australian contact history
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Fleet that took first footsteps into new land - Whitby Gazette

Fleet that took first footsteps into new land - Whitby Gazette | australian contact history | Scoop.it
Just 18 years after Captain Cook charted the country's east coast, 11 vessels made the perilous journey to establish Australia's first colony.

Via lucas hodge, Taine Barker
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lucas hodge's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:43 PM

This is information that is about when Captain Cook andhis ships first placed their feet on Australian earth

Taine Barker's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:48 PM

This is a massive moment in history as these were the first Ships to land on the Australian borders (from what we know).

 

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DNA confirms Aboriginal culture one of Earth's oldest

DNA confirms Aboriginal culture one of Earth's oldest | australian contact history | Scoop.it
The first Aboriginal genome sequence confirms Australia's native people left Africa 75,000 years ago.

Via Dawn Hawthorn-Jackson, Shannon Pulver, Taine Barker, Lachlan Wilks
cy.osaki's insight:

it tells how aboriginals culture is one of the oldest

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gemima pearson's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:33 PM

Aborignal Australians are one of the longest lasting culture on earth!

Lachlan Wilks's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:57 PM

I never knew that Australia had one one of the Earth's oldest cultures. Very, very interesting as they left Africa over 75,000 years ago!

Taine Barker's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:59 PM

This is our first blood that we know of, that6 brought aboriginal culture alive.

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Ancient Australian History

Ancient Australian History | australian contact history | Scoop.it

Via Heather Munro
cy.osaki's insight:

this site tells you about the different times of australia

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Elizabeth Woodhouse's comment, April 1, 2013 9:48 PM
This is very interesting! :)
Heather Munro's curator insight, April 22, 2013 3:53 AM

This website is a resource that could be used by students in the classroom independently or in pairs. This website covers the Colonisation of Australia to Federation (1788-1900) that this subject matter is purely interested in. It does also cover Australia before colonisation and post Federation. Colonisation has been split into seven different categories, which detail different events and consequences, such as the Australian Explorers; who moved away from the safety of the shoreline to map out Australia, the Goldrush and Bushrangers. This resource meets the required subject matter, better in some aspects than others, for example the category of Early Years, where significant people such as Governor Arthur Phillip, John Macarthur and Lachlan Macquarie can be found in detail. This website should be used in conjunction with an Indigenous source when teaching about the Colonisation because it lacks the Indigenous perspective which is an essential element to teaching this subject matter, as the Indigenous community were devastated by Colonisation. This website should also be used with another resource that provides an insight to the life of free settlers, as it only offers the perspective of convicts and doesn’t acknowledge other groups who moved over to Australia in the early years for other reasons.

 

The purpose of allowing students to work independently from the teacher on this website is to engage them in the development of their literacy and research skills whilst using ICT. To direct and maintain students’ engagement on task, meaningful and effective activities should be developed in order to prevent students from merely skimming the information to retrieve answers to the activities that the website has to offer. De Bono's Six Thinking Hats (The Opportunity Thinker, 2013) can be used by students to analyse the specific information provided by this website, such as the convicts section. The students will use all of the hats to comment on the treatment and wellbeing of the convicts, to sympathise and challenge the ideals held at the time; to have a better understanding of the tensions that came with Australia being settled by convicts forced into transportation.

 

If teachers use this website appropriately and in consultation with other resources, it can have great potential with students in broadening their knowledge on the Colonisation of Australia as well as build their self-confidence on researching and retrieving answers from the internet independently.

ZOE MILLER's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:58 PM

this site is good for knowing about different times in autralian history

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Year 4 First Fleet & Convicts in Australia

Year 4 First Fleet & Convicts in Australia | australian contact history | Scoop.it
For the first few decades of life in Australia, most of the inhabitants were either convicts, or the troops who had brought them here.

Via Maree Whiteley
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Convicts came to Australia in 1788, on the First Fleet.

Many of the convicts were sentenced to deportation for minor crimes as life became very tough in Great Britain.

In the first few decades convicts formed a large percentage of the Australian population.

Governor Lachlan Macquarie encouraged reformed convicts to  participate in society.

Many of Australia's early public works were completed by convict labour.

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lucas hodge's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:59 PM

This is all about the convicts that inhabited Australia and did hard larbour for example build farms, houses and roads etc

Cassidy Graham's curator insight, November 10, 2013 6:02 PM

convicts arrived in australia in 1788, on the first fleet,this article tells you about the first fleet and what happened to onvicts.

Erin Behn's curator insight, November 10, 2013 6:04 PM

Some key points about the First Fleet.

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Convict women in Port Jackson - australia.gov.au

Convict women in Port Jackson - australia.gov.au | australian contact history | Scoop.it

Via LizKelly, ZOE MILLER
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IT TELLS YOU ABOUT THE CONVICT WOMEN

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LizKelly's curator insight, March 26, 2013 11:30 PM

Good general site on Convict women

ZOE MILLER's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:32 PM

http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/convict-women-in-port-jackson ; this is another trustworthy site about convicts

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Journals of the First Fleet | State Library of New South Wales

Journals of the First Fleet | State Library of New South Wales | australian contact history | Scoop.it

Explore our incredible stories online through a unique selection of digitised items from the Library's vast collections, including books, journals, letters, pictures, photos, plans, maps and ephemera


Via Maree Whiteley, teigan cotterill, Lachlan Wilks
cy.osaki's insight:

this sight is useful because it has the journals of the first fleet

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Lachlan Wilks's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:52 PM

Here's some map, letter, plans and journals from the First Fleet!

layne peebles's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:55 PM

there were many different methods that they used to get here. some of them include maps photos and books.

Erin Behn's curator insight, November 10, 2013 6:06 PM

Diarys' and Pictures made by convicts. in 1788 and beyond.

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Aboriginal history timeline (1770 - 1899) - Creative Spirits

Aboriginal history timeline (1770 - 1899) - Creative Spirits | australian contact history | Scoop.it
 

Via Heather Munro
cy.osaki's insight:

This site is useful because it gives you a timeline with the dates

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Heather Munro's curator insight, April 22, 2013 3:35 AM

This is an Indigenous Australian resource and provides a timeline of events that occurred throughout 1770-1899 from the Indigenous perspective. In the society we live in, we cannot deny the devastating effect that the arrival and establishment of a British colony, has been detrimental to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. This subject matter doesn’t explicitly mention the Aboriginal community, as it is accounted for in following subject matter (Board of Studies, 1998), however, many events that occurred following the establishment of a British colony are due to the inability for the settlers to live alongside and understand the Aboriginal community, and hostile interaction was often the end result. 

 

It is hard to understand what really unfolded between the Aboriginal community and the British settlers unless one seeks out Indigenous sources to view, in conjunction with the readily available British primary sources. It is easier to say there was conflict between these two groups and move on to the next part of the syllabus, but to understand the issues that currently affect Australia today and therefore have a better understanding, we have to seek out the past from which the present stems from, and learn from it.

When teaching about the establishment of a British colony, we should be using the “interpretation and evaluation of diverse forms of evidence and the appreciation of conflicting accounts of the past and differences in historical interpretation as key elements” (Cavanagh, p.55, 2011). There were two distinct cultural groups present at colonisation, both have their own perspective of events that unfolded and therefore this act of teaching shared history should be used to provide students with a significantly better education then if taught otherwise.

 

This resource serves the purpose of introducing the students to a different perspective on the establishment of a British colony, where they look at the events that were recorded by the Indigenous community, shedding light on the true extent of conflict that occurred between these two groups.