid approach that’s both timeless and timely. Nobody wants to split a deal, but when the choice is between securing the deal or no deal, it’s your store and your rules. Your salespeople will ultimately thank you for the boost in their commissions.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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Professional Women: How Do You Succeed in Today’s Competitive Landscape

Professional Women: How Do You Succeed in Today’s Competitive Landscape | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Lorraine K. Lee


Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg’s recent post about how women remain underrepresented in the workplace has brought new light to just how far off companies are in reaching equality in the C-Suite (it’s more than 100 years away!).


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


What will it take for the gap to close? How can companies and coworkers help bridge this divide? Share your best advice on how to succeed as a woman in the workplace, and tag your deck #WomenInLeadership.


It’s In the Numbers

Sandberg’s nonprofit Lean In partnered with consulting firm McKinsey to conduct the survey referenced in Sandberg’s post. Among their findings? Women are not leaving faster than men (SVP-level women are 20% less likely to leave); senior-level women are less interested in advancing than their male counterparts (although entry- and mid-level women share similar aspirations toward getting promoted); and women of color are 43% more interested in becoming a top exec than white women.


Women in the Workplace 2015 from Lean In


20/20/20

Sidekick shares 20 lessons from 20 women worth more than $20 million. The deck incorporates successes, failures, and words of wisdom from individuals ranging from Sheryl Sandberg and Taylor Swift to Oprah Winfrey and Serena Williams. View what these powerhouses have to say:


20 Lessons From 20 Women Worth Over $20 Million from Sidekick


Scaling Your Business

How can you counteract the fact that female-owned firms are smaller than others — and might even be shrinking? This deck provides a 4-step program to help women grow their businesses successfully:

BEYOND SOLO: Female Entrepreneurs Who Scale Successfully from Bruce Kasanoff


Women in Politics

This PSA by UN Women features Suits’ Meghan Markle. “Today less than one-quarter of the world’s leaders are women. We need more because, when women lead, the world changes. We’re working to create a world where women lead.” See how you can join the movement.

When women lead, the world changes - UN Women’s Advocate Meghan Mar... from UN Women


A First-Hand Account

This illustrated deck by engineer and Fittr co-founder Kiki Schirr shows a typical week as a female engineer. View the entertaining deck here:

What's it like being a Woman in Tech? from Kiki Schirr


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


http://www.techautocareers.com

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Leading Outside Your Comfort Zone

Leading Outside Your Comfort Zone | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Morgan Browning


Stepping outside your comfort zone to accommodate the strengths of others, you convey a higher level of appreciation & confidence, and that ultimately bolsters how your employees perceive you.


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


When I get asked what the hardest thing about leading a growing company is, I run through the spectrum of challenges I face...worrying about cash flow, understanding our customer perceptions, thinking about where we should be in 2016, dealing with the architect on how we're redesigning our offices to fit more people in...but I believe that sometimes the hardest challenge is mindset.


I have a distinctive set of preferences for how I go about my work. Anyone who knows me, knows that I love mixing it up, I want people to think big (and back it up with data) and I don't need all the details because I place a lot of trust in my teams and believe they'll get things done.


I know though that this mindset certainly isn't shared by all my employees and even our small senior leadership team. And that's good! But it also means I need to lead differently than I might like.


Leading out of your comfort zone is extremely challenging but brings big benefits. Let me illustrate what this looks like with a story of one of our clients.


Kevin is the CEO of a local company with 2,000 employees, and he dreads town hall week. Once a quarter he holds 10 town-hall- style meetings for employees who want to get information about the organization and ask questions. Kevin would much rather convey the information via newsletter and answer questions by email, but he knows that's not what is best for the organization. By the end of town hall week Kevin is actually re-invigorated, optimistic and glad he came up with the idea. He feels this way until town hall looms on the calendar the next quarter, when he begins to dread it again.


This is a great example of a leader leading outside his or her comfort zone. The truth is that as a leader, you will undoubtedly be asked to perform tasks that are outside your normal, preferred way of acting. You're expected to recognize what is best for the organization and to meet each situation whether or not it is within your comfort zone.


The fact is, leading outside the comfort zone has direct benefits for your employees. This leadership style allows them to live inside their comfort zones and be more productive.


In Kevin's situation employee surveys showed a desire for the company's leaders to be more visible and accessible. Although this wasn't a crisis situation, Kevin recognized the potential direct benefit of doing it, and his comfort level simply did not matter.


The employees appreciated Kevin's appearances, but he also gained valuable information about his organization that simply would not have been available had he just written a newsletter. He got employees' perceptions, heard their major concerns and complaints, and like it or not, got a report on what's new in the rumor mill. He created an environment where employees felt heard and respected and that bred confidence and productivity.


Leading outside your comfort zone shows empathy, which is key to leadership in 2015. Your employees don't know or care about your comfort level. They care that you took the time to do whatever it took to address a situation. When you crack a joke, tell a story, or shed a tear in front of your staff, you open lines of communication that a newsletter simply cannot.


No matter what the activity, remember that progress is often made outside the comfort zone. The organization is the primary beneficiary, but personal growth is also a byproduct. And just as a reminder, operating outside your comfort zone doesn't mean you are not being authentic. It shows the moral compass and dedication that authentic leaders possess. I am certainly not suggesting that we live outside our comfort zone all of the time — only that we take frequent trips away from it to reap all the rewards that new experiences and perspectives provide.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.


Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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If You Have A Fender-Bender On A Test Drive, Who's Liable: You Or The Dealer?

If You Have A Fender-Bender On A Test Drive, Who's Liable: You Or The Dealer? | TechAutoCareers.com® | Scoop.it

By: Richard Read


When you're shopping for a new ride, you always take a test drive, right? But what happens if you're in an accident during those 15 or 30 minutes? Who can be sued?


Shared: From your friends #*@TechAutoCareers.com®* the online resource for the *Automotive Sales Fraternity™*


That question was recently posed in a Colorado court of law, and as Auto News reports, the dealership was found to be just as liable -- and sue-able -- as the test-driver.


JOINT VENTURE

The case involved a woman named Kristin Hart, who test-drove a vehicle from Go Courtesy Ford in Littleton, Colorado while accompanied by a salesperson. Hart hit another vehicle and was found to be at fault, so the other driver's insurer, American Family Mutual Insurance Company, filed a negligence claim.


But American Family didn't just file that claim against Hart. It also named Go Courtesy Ford.


How? The company claimed that the test drive constituted a joint venture between Hart and Go Courtesy Ford.


A joint venture typically involves two entities working together on a particular project or goal. Because Hart and the salesperson had already negotiated a sales price on the vehicle, American Family argued that the joint project was, quite simply, conducting a test drive to wrap up the deal. Go Courtesy Ford, on the other hand, insisted that Hart and the dealership rep had very different goals and therefore couldn't have been in a joint venture.


RESULTS

Round One went to the defense, with a district court taking the side of Go Courtesy (now known as AutoNation Ford Littleton).


During Round Two, however, judges on the Colorado Court of Appeals unanimously bought American Family's argument. The justices said that Hart and Go Courtesy not only had a common goal, but both also had the right to control the test vehicle. Legally speaking, those are two of the hallmarks of joint ventures.


What's interesting is that if the sales rep hadn't accompanied Hart on her test drive, American Family may not have had a case. If Hart had gone it alone, judicial precedent would suggest that Go Courtesy Ford couldn't be held liable for her negligence because it had no ability to control the vehicle. But because the dealership had someone in the car with her, it became the dealership's right -- nay, responsibility -- to control the car if Hart was negligent.


Expect this one to go to the state supreme court -- and to generate a lot of discussion along the way.


About I.C. Collins


I.C. Collins is grateful that he can pursue something that is both interesting and has value on several levels. For over three decades in the Automotive Sales Industry a bottom-line guy Collins doesn't shy away from telling the truth in ways that cut through the noise to deliver streetwise and corporate knowledge from someone who's been there and done that, many times over.


He aims to create “a long-lasting major brand that for generations is a company that is business-critical to the leading brands in the world. We are focused every day on creating something that’s valuable and has permanence.”


P. S. Urgent if you’re looking to optimize your interpersonal skills for success get your copy of " How to Succeed in the Automotive Sales Industry " today @TechAutoCareers.com. Then settle in for a satisfying read that will surely enhance your interpersonal skills for success this year, it is not just a book we are a service.

 

Visit us at http://www.techautocareers.com

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