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Create an interactive presentation with WalkMe

Create an interactive presentation with WalkMe | Autism Supports | Scoop.it

Using WalkMe's advanced Editor, you can create walk-thru's within minutes, without any technical knowledge, all by using a simple point and click interface.


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Autism Supports
Resources to help support students with autism, professional development tools for teachers, and support materials for families.
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Gastrointestinal symptoms reported by moms more common in kids with autism

Gastrointestinal symptoms reported by moms more common in kids with autism | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
Gastrointestinal symptoms reported by mothers were more common and more often persistent in the first three years of life in children with autism spectrum disorder than in children with typical development and developmental delay, according to an...

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Game played in sync increases children’s perceived similarity, closeness

Game played in sync increases children’s perceived similarity, closeness | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
What helps children who have just met form a connection? A new study shows that a simple game played together in sync on a computer led 8-year-olds to report a greater sense of similarity and closeness immediately after the activity.

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Autism Summer Seminar: Mirror Neurons, Empathy and Autism

Autism Summer Seminar: Mirror Neurons, Empathy and Autism | Autism Supports | Scoop.it

This brief but intense summer seminar will provide participants with the opportunity to critically examine research concerning mirror neurons as well as the role mirror neurons have come to play in providing an explanation of a variety of psychological phenomena, in particular the role mirror neurons are alleged to play in the foundations of autism. The summer seminar will provide a formal occasion and central location for philosophers and scholars from various disciplines from around the world to work together to critically analyze the neuroscience research of mirror neurons, as well as the implications that research has had in how autism is now conceptualized and treated.


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Some children lose autism diagnosis but still struggle - Science Daily

Some children lose autism diagnosis but still struggle - Science Daily | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
About one in 14 toddlers diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder no longer met the diagnostic criteria in elementary school, but most continued to have emotional/behavior symptoms and required special education supports, according to a new study.
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Many Young Adults With Autism Struggling - Disability Scoop

Many Young Adults With Autism Struggling - Disability Scoop | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
Young adults with autism are facing significant challenges after high school, a new report suggests, with many on the spectrum finding themselves unemployed, isolated and lacking services.
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Some children lose autism diagnosis but still struggle - Medical Xpress

Some children lose autism diagnosis but still struggle - Medical Xpress | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
About one in 14 toddlers diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) no longer met the diagnostic criteria in elementary school, but most continued to have emotional/behavior symptoms and required special education supports, according to a study...
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Researchers Find Clue to Cause of Tics in Tourette Syndrome

Researchers Find Clue to Cause of Tics in Tourette Syndrome | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
The tics seen in Tourette syndrome may be caused by the loss of specific neurons in the brain, a Yale University study has demonstrated.

The findings, which provide a clue to the cause of the symptoms that afflict millions of Tourette patients worldwide, are described in the Jan. 5 online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Previous postmortem studies of people with severe forms of the disease showed that there was a decrease in a rare but important type of neuron in the dorsal striatum, deep within the brain. A team led by Christopher Pittenger, associate professor of psychiatry, investigated whether loss of those neurons could cause the symptoms.

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Researchers Discover 'Idiosyncratic' Brain Patterns in Autism

Researchers Discover 'Idiosyncratic' Brain Patterns in Autism | Autism Supports | Scoop.it

"This image shows a comparison in the extent of the voxel deviation from the typical profile two individuals with autism. The individual with the more severe autism symptoms (right) showed greater deviations, both positive (more red) and negative (lighter blue), from the typical inter-hemispheric connectivity pattern compared to the individual with the less severe autism symptoms (left). In other words, the deviations from the control pattern was larger in the participant with the more severe symptoms. Image credit: Carnegie Mellon University."

 

"Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been studied for many years, but there are still many more questions than answers. For example, some research into the brain functions of individuals with autism spectrum have found a lack of synchronization (‘connectivity’) between different parts of the brain that normally work in tandem. But other studies have found the exact opposite – over-synchronization in the brains of those with ASD.


"New research recently published in Nature Neuroscience suggests that the various reports — of both over- and under-connectivity — may, in fact, reflect a deeper principle of brain function. Led by scientists at the Weizmann Institute and Carnegie Mellon University, the study shows that the brains of individuals with autism display unique synchronization patterns, something that could impact earlier diagnosis of the disorder and future treatments."


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Autism Speaks offers grants for lifesaving swim lessons - KRQE News 13

Autism Speaks offers grants for lifesaving swim lessons - KRQE News 13 | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
"Ian, Ian, Ian," squeals 8-year-old Anna as she spots her friend across a pool in the South Bronx. She splashes with excitement until he gin…
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ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) - Study of siblings with autism reveals surprising results

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) - Study of siblings with autism reveals surprising results | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
With symptoms that can range from missed social cues to severe linguistic and cognitive impairments, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has proved a complex condition for geneticists to get their heads around.

Now the largest study to date based on the whole genome sequences of siblings with ASD, together with their non-autistic parents, is throwing a genetic spotlight on those complexities and yielding some surprises.

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Monkeys' amygdala neurons are important in guiding behaviour toward internally generated distant goals

Nature Neuroscience | doi:10.1038/nn.3925

 

Working with monkeys, researchers conclude that "neuronal planning activity in the amygdala suggests that this structure is important in guiding behaviour toward internally generated, distant goals."


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Study: Harnessing a virtual reality brain training game to diagnose mild cognitive impairment (MCI) | SharpBrains

Study: Harnessing a virtual reality brain training game to diagnose mild cognitive impairment (MCI) | SharpBrains | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
Vir­tual real­ity brain train­ing game can detect mild cog­ni­tive impair­ment, a con­di­tion that often pre­dates Alzheimer’s dis­ease (press release):

“Geek researchers demon­strated the poten­tial of a vir­tual super­mar­ket cog­ni­tive train­ing game as a screen­ing tool for patients with mild cog­ni­tive impair­ment (MCI) among a sam­ple of older adults…

In an arti­cle pub­lished in the Jour­nal of Alzheimer’s Dis­ease, the researchers have indi­cated that the vir­tual super­mar­ket (VSM) appli­ca­tion displayed…a level of diag­nos­tic accu­racy sim­i­lar to stan­dard­ized neu­ropsy­cho­log­i­cal tests, which are the gold stan­dard for MCI screen­ing. Patients with MCI can live inde­pen­dently and not all such patients progress to AD. There­fore the global effort against cog­ni­tive dis­or­ders is focused on early detec­tion at the MCI stage…

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How the Brain Listens to Literature

How the Brain Listens to Literature | Autism Supports | Scoop.it

"Brain maps illustrating activation clusters for the Mentalizing regressor contrasted against the Action regressor (red) and the Action regressor contrasted against the Mentalizing regressor (blue). All activations are corrected for the multiple comparisons at p less than 0.05. Image credit: Annabel D. Nijhof/Roel M. Willems/PLOS ONE."

 

"When we listen to stories, we immerse ourselves into the situations described and empathise with the feelings of the characters. Only recently has it become possible to find out how exactly this process works in the brain. Roel Willems and Annabel Nijhof have now succeeded using an fMRI scanner to measure how people listen to a literary story. Scientific journal PLOS ONEpublishes the results on February 11."

 

"Researchers use neuroimaging technology to measure how people immerse themselves in situations and empathize with characters when listening to literature."


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What's Different About The Brains Of People With Autism?

What's Different About The Brains Of People With Autism? | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
There's growing evidence that the difference involves the fibers that carry information from one part of the brain to another. Brain scans of people with autism show a lack of synchrony between different areas of the brain.

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ASD Diagnosis With Saliva Test Sees Early Success In Study

ASD Diagnosis With Saliva Test Sees Early Success In Study | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
Testing proteins in a child's saliva could someday alert physicians to a possibility of autism spectrum disorder.

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Autism and prodigy share a common genetic link: study

Autism and prodigy share a common genetic link: study | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
Researchers have uncovered the first evidence of a genetic link between prodigy and autism. The scientists found that child prodigies in their sample share some of the same genetic variations with people who have autism.

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Five-year-old’s microwave fixation inspires books to help children with autism

Five-year-old’s microwave fixation inspires books to help children with autism | Autism Supports | Scoop.it

Fixation is one of the challenges that children on the autism spectrum face every single day. For five-year-old Sera Lutes, her fixation on the family s microwave oven became so hard to deal with that they had to reach out to her teacher for help. Astoundingly, it appeared that it was all the help they needed [ ] The post Five-year-old s microwave fixation inspires books to help children with autism appeared first on Autism Daily Newscast.


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Autism may carry a benefit: a buffer against Alzheimer’s

Autism may carry a benefit:  a buffer against Alzheimer’s | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
Brain plasticity of people with autism may protect them from Alzheimer’s disease, scientists propose.
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Study Pinpoints Autism Linked Protein for Sculpting Brain Connections

Study Pinpoints Autism Linked Protein for Sculpting Brain Connections | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
A new study provides a close up of synapse refinement and identifies a protein that is crucial in this process.

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Brain study shows inflammation is a marker of autism

Brain study shows inflammation is a marker of autism | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
Using the largest data set for a study on gene expression and autism, researchers found the brains of people with autism have inflammation response genes perpetually turned on.

 

Summary from BrainHQ December 2014

A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins and the University of Alabama has found that people who have autism have a “pattern of inflammation” in the brain. The researchers analyzed data from brain samples of people with and without autism, and found that in those with autism, their inflammation response genes appear to be in a permanent ON position.


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People with autism have uniquely synched brains - Futurity

People with autism have uniquely synched brains - Futurity | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
In an effort to understand autism spectrum disorder (ASD), researchers have zeroed in on synchronization between different parts of the brain. Some of the findings have suggested a lack of synchronization (connectivity), while other studies have found the exact opposite: over synchronization.

A new study published in Nature Neuroscience suggests the various reports of both over- and under-connectivity may reflect a deeper principle of brain function. The findings show that the brains of individuals with autism display unique synchronization patterns.

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Human Speech’s Surprising Influence on Young Infants: Northwestern University News

Human Speech’s Surprising Influence on Young Infants: Northwestern University News | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
EVANSTON, Ill. --- America’s preoccupation with the “word gap”— the idea that parents in impoverished homes speak less to their children, which, in turn, predicts outcomes like school achievement and income later in life — has skyrocketed in recent years, leading to a rise in educational initiatives aiming to narrow the achievement gap by teaching young children more words.

In a forthcoming article titled “Listen Up! Speech Is for Thinking During Infancy,” to be published in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Northwestern University psychologist Sandra Waxman and New York University’s Athena Vouloumanos broaden the scope of this issue by assessing the impact of human speech on infant cognition in the first year of life.

“It’s not because [children] have low vocabularies that they fail to achieve later on. That’s far too simple,” said Waxman, the Louis W. Menk Chair in Psychology, a professor of cognitive psychology and a fellow in the University’s Institute for Policy Research. “The vocabulary of a child — raised in poverty or in plenty — is really an index of the larger context in which language participates.”

Consequently, Vouloumanos advocates speaking to infants, not only “because it will teach them more words,” she said, but because “listening to speech promotes the babies’ acquisition of the fundamental cognitive and social psychological capacities that form the foundation for subsequent learning.” 

 

Summary from Learning & the Brain Society Newsletter - January 2015

Human speech has consequences for infants that go beyond learning words  

Northwestern University

 

An article published in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Northwestern University psychologist Sandra Waxman and New York University's Athena Vouloumanos reveal from a series of new findings the surprising impact of human speech on infant cognition in the first year; listening to speech promotes much more than language-learning alone. Vouloumanos emphasizes speaking to infants, not only "because it will teach them more words," she said, but because "listening to speech promotes the babies' acquisition of the fundamental cognitive and social psychological capacities that form the foundation for subsequent learning."


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Music helps kids focus their attention, control their emotions, and diminish their anxiety

Music helps kids focus their attention, control their emotions, and diminish their anxiety | Autism Supports | Scoop.it

Summary from Learning & the Brain Society Newsletter - January 2015

Playing music to improve children's brains 

University of Vermont

 

A University of Vermont College of Medicine child psychiatry team has published new research in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

Matthew Albaugh, Ph.D., and graduate student research assistant Eileen Crehan, call their study "the largest investigation of the association between playing a musical instrument and brain development." The research continues Hudziak's work with the National Institutes of Health Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Study of Normal Brain Development. Using its database, the team analyzed the brain scans of 232 children ages 6 to 18. What they found is that musical training might also help kids focus their attention, control their emotions and diminish their anxiety. 


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Study: Can self-monitoring help promote academic success, and reduce ADHD symptoms, in college students with ADHD | SharpBrains

Study: Can self-monitoring help promote academic success, and reduce ADHD symptoms, in college students with ADHD | SharpBrains | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
. College students with ADHD are more likely to drop out than other students, have lower grade point averages, and endorse more academic difficulties overall. 

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The Federal Trade Commission orders Focus Education to stop making unsubstantiated brain training claims | SharpBrains

The Federal Trade Commission orders Focus Education to stop making unsubstantiated brain training claims | SharpBrains | Autism Supports | Scoop.it
Mak­ers of Jun­gle Rangers Com­puter Game for Kids Set­tle FTC Charges that They Deceived Con­sumers with Base­less “Brain Train­ing” Claims (Fed­eral Trade Commission):

“A Texas com­pany and its offi­cers must stop mak­ing unsub­stan­ti­ated claims that their com­puter game, Jun­gle Rangers, per­ma­nently improves children’s focus, mem­ory, atten­tion, behav­ior, and school per­for­mance, includ­ing for chil­dren with atten­tion deficit hyper­ac­tiv­ity dis­or­der (ADHD), under a Fed­eral Trade Com­mis­sion set­tle­ment…

The FTC’s admin­is­tra­tive com­plaint states that Focus Edu­ca­tion, its chief exec­u­tive offi­cer, Michael Apstein, and its chief finan­cial offi­cer, John Able, have mar­keted and sold the ifo­cus Sys­tem, includ­ing the Jun­gle Rangers com­puter game, via tele­vi­sion infomer­cials and the company’s web­sites for $214.75 plus tax, gen­er­at­ing sales of approx­i­mately $4.5 mil­lion between 2012 and the mid­dle of 2013.

The adver­tise­ments claimed that Jun­gle Rangers had “sci­en­tif­i­cally proven mem­ory and atten­tion brain train­ing exer­cises, designed to improve focus, con­cen­tra­tion and mem­ory” and touted the soft­ware as giv­ing chil­dren “the abil­ity to focus, com­plete school work, home­work, and to stay on task.” Focus Education’s web­site implied that these ben­e­fits would be permanent…

The FTC has charged that Focus Edu­ca­tion and its offi­cers vio­lated the FTC Act by mak­ing false or unsub­stan­ti­ated claims that the ifo­cus Sys­tem per­ma­nently improves children’s focus, mem­ory, atten­tion, behav­ior, and/or school per­for­mance, includ­ing in chil­dren with ADHD. The com­pany also allegedly falsely claimed that these ben­e­fits were sci­en­tif­i­cally proven.”

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