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8 Apps for Aspiring Novelists | Mac|Life

8 Apps for Aspiring Novelists | Mac|Life | Novelist | Scoop.it
There's no perfect formula for crafting a novel. In fact, some of the best tales that withstand the tests of time are the ones that break the rules and invent a new narrative. The simplest of ideas can blow up into 100,000 words of ...

Via Jon Samuelson
Katherine Conner's insight:

Everyone, without exception, requires a tool to complete the task that they were employed to do. Often, when writing, people may not know where to begin. They may not have any idea as to how to organize their thoughts. The applications suggested by AJ Dellinger on Mac Life seem like an excellent way to structure not only the key points within your story, but also helps you structure your time in order to incorporate those key points. The application "Novel in 30" allows the user to set a word count target, and a deadline goal. It also allows you to sync the document between itunes and allows the use of Dropbox for easy access. "Writers App" helps structure all ideas dealing with plot, character, and setting. "MindNode"allows the user to create a literal map of their thoughts, and therefore allowing the user to re-create or continue their previous thought process at a later time. Other applications discussed in this article assist with research, brainstorming, timing, and even publication! I think these applications will prove to be powerful tools not only for aspiring novelists, but also authors who are veterans of the writing and publication processes. Each story that a person decides to tell is individual, so each journey to bring that story to an audience is just as individual.

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Novelist
An exploration of a career in writing.
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National Novel Writing Month

National Novel Writing Month | Novelist | Scoop.it
Thirty days and nights of literary abandon
Katherine Conner's insight:

NaNoWriMo, short for National Novel Writing Month, takes place in November every year. NaNoWriMo affords people who have always wanted to write a novel but never had the obligation to sit down (or walk if you have a treadmill desk — yes, those do exist!) and write, to do just that! Because National Novel Writing Month lasts for only thirty days, the goal is quantity, not quality. So while NaNoWriMo provides an excellent regimen  in order to get your novel written, it may not be the best option if you are trying to get your story published. NaNoWriMo has very few rules, and all of them are very simple. You must begin writing no earlier than November first, and you must finish  no later than midnight on November thritieth, local time. You must start from scratch! While you are permitted to conjure up characters, plots, and outlines, you must begin writing no earlier than November first! Your story must be a work of fiction, and at least fifty thousand words long in order to have completed the task. You must also be the only author of your work. And finally, you are not allowed to write one word or phrase fifty thousand times.  

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5 ineffective words writers should ditch | Articles | Home

5 ineffective words writers should ditch | Articles | Home | Novelist | Scoop.it
These all too common words and phrases add little more than extra syllables to your content. They're vague, redundant, and overused. (Five ineffective and overused words to ditch in writing.
Katherine Conner's insight:

This article expresses the reasons why certain overused words or phrases should not be used in writing. Some of these words have lost their emphasis from overuse. Other words have so many meanings that they should be used only with extremely specific context. Yet another group of these highly ineffective words are quite simply too vague for most any situation. No matter which  previous reason applies, all of these words have become ineffective for writing, professional or otherwise. As a student, I am often told to avoid certain words in essays and papers. Not only does this article further my list of words to avoid, it elaborates on the reasons behind why these words are, or have become, ineffective. Using the words and phrases in this article - "just," "really," "a lot," "kind of" - lowers the professionalism, effectiveness, overall quality of a piece of writing. Most importantly, if a piece is poorly written, even if the idea is fantastic and inspiring, the emotional and mental impact on a person may be reduced.

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Looking for Alaska Five Years After the Printz Award

Katherine Conner's insight:

In this video, posted in January of 2011, Printz and Edgar award-winning young adult novelist John Green discusses winning the Printz award and everything that required the forming of his book "Looking for Alaska." In this video, John further elaborates on just how many people he needed in order to finish writing his book. It also provides a more accurate look at just how long it really takes to write a book. (In John's case, three years.) Also, as much as it may pain you to delete half of what you have, most writing is actually re-writing. (As proved by how many times John revised his book.) Also, John stresses an extremely peculiar, yet perfectly sensical point. He says that the "buisness of books" is done by its readers. Every reader will have a different perspective on the smallest details of the book, interpreting single glances from a character or lines of dialogue differently.

 

Personally, I greatly admire John's honesty in this video. Many people would like to take all the credit for their book. Also, the honest and genuine way in which John presents his story shows that he isn't just being humble. The creation of a good story often comes from more than one person. That story becomes even greater and longer when people read it, discuss it, and are able to take something from it.

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(EN) - Book Publishing Glossary | Nathan Bransford

(EN) - Book Publishing Glossary | Nathan Bransford | Novelist | Scoop.it

Check out this blog post by Nathan Bransford, the author of the Jacob Wonderbar series"


Via Stefano KaliFire
Katherine Conner's insight:

This is a blog post by Nathan Bransford, author of such books as  Jacob Wonderbar and the Cosmic Space Kapow (Dial, May 2011), Jacob Wonderbar for President of the Universe (Dial, April 2012) and Jacob Wonderbar and the Interstellar Time Warp. Before becoming an author himself, Bransford was a literary agent. In this blog post, he shines a light on many terms and the meaning of those terms that every aspiring author should know. This glossary shows the meaning of monetary terms (such as "advance" and "co-op"), to  what may be little-known publishing terms ( such as "ARC" and "copyeditor") to slang authors may use ("the Big Six"), to the physical parts of books ("book plates"). This could be a helpful tool to authors trying to publish their debut book, because people who are more knowledgable in their field more likely to get a good job, or in this case, get published.

 

Often, in new situations people may come off as inexperienced, unprofessional, or awkward if they do not know the meanings of commonplace words. While they may have a brilliant mind, or excellent writing skill is, they may not be taken seriously.

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Caren Cantrell's curator insight, July 3, 2013 6:55 PM

A quick easy reference for understanding the jargon of the publishing industry.

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Novel Writing Tips & Fundamentals – Storyfix.com

Novel Writing Tips & Fundamentals – Storyfix.com | Novelist | Scoop.it
Novel Writing, Screenwriting and Storytelling Tips & Fundamentals
Katherine Conner's insight:

This blog post, written by storyfix.com (which was rated the 2011 "Best Blog for Writers"), guides you on what is the most important aspect before you begin writing: vision. It is often said that the majority of writing is actually re-writing. However, with proper vision, the amount of re-writing required to perfect your storyline can be minimized. Vision is having an idea of where you want your story to go, both in plot terms and publication terms. This blog post contains an extremely accurate analogy: your vision for your story is your blueprint. Just as an architect can not construct a building with a blueprint, you cannot write a good story without having any idea of where your plot is going to take your characters. 

The author also suggests that in order to write a best-selling novel, you have to envision it to be a best-selling novel. This suggestion reminded me of an anonymous quote, "Shoot for the moon, and if you miss, you'll land among the stars." While your novel may not become a best-seller (the moon),  you still got it published (therefore, landing among the stars!) 
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How to Manage Your Story's Characters | Stavros Halvatzis

How to Manage Your Story's Characters | Stavros Halvatzis | Novelist | Scoop.it
This post suggest a practical way of keeping your characters on track during the writing process. (Great writing tips, as usual.
Katherine Conner's insight:

This blog post, written by Stavros Halvatzis, who has Ph.D in narrative studies along with many other prestigious accomplishments, explains how Stavros Halvatzis works on his character development. He provides a ratio of negative character traits to positive character traits. He also only allows major change in the views or morals of a character after main plot points. By following these steps, or creating your own variations of the steps, your story will make sense and will avoid criticism of a lack of character development. This article will also help you with the timing of your plot points. For example, unless the character is either minor or meant to be mysterious and enigmatic, it would not be a good idea to have them leave the story in the first or second chapters.

Character development is usually the first aspect that comes one's  mind when analyzing or reviewing a book or story. Sometimes, the author knows their character inside-out, and subconsciously decides that the reader does too.

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8 Apps for Aspiring Novelists | Mac|Life

8 Apps for Aspiring Novelists | Mac|Life | Novelist | Scoop.it
There's no perfect formula for crafting a novel. In fact, some of the best tales that withstand the tests of time are the ones that break the rules and invent a new narrative. The simplest of ideas can blow up into 100,000 words of ...

Via Jon Samuelson
Katherine Conner's insight:

Everyone, without exception, requires a tool to complete the task that they were employed to do. Often, when writing, people may not know where to begin. They may not have any idea as to how to organize their thoughts. The applications suggested by AJ Dellinger on Mac Life seem like an excellent way to structure not only the key points within your story, but also helps you structure your time in order to incorporate those key points. The application "Novel in 30" allows the user to set a word count target, and a deadline goal. It also allows you to sync the document between itunes and allows the use of Dropbox for easy access. "Writers App" helps structure all ideas dealing with plot, character, and setting. "MindNode"allows the user to create a literal map of their thoughts, and therefore allowing the user to re-create or continue their previous thought process at a later time. Other applications discussed in this article assist with research, brainstorming, timing, and even publication! I think these applications will prove to be powerful tools not only for aspiring novelists, but also authors who are veterans of the writing and publication processes. Each story that a person decides to tell is individual, so each journey to bring that story to an audience is just as individual.

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