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SFT-13 | 2013 Successes and Failures in Telehealth - 4th Annual Meeting of the Australasian Telehealth Society - Welcome

SFT-13 | 2013 Successes and Failures in Telehealth - 4th Annual Meeting of the Australasian Telehealth Society - Welcome | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
Successes and Failures in Telehealth - 4th Annual Meeting of the Australasian Telehealth Society, Pullman Brisbane King George Square, Brisbane Australia.
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Twitter / JuliaGillard: A live Telehealth consultation ...

Twitter / JuliaGillard: A live Telehealth consultation ... | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
RT @JuliaGillard: A live Telehealth consultation with Dr Terry Glynn using @Medibank's Anywhere Healthcare. TeamJG http://t.co/Y2b6NYbmyh
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Mayo Clinic to use connected devices in new employee wellness offering | mobihealthnews

Mayo Clinic to use connected devices in new employee wellness offering | mobihealthnews | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
RT @mobilehealth: Mayo Clinic to use connected devices in new employee wellness offering http://t.co/rrUGESvgSa #mHealth #digitalhealth
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Jennifer's Story - How Telemedicine works

Not sure what telemedicine and telehealth mean? Watch "Jennifer's Story." See how telemedicine technology can save money and time while creating happier pati...
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Innovation in Technology-Aided Psychotherapy Through Human Factors/Ergonomics: Toward a Collaborative Approach - Online First - Springer

Innovation in Technology-Aided Psychotherapy Through Human Factors/Ergonomics: Toward a Collaborative Approach - Online First - Springer | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
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The effect of psychosocial interventions delivered by telephone and videophone on quality of life in early-stage breast cancer survivors and their supportive partners

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One year on: update on PCEHR facts and figures

Pulse+IT Magazine - Australasia's First and Only eHealth and Health IT Magazine (RT @LMWeekes: One year on: update on PCEHR facts and figures http://t.co/lBCHOLxvu6)...
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What is person-centred eHealth?

What is person-centred eHealth? | Australian e-health | Scoop.it

What is person-centred eHealth?

 

Does the wording imply that ehealth in general is not person-centred. Well. To elaborate these questions further, I need to make some assumption and define what I mean by person-centred care and eHealth. 

 

Ehealth is according to  Eysenbach et al (2001) ” an emerging field in the intersection of medical informatics, public health and business, referring to health services and information delivered or enhanced through the Internet and related technologies. In a broader sense, the term characterizes not only a technical development, but also a state-of-mind, a way of thinking, an attitude, and a commitment for networked, global thinking, to improve health care locally, regionally, and worldwide by using information and communication technology”.

 

EHealth is not a technical solutions per se, it is also a state of mind and attitude about how we want to communicate and in that sense it could be a good tool in providing support for PCC. 

 

The core in my exposition is grounded on the definition of PCC found within GPCC. I have already discussed this in my previous blogs, and will for the matter of simplicity call it gPCC (Gothenburg person-centred care approach). The most central aspect in gPCC is the mutual acceptance that a person always is intradependent of the other person. At the core of the definition is the concept of partnership.

 

The juridical meaning of the word is that two persons reach an written or verbal agreement (contract) to perform certain commitments. Within the gPCC approach, this agreement would be manifested by a health and care plan that is agreed upon by all involved stakeholders.  So partnership needs at least two people that agree upon a certain approach in order to reach a certain outcomes.

 


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BUP app helps prevent healthcare miscommunication

BUP app helps prevent healthcare miscommunication | Australian e-health | Scoop.it

Miscommunication in a healthcare setting can have dire consequences, and is more likely to occur when clinicians and patients don’t speak the same language. While some healthcare settings have access to interpreters, others often do not.

 

In Botswana, the official language is English, but many Batswana speak only the native language of Setswana. To help prevent healthcare miscommunication in the southern African country, a smartphone medical translation app has been developed for healthcare workers for use on either iPhones or the Android operating system.

 

The app was designed by faculty and staff at the Botswana-UPenn Partnership (BUP), the Biomedical Library and Department of Linguistics at the University of Botswana (UB), the University of Botswana Medical School, the Global Health Programs Office at the Perelman School of Medicine, and DuoChart, an Indianapolis-based company that specializes in translation materials.


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Infographic: See how eHealth aids in home health care

Infographic: See how eHealth aids in home health care | Australian e-health | Scoop.it

In the US, 70 percent of residents over age 65 will need long-term care in their lifetimes. The good news is that eHealth can help in monitoring health conditions. The bad news is that home-based-care staffing and turnover issues jeopardize the care these patients need—things such as help bathing, dressing, eating, using the bathroom.


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eMedToday's curator insight, June 22, 2013 7:39 PM

There a huge over hang of health care needs and costs with the babyboomers. Clearly, mhealth can have a major impact in this area. Hosptials need to organize a support function that connects to the home for the old population

rob halkes's curator insight, July 15, 2013 3:29 PM

..

 

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Healthcare in the home: using technology to deliver care - Pulse+IT Magazine

Healthcare in the home: using technology to deliver care
Pulse+IT Magazine
The use of medical devices in the home and remote monitoring are proven technologies, but the barrier to wider use remains an economic one.
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The futuristic face of health - Perth Now

The futuristic face of health - Perth Now | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
The futuristic face of health
Perth Now
Or if your iPad could connect you to a specialist who could diagnose depression by looking at your facial expressions. You may not need to use your imagination for long.
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How can I use laptops and tablets without suffering from physical pains? - The Guardian

How can I use laptops and tablets without suffering from physical pains? - The Guardian | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
The Guardian
How can I use laptops and tablets without suffering from physical pains?
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7 predictions for the future of health care technology

7 predictions for the future of health care technology | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
My predictions include a meritocracy for doctors, a massive reduction in patient costs, and more.
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The year ahead in eHealth – State budgets analysis | eHealthspace

The year ahead in eHealth – State budgets analysis | eHealthspace | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
The year ahead in eHealth – State budgets analysis | eHealthspace http://t.co/p362Inid0b
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Royal College of General Practitioners: “The 2022 GP: Vision for ...

Royal College of General Practitioners: “The 2022 GP: Vision for ... | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
RCGP A vision for General Practice in the Future NHS. Reading the RCGP's “The 2022 GP: Vision for General Practice in the future NHS” paper and I'm surprised and a little disappointed that there was only one mention of ...
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E-learning & information communication technology (ICT) in nursing education: A review of the literature

E-learning & information communication technology (ICT) in nursing education: A review of the literature | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
To examine primary research articles published between January 2001 and December 2012 that focused on the issues for students and educators involved with E-learning in preregistration nursing programs. The literature was systematically reviewed, critically appraised and thematically analyzed.
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Robot-Guided Exercise Program for the Rehabilitation of Older Nursing Home Residents | Annals of Long Term Care

Robot-Guided Exercise Program for the Rehabilitation of Older Nursing Home Residents | Annals of Long Term Care | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
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Surgeon Uses Google Glass and iPad To Capture Live Procedure and Streams ... - Hot Hardware

Surgeon Uses Google Glass and iPad To Capture Live Procedure and Streams ... - Hot Hardware | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
Surgeon Uses Google Glass and iPad To Capture Live Procedure and Streams ...
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Dr. iPhone: How Will the Smartphone Physical Change Healthcare?

Dr. iPhone: How Will the Smartphone Physical Change Healthcare? | Australian e-health | Scoop.it

Mobile health applications represent the next stage of patient empowerment. 30 years ago, patients received information and procedures from their physicians, often without instruction. Now, the smartphone physical empowers patients to identify, understand, and manage their own health on a completely new level. This offers critical implications for the future of medicine:

 

1. Patient Engagement: It’s probable that the physical act of regularly checking blood pressure or measuring blood sugar levels can make a patient more conscious about their health. It’s also hopeful that such self-tracking can inspire self-education and positive behavior change. This is difficult to measure experimentally (have you ever noticed that the most avid quantified self-ers are the fittest and healthiest people?) but it offers reason to be optimistic about mHealth.

 

2. Remote Care: A critical challenge of hospital readmissions is that, once the patient walks out the door, it’s no easy endeavor to reconnect with them. If physicians could remotely monitor patients, it’s possible they could identify early signs of a complication and intervene. As a readmissions researcher, I’ve spoken with patients who waited for three weeks of not being able to eat before returning to the hospital 30 pounds lighter. The smartphone physical could have flagged that—and someday, it will.

 

3. The Doctor’s Role: This is the big question, and it’s a loaded one. How will physicians interpret and process the information overload that follows such complete self-quantification? How will electronic health records and/or personal health records adapt to meaningfully consolidate, analyze, and present all this data? How does the patient’s ability to self-educate, self-diagnose, and (perhaps eventually) self-treat change the purpose and significance of the doctor-patient relationship? At Millennial Medicine, Dr. Eric Topol presented these mHealth innovations and said, “With this, why would you want to go to the hospital?” Good question — Will patients still want, or need, to interact with their doctors?

 

These are ambitious goals, but with the advances I’ve seen in this video as well as other seminal achievements made in mHealth and digital medicine recently, I’m optimistic that they are all entirely doable. I’m also conscious of how often I’ve used the word “possible” in this reflection and how scarcely I’ve said “proven.” It simply speaks to the fact that we’re faced with inspiring technical capabilities that offer tremendous hope; the challenge now falls to tomorrow’s physicians and scholars to innovate, research, and troubleshoot to bring these ambitions to realization.

 

 


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5 ways robots are invading -- and improving -- hospitals

5 ways robots are invading -- and improving -- hospitals | Australian e-health | Scoop.it

While hospital robots sound like the stuff of the future, the technology is already in wide use today.

 

If you’ve been waiting for the day when robot doctors will cut you open, monitor you recovery, and keep you company in your hospital room, you won’t have to wait much longer.

 

“We’re in the first inning of a nine-inning exercise. The average patient walks in a hospital and is not touched by robotics. That’s going to change in 10 years,” said John Simon, a partner at Boston-based investment firm Sigma Prime Ventures.

 

That adoption rate, Simon argues, is based on cost: As the price of robotics adoption decreases, hospitals may be more likely to invest in new technology. At their core, robots aren’t all that different from any other hospital gear.

 

The problem for hospitals, however, is that there’s a danger in pursuing robotics too far. “With medical robots,  if you automate something too much, people won’t accept it,” Simon said.

 

This results in a fine line that hospitals and doctors must manage. While some automation and robotics is good, the last thing a hospital wants to do is embrace robots to such an extent that they alienate patients.

 

Little of that, however, is on the minds of hospitals today. Right now, most of them are just trying to figure out how to get robots in the front door. Here are a few ways robots are changing hospitals today.


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Cynthia Tait's curator insight, May 21, 2013 6:24 PM

look out - Assimov time is here

cameron scott's curator insight, March 25, 2015 6:29 AM

This article shows us how the innovation  on new robotics technology can be utilized in medicine to assist doctors with their work. The possibilities are endless and using robotics to this degree will take a long time for it to be implemented, since it has to do with patient safety.

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Sending out an SOS by watch phone for the elderly

Sending out an SOS by watch phone for the elderly | Australian e-health | Scoop.it

Sydney-based personal care technology company mCareWatch has released a mobile personal device for the elderly that is part wristwatch, part mobile phone, part emergency beacon.

 

Aimed at the elderly living in their own homes as well as the independent living and residential aged care sectors, the SOS Mobile Watch looks like and actually is a watch, but it also functions as a mobile phone, a GPS tracking device and a medical alert system.

 

mCareWatch is a new company founded by Australian brothers Peter Apostolopoulos and Paul Apostolis, which specialises in using technology to support carers, the elderly and chronically ill. The SOS Mobile Watch is the company's first product and has been in development over the last two years.

 

Mr Apostolopoulos has a long history in health IT, having worked for NSW

Health and Queensland Health before heading to Singapore to work for telecommunications giant SingTel, while his brother – who changed the spelling of his surname many years ago – is a sales and marketing specialist.

 

Mr Apostolopoulos said that in addition to his background in health IT and eHealth, there was a personal reason for setting up the new company and aiming at the assisted living and personal care market.


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Michael Stuart's curator insight, June 20, 2013 10:41 AM

mCareWatch is a new company founded by Australian brothers Peter Apostolopoulos and Paul Apostolis, which specialises in using technology to support carers, the elderly and chronically ill. The SOS Mobile Watch is the company's first product and has been in development over the last two years.

 

Mr Apostolopoulos said that in addition to his background in health IT and eHealth, there was a personal reason for setting up the new company and aiming at the assisted living and personal care market.

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Informed consent central to telehealth, poses challenges - FierceHealthIT

Informed consent central to telehealth, poses challenges - FierceHealthIT | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
Informed consent central to telehealth, poses challenges FierceHealthIT The very nature of telehealth--the use of technology across distance to provide healthcare services--can increase the risk associated with even routine treatments.
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eHealthNews.eu - The First European eHealth News Portal.

eHealthNews.eu - The First European eHealth News Portal. | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
eHealthNews.eu - The First European eHealth News Portal.
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Mobile Health Apps Neglect Poor Countries - InformationWeek SMB (blog)

Mobile Health Apps Neglect Poor Countries - InformationWeek SMB (blog) | Australian e-health | Scoop.it
Mobile Health Apps Neglect Poor Countries
InformationWeek SMB (blog)
Altogether, chronic disease apps form only a small subset of the mobile health apps available today.
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