Australians Past and Present
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Australians Past and Present
This page focuses on the world achievements by Australians past and present for stage 3 (year 5/6).
Curated by Nicole Cowley
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Famous Indigenous Australians, Indigenous people today, Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders

Famous Indigenous Australians, Indigenous people today, Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders | Australians Past and Present | Scoop.it
Famous Indigenous Australians, Indigenous people today, Aboriginal people and Torres Strait Islanders, SOSE, Year 6, SA Famous Indigenous Australians Many of Australia's Indigenous people have worked hard and achieved local and international fame...
Nicole Cowley's insight:

This web page is part of the skwirk.com.au interactive schooling website.  The website is an interactive site in which children, teachers and parents can become members and access an of the site. Students are asked to put in their schooling year and the information in which they are shown is specific to the year and topics covered in each state. This particular topic contains information regarding famous Indigenous Aboriginals. Some of these will be known to the students and some not so known, if known at all. Indigenous Aboriginals mentioned and description given include Cathy Freeman (sportswomen), Albert Namatijra (artist), Noel Pearson (activist), Kath Walker (Oodgeroo Nooncal) (poet), Neville Bonner (first Indigenous politician), and Pat O’Shane (NSW Magistrate). Others are mentioned with a one or two line description. This could lead to discussion as to why the site has chosen particular people to give a deeper description and not the others. The site also has images of Indigenous Aboriginals, those mentioned above, however to view these you need to sign up to the site. The site has links to spelling tests, three for three different levels. This page can be assessed by students at home after logging in.

 

The downfall of this page is that you need to register however it is a great start for teachers looking for significant Indigenous Aboriginals past and present. Once teachers have this, they can expand their knowledge and use these few as a base to expand on. A task on this could involve the teacher leading a discussion after some research from the children on the work of Albert Namatijra or Kath Walker. The children could then, using the work of these two, develop their own artwork and poetry, to be on display in the classroom. The children could also use this work and compare it to the modern day art and poetry, competing on any difference or similarities or even how it would be received in the modern day.

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FTfs - ANZAC Day: Introduction

Curriculum support materials focuses on ANZAC Day: its history, commemorations and ongoing meaning to Australians.
Nicole Cowley's insight:

Every year we celebrate ANZAC day on the 25th April. On this day the country remembers and pays respect to the men and women serving Australia, whether this is presently on peace keeping operations, in wars or conflicts around the world. ANZAC day was originally dedicated to the soldiers (ANZACs – Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) of those in World War I, however over the years this has developed into paying respect to all Australian who have been involved in wars or operations around the world. One of the most significant battles Australians were involved in, in World War I was that at Gallipoli. This battle took place only 13 years after the federation of Australia and so was the first major battle Australia took part in as a nation, in their own right. World War I involved 416 809 Australian solider and of theses 60 000 plus were killed and many more injured. During this war however there a few stand out Australian hero’s, one of these being Simpson and his donkey, who as this site is quoted as exemplifying the ANZAC spirit. This site has links to activities for the students to participate in, one being an activity using the smart board.

 

This site is a useful starting point for a topic on the ANZACs and the impact the battles had on Australia. A useful task in relation to this would be for the children to initially explore what they already know about ANZAC day and the meaning this has for them. Once this established the children would be able to in groups expand on a particular topic related to the significance ANZAC day and the battle at Gallipoli, especially the impact it had on the history of Australia. Incorporating possible family history relating back to World War I. This topic can also cross over with English in having the students write a letter or a diary in the perspective of an ANZAC, or having a visual representation of their findings, this allows a little flexibility in how the students demonstrate their learning.

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chinateach_bk.pdf

Nicole Cowley's insight:

‘China Down Under’ is a multistage curriculum support document for stages 1, 2, and 3. It has handouts, detailed teaching notes and background information for each stage. Each stage has a rich supply of resources and teaching ideas related to the relationship between China and Australia. The pages of particular interest in this booklet are 109-115, where the topic of significant people and events is explored. These pages describe the outcomes the children will attain if using this resource. The booklet has activities related to particular individuals who have made a significant impact on this relationship. The booklet provides detailed activities for children to encounter and how to introduce these in way in which they will understand. One of these tasks in for the students to identify a significant Chinese Australian, the example being Bing Lee. Bing Lee is used as the children should recognise him or is brand of shops. The activity suggests dividing the students into groups and getting them to address a string of questions, dividing the questions among the students. These activities are not the only ones restricted with this booklet. These questions include, but are not limited to:


     How did Bing Lee help others, and
     Why is Bing Lee an important Chinese Australian?


This task can be used as introduction to additional tasks using Chinese Australian; the booklet includes an activity sheet for the student, with other important Chinese Australian and a list of contribution to Australians past. The students then have to match these individually and are then assigned groups allocating jobs and researching one person from this list. These findings can be displayed however the group find most effective.

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The Australian prime minister - Australia's PMs - Australia's Prime Ministers

The Australian prime minister - Australia's PMs - Australia's Prime Ministers | Australians Past and Present | Scoop.it
Nicole Cowley's insight:

In Australia the highest position in parliament is the Prime Minister. This page describes the role of the prime minister in Australia, with links to a page of thumbnails containing all Australia’s past prime minsters and the current, being Julia Gillard. Each of these thumbnails takes you to a page with information on their time before office, during office, and after office, their spouse, time leading up to elections, and other fun facts. This page also has a link to find additional references regarding each prime minister.

 

Children in stage 3 generally have a basic background knowledge of politics, and can possibly identify the current prime minister, however may know any previous prime ministers. As an introductory task the students could be given a list of the past prime minister including their time in office, and have to place along a time line in order form the first (Edmund Barton) to the most recent (Julia Gillard).

 

In further the children would then have to calculate how long each was in office for (incorporating their maths skills) and write a sort description of their contribution to Australian politics. For the more advanced student they could present a detailed description of one particular prime minister, assigned by the teacher, presenting this information in a variety of ways, to be displayed in the classroom. This task could also be adjusted for the children at the opposite end of the spectrum by getting them to produce the timeline and a short, one line, description of the significance of at least 10 prime ministers. This page could also act as an introduction to a topic on Parliament.

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Sporting greats - australia.gov.au

Sporting greats - australia.gov.au | Australians Past and Present | Scoop.it
Nicole Cowley's insight:

Australians are a very sporting society; we pride ourselves on our sporting achievements. As a nation Australia has produced quite a few great sporting hero’s, and still does to this day. This page is apart of the Australian government page and details some of these sporting greats.

 

Children are likely to engage in an activity in which they have an interest. Sporting hero’s is a great starting point for children to explore the achievements of Australians. This page has a link to further information regarding the greats listed on the page, as well as links to other sports in which Australia has produced sport stars and the Australia of the year awards. The sporting achievements of past and present Australia’s can spark a debate as to whether the children in the class have a favourite sporting hero, this can then advance to a discussion as the to the most important in the children’s eyes and having to back up there reasons. The children may also discover new sports, or older sports and this can lead to the children taking part in a round robin of the different sports and creating their own mini Olympics or competition between each other and part of teams. The children with this task would need to be able to perform certain sports and out of their teams nominate the children most suited to each sport, making sure each child got at least one go each.

 

This site also allows the children to have a look at how the Australian of the year is selected and why, incorporating another debate topic or having a mini Australian of the year within the classroom structure.

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