Australian Wildlife Conversation
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The good fight: Part I

Survival is hard enough for furry and lovable endangered animals, let alone the small and unattractive ones. Thankfully, Australia’s small but passionate army of conservationists is here to help.
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-A giant flightless stick insect from the Age of Dinosaurs, the phasmid was believed to have been hunted into oblivion by introduced black rats that, in 1918, reached Lord Howe Island, 780 km north-east of Sydney, by supply ship.

-The zoo now has 700 healthy individuals and, following years of local and international interest, finally feels secure enough about the phasmid’s future to put it on public display.

-But the biggest threat to Australia’s unique biodiversity – and the world’s – is habitat destruction and fragmentation. All our States and territories now have legislation aimed at preventing unauthorised land-clearing and, as a result, terrestrial habitat loss in Australia has slowed.

-The ecological rule of thumb is that when 90 per cent of a habitat is cleared, 50 per cent of its species will be driven to extinction.

-Back on Track gives a species a score using three sets of criteria: their probability of extinction, which is based on IUCN criteria; the consequences of extinction, which allows for the social value of a species and its role in an ecosystem; and the potential for recovery, which assesses the level of effort and resources it will take for species management and protection.

-Most of the losses we’re experiencing here are of global significance because they’re species that are found nowhere else in the world

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Red alert for rare parrot

Red alert for rare parrot | Australian Wildlife Conversation | Scoop.it
Orange-bellied parrots are one of the world's rarest birds. Save them from going belly-up.
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-ORANGE-BELLIED PARROTS ARE one of the world's rarest birds.

-With a wild population of fewer than 50 birds, this iconic Australian parrot is critically endangered.

-However, with their coastal habitat - composed mainly of salt marshes and eucalyptus trees - in both south-east mainland Australia and Tasmania disappearing, these parrots face life in the wild without food or shelter.

-Factors such as predation, spread of disease, loss of genetic variation and severe weather events may also influence their long-term survival.

-They survive due to the enthusiasm of dedicated researchers and volunteers.

-Captive-breeding programs currently monitor about 280 birds, with hopes of releasing them back into the wild soon.

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Rare corroboree frog given second chance

Rare corroboree frog given second chance | Australian Wildlife Conversation | Scoop.it
Scientists are returning hundreds of corroboree frog eggs to the wild in the hope of boosting the population.
Zamzam95's insight:

-ITS STRIKING BLACK-AND-YELLOW mottled colouration makes the corroboree frog stand out, but you'll have a hard time finding these critically

- But now, thanks to an ongoing conservation project, southern corroboree frogs (Pseudophryne corroboree) are getting a second chance.

-Corroboree frog numbers have declined by more than 80 per cent in the last ten years.

-Since 2010, Taronga Zoo, Melbourne Zoo and Healesville Sanctuary joined forces to harvest both wild and captive-bred corroboree frog eggs and place them back it the native frog's habitat in the Snowy Mountains.

-The latest and last batch of 819 eggs will be placed in several re-introduction sites in the national park, which include both chytrid-affected and chytrid-free sites, in an attempt to overcome the impact of the fungus.

- Corroboree frogs can become infected with the chytrid fungus before tadpoles even mature.

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