Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think
275 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

Flipping Bloom's Taxonomy

Flipping Bloom's Taxonomy | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it

I think the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy is wrong. I agree that the taxonomy accurately classifies various types of cognitive thinking skills. It certainly identifies the different levels of complexity.

Marianne's insight:

Love this!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

A Detailed List of 9 Self Assessment Questions for a Growth Mindset

A Detailed List of 9 Self Assessment Questions for a Growth Mindset | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Here are some great self assessment questions that are based on an infographic that features a list of growth mindset principles.
Marianne's insight:

Strong connections here to the critical and creative thinking capability.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

Three Tools for Teaching Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

Three Tools for Teaching Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Teaching students how to make inferences and see positive sides of even terrible ideas can help them develop critical thinking skills.
Marianne's insight:

This article contains some very practical  and easy to implement ideas.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

The Critical 21st Century Skills Every Student Needs and Why

The Critical 21st Century Skills Every Student Needs and Why | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
This is a re-share of one of our most popular articles on the 21st century skills students need for life beyond the classroom, and why they are important.
Marianne's insight:

Strong links to our Australian Curriculum capabilities - they exist for a reason!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning - TeachThought

8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning - TeachThought | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Why the brain actually benefits from reflection is a matter of neurology, but the extensive research is clear: Prediction, reflection, and metacognition are pillars for the thoughtful classroom. The questions below were created to be, as much as possible, useful with most students at most ages and grade levels with a little rewording.

Perhaps most crucially, by shifting their reflection from content to thought, students have the chance to put themselves back at the center of the learning process. When they reflect, students reimagine what happened in both 1st and 3rd person–as they were seen, and as they saw through their own eyes. How? A sample response for a 7th or 8th grader might be:

I guess I was most creative today when we were given a chance to create our own metaphors for the ways rain forests help the planet “breathe.” Why? Maybe because it forced me to think about something visually, which meant we could come up with our own answers! 

In reflecting, the student had to think both about their own feelings (when they felt something), and how they might be perceived (what others might consider ‘creative’).

Via John Evans
more...
Helen Teague's curator insight, September 24, 8:14 AM
great scoop on the importance and power of reflection
Victor Ventura's curator insight, September 24, 8:55 AM
Prediction, Reflection, and Metacognition. We can make this a regular practice in any grade level classroom. These questions and others can provide the pathway.
Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

How Self-Directed Learning Can Benefit Every Student

How Self-Directed Learning Can Benefit Every Student | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it

Students teaching themselves? Who ever heard of this? Is this even possible? What exactly do we mean by self-directed learning, anyway? I love the following definition from Blake Boles.


What it isn’t:


“isolated, unstructured, or unchallenging learning.”


“classrooms and teachers as the root of all evil.”


What it is:


“purposefully choosing what and how you’ll learn.”


“an understanding and embrace of your personal learning style.”


“all types of learning—including highly structured learning—are valid when you consciously choose them.”



Via John Evans
more...
David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 15, 6:41 PM

Good stuff! Thanks to Juan Doming.

Victor Ventura's curator insight, August 16, 9:41 AM
My 1st thought was regarding teachers-how they should focus on self-directed learing to refine or explore their skills. Who is in a better position to make decisions about their PD than the teacher herself/himself. The improving teacher is rewarded as well as their students. The best teachers are life long learners and are not governed by school or district expectations or contracts. 
Victor Ventura's curator insight, August 20, 1:14 PM
I am going to see if there are any connections between this article and "Learn Like a Pirate" which I just started reading. There is immense value to self directed learning and hopefully, once ingrained, should be a life long habit.
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students

27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

100 Questions That Help Students Think About Thinking - TeachThought

100 Questions That Help Students Think About Thinking - TeachThought | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
100 Questions That Help Students Think About Thinking by Terry Heick Last year I wrote a post on how to help students think for themselves

Via John Evans
more...
krishn store's curator insight, April 12, 10:20 PM
view Krishna store online India http://krishnstore.com
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges

When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
By identifying thinking routines for students, teachers can help deepen metacognitive skills that are applicable to all areas of life.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

Coverage Teaching Is A Kind Of Blindness -

Coverage Teaching Is A Kind Of Blindness - | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Coverage Teaching Is A Kind Of Blindness by Grant Wiggins Ed note: We’re continuing to go back and share some of Grant’s best and most useful posts. This one on the implementation of Essential Questions is useful even if you’re “doing” UbD due to its emphasis on inquiry. The Essential Question as Anchor [...]
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marianne from Education 2.0 & 3.0
Scoop.it!

A Diagram Of 21st Century Pedagogy

A Diagram Of 21st Century Pedagogy | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
A Diagram Of 21st Century Pedagogy by TeachThought Staff The modern learner has to sift through a lot of information. That means higher level thinking skills like analysis and evaluation...

Via Yashy Tohsaku
more...
Joe McDonough's curator insight, February 5, 5:11 PM

I'd like to see "Ethics" listed... maybe on the "Encouraging reflection" vector.

Susan Wegmann's curator insight, April 22, 12:21 PM
Professional Development ideas
Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 6:08 AM
Another GREAT visual map of 21st Century Pedagogy....Definitely helps me put things into perspective !! :) 
Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

Why It’s Imperative to Teach Students How to Question as the Ultimate Survival Skill

Why It’s Imperative to Teach Students How to Question as the Ultimate Survival Skill | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Are our schools doing a good job of preparing students for a world where questioning is a survival skill?

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

20 Classroom Setups That Promote Thinking

20 Classroom Setups That Promote Thinking | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
This is part 1 in our #iteachthought campaign. This is our equivalent to “back to school,” and is intended to help you focus in the 2015-2016 school year on taking a thoughtful approach to your craft as a teacher. Among these shifts we’ll talk about is turning our focus from content and teaching to thinkers and thinking. This is a student-centered approach to pedagogy (and heautagogy), and will consist of four parts:

Part 1: Classroom Setups That Promote Thinking

Part 2: Learning Profiles: What Great Teachers Know About Their Students

Part 3: 50 Questions To Ask Your Students On The First Day Of School

Part 4: Getting The Best Work From Your Students

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marianne from Educational Technology and Mobile Lerarning
Scoop.it!

An Awesome Infographic on Bloom's Digital Taxonomy

An Awesome Infographic on Bloom's Digital Taxonomy | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Via Educatorstechnology
more...
OFFREDI Didier's curator insight, December 1, 6:18 AM

An Awesome Infographic on Bloom's Digital Taxonomy via @MarkEDeschaine http://sco.lt/...

Kim Flintoff's comment, December 2, 6:33 PM
This model is too simplistic - it really needs some HOTS applied to it - along these lines: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/94/ac/42/94ac420bab0bd20900e8c34d6d8289ae.png
Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

10 ways to make learning meaningful… @whatedsaid

10 ways to make learning meaningful… @whatedsaid | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Whether your students are completing assignments, inquiring into areas of their interest, covering curriculum or exploring their passions, to what extent does it feel (to you, as much as to them) as if they are simply complying and ‘doing school’?

How can we extend learning ‘beyond the project’ and ensure it’s a powerful learning experience, rather than a task for school? (Hint: the answer does not lie in assessment criteria, rubrics or grades.)

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

22 Powerful Closure Activities

22 Powerful Closure Activities | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Closure ends a lesson and creates a lasting impression, so make it fun. Students will better retain information reinforced with music, movement, art, or play.
Marianne's insight:

Some useful ones here that will invite rich thinking...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

How Clear Expectations Can Inhibit Genuine Thinking in Students

How Clear Expectations Can Inhibit Genuine Thinking in Students | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Outlining exactly what students need to know to get a good grade can get in the way of genuine learning.
Marianne's insight:

Love the five belief sets that can either invite thinking or inhibit it...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

TfEL Think Cards

Learning Design Tab

Marianne's insight:

These Think Cards are great quick ways to build thinking skills

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

10+ Terrific Resources for Teaching Questioning Skills to Your Students

10+ Terrific Resources for Teaching Questioning Skills to Your Students | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
A list of useful resources to help you develop questioning skills in your students in fun and challenging ways.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Marianne
Scoop.it!

Student Engagement: Is It Authentic or Compliant?

Student Engagement: Is It Authentic or Compliant? | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Student engagement is extremely important in our classrooms, but too often the engagement is compliant rather than authentic.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

Adding Depth to the Classroom

Adding Depth to the Classroom | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
San Diego’s High Tech High network practices “deeper learning,” an educational approach with a growing following. Advocates say deeper learning improves equity in and outside the classroom. Using students’ experiences and backgrounds as a springboard, the system engages kids—particularly those who fall through the cracks in traditional schools—and prepares them for success after graduation.

Deeper learning seeks to cultivate the critical-thinking skills and creativity demanded in the real world. Companies like Google have declared test scores “worthless.” Leading colleges and universities, too, are on track to replace standard applications with portfolios that give a fuller picture of a student’s achievements in high school. They are looking for candidates who have more to offer than textbook knowledge.

Via John Evans
more...
krishn store's curator insight, April 12, 10:19 PM
Krishna store online India http://krishnstore.com/
Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

Nurturing Growth Mindsets: Six Tips From Carol Dweck

Nurturing Growth Mindsets: Six Tips From Carol Dweck | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Stanford researcher Carol Dweck clearly tapped into a powerful and compelling idea when she linked the concept of growth mindsets to academic success.

As fans of Dweck's research can quickly explain, people with fixed mindsets see strengths and skills as inate traits, like eye color. You're either born with them, or you're not. But people with growth mindsets recognize that the brain can grow and change through effort, and they embrace failures as opportunities for developing new strategies and approaches to learning content and concepts they find challenging.

Enthusiasm for Dweck's work has spread rapidly, and her name is a buzzword in many schools as teachers buy into the idea that helping students shift their mindsets can lead to academic gains.

Via John Evans
more...
emma's curator insight, March 16, 12:54 PM
Some very practical tips on implementing growth mindset, it's not a silver bullet but it is pure gold...
Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies - Cult of Pedagogy

The Big List of Class Discussion Strategies - Cult of Pedagogy | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
When I worked with student teachers on developing effective lesson plans, one thing I always asked them to revise was the phrase “We will discuss.”

We will discuss the video.

We will discuss the story.

We will discuss our results.

Every time I saw it in a lesson plan, I would add a  note: “What format will you use? What questions will you ask? How will you ensure that all students participate?” I was pretty sure that We will discuss actually meant the teacher would do most of the talking; He would throw out a couple of questions like “So what did you think about the video?” or “What was the theme of the story?” and a few students would respond, resulting in something that looked  like a discussion, but was ultimately just a conversation between the teacher and a handful of extroverted students; a classic case of Fisheye Teaching.

The problem wasn’t them; in most of the classrooms where they’d sat as students, that’s exactly what a class discussion looked like. They didn’t know any other “formats.” I have only ever been familiar with a few myself. But when teachers began contacting me recently asking for a more comprehensive list, I knew it was time to do some serious research.

Via John Evans
more...
Victor Ventura's curator insight, February 22, 12:57 PM

Discussion is required for learning in every level of classrooms. This article offers both  high level planning and low level planning. Well worth the time to read this.

Susan Wegmann's curator insight, April 22, 12:20 PM
Genuine class discussions -- singing my song!
Ainsley Ballinger's curator insight, May 2, 12:02 AM

Great ideas to promote in-class discussion. Will be referring to when creating lesson plans for my placement. 

Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

12 Strategies For Creating An Atmosphere Of Problem-Solving In Your Classroom

12 Strategies For Creating An Atmosphere Of Problem-Solving In Your Classroom | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Marianne from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

The Power Of I Don’t Know - TeachThought

The Power Of I Don’t Know - TeachThought | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
A driving strategy that serves students–whether pursuing self-knowledge or academic content–is questioning. Questioning is useful as an assessment strategy, catalyst for inquiry, or “getting unstuck” tool. It can drive entire unit of instruction as an essential question. In other words, questions transcend content, floating somewhere between the students and their context.

Questions are more important than the answers they seem designed to elicit. The answer is residual–requires the student to package their content to please the question-maker, which moves the center of gravity from the student’s belly to the educator’s marking pen. In that light, I was interested when I found the visual above.

It’s okay to say “I don’t know.” Teach your students how to develop questions (because) it helps conquer their own confusion.

Rebeca Zuniga was inspired to create the above visual by the wonderful Heather Wolpert-Gawron (from the equally wonderful edutopia, and also her own site, tweenteacher). The whole graphic is wonderful, but it’s that I don’t know that really resonated with me. Traditionally, this phrase is seen as a hole rather than a hill. I don’t know means I’m missing information that I’m supposed to have.

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.