Autoimmunity
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Rescooped by Ricardo Pujol Borrell from Immunopathology & Immunotherapy
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The role of dendritic cells in autoimmunity

The role of dendritic cells in autoimmunity | Autoimmunity | Scoop.it

The role of dendritic cells in autoimmunityDipyaman Ganguly,Stefan Haak,Vanja Sisirak& Boris ReizisAffiliationsCorresponding authorNature Reviews Immunology13,566–577(2013)doi:10.1038/nri3477


Via Alfredo Corell
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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, July 27, 2013 2:56 PM

Dendritic cells (DCs) initiate and shape both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Accordingly, recent evidence from clinical studies and experimental models implicates DCs in the pathogenesis of most autoimmune diseases. However, fundamental questions remain unanswered concerning the actual roles of DCs in autoimmunity, both in general and, in particular, in specific diseases. In this Review, we discuss the proposed roles of DCs in immunological tolerance, the effect of the gain or loss of DCs on autoimmunity and DC-intrinsic molecular regulators that help to prevent the development of autoimmunity. We also review the emerging roles of DCs in several autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune myocarditis, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, type 1 diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus.

Rescooped by Ricardo Pujol Borrell from Immunopathology & Immunotherapy
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Natural killer cell deficiency

Natural killer cell deficiency | Autoimmunity | Scoop.it

Via Alfredo Corell
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Interesting review

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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:06 PM
The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume 132, Issue 3 , Pages 515-525, September 2013Natural killer cell deficiencyJordan S. Orange, MD, PhD


Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune defense against infection and cancer and are especially useful in combating certain viral pathogens. The utility of NK cells in human health has been underscored by a growing number of persons who are deficient in NK cells and/or their functions. This can be in the context of a broader genetically defined congenital immunodeficiency, of which there are more than 40 presently known to impair NK cells. However, the abnormality of NK cells in certain cases represents the majority immunologic defect. In aggregate, these conditions are termed NK cell deficiency. Recent advances have added clarity to this diagnosis and identified defects in 3 genes that can cause NK cell deficiency, as well as some of the underlying biology. Appropriate consideration of these diagnoses and patients raises the potential for rational therapeutic options and further innovation.