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UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

For information on Australian Human Rights Commission resources on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, see http://www.humanrights.gov.au/...
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26 May: National Sorry Day ~ "From Little Things Big Things Grow" (The GetUp Mob! )

"...'sorry' is only the 1st step towards Indigenous equality."

John Howard Apology (The Games) http://youtu.be/Dh0MNIFezME
Kevin Rudd Apology (13 February 2008) http://youtu.be/b3TZOGpG6cM
"Sorry" (Karine Polwart) 10 March 2008 http://youtu.be/3syd8kF2fVI

 

National Sorry Day is an annual event that has been held in Australia on 26 May, since 1998, to remember and commemorate the mistreatment of the continent's indigenous population. The Australian government's most controversial policies resulted in an entire "Stolen Generation"—i.e., "Aboriginal children separated, often forcibly, from their families of origin in the interest of turning them into white Australians".

 

26 May carries great significance for the Stolen Generations, as well as for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and non-indigenous Australians. On 26 May 1997, the "Bringing Them Home" report was tabled in Parliament.

 

The annual National Sorry Day commemorations remind and raise awareness among politicians, policy makers, and the wider public about the significance of the forcible removal policies and their impact on the children that were taken, but also on their families and communities. __ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Day_of_Healing

 

__ http://www.nsdc.org.au/
__ http://www.sgalliance.org.au/
__ http://stolengenerationstestimonies.com/
__ http://www.healingfoundation.org.au/
__ http://www.reconciliation.org.au/
__ http://www.kimberleystolengeneration.com.au/

__ http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/sorry-day-stolen-generations

 

"Almost half of the Aboriginal people who died in custody and were investigated by the Black Deaths Royal Commission, had been removed from their families as children..." - Kirsten Garrett, Background Briefing, Sunday, 11 February 1996

"They would not let us kiss our father goodbye, I will never forget the sad look on his face. He was unwell and he worked very hard all his life as a timber-cutter. That was the last time I saw my father, he died within two years after." - Jennifer, Bringing them Home - Full report

We, the 24,763 undersigned people of Australia, believe an apology is owed to those of our fellow citizens who were separated from their families as a direct result of government policy... We offer that apology.

Reconciliation Activities and Events Last updated:18 May 2002
__ http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/10736/20050711-0000/apology.west.net.au/index.html


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Bringing them home: The 'Stolen Children' report (1997) | Australian Human Rights Commission

Bringing them home: The 'Stolen Children' report (1997) | Australian Human Rights Commission | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it
SUMMARY: Resources for Bringing them home: The 'Stolen Children' report (1997)

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The 1967 Referendum: the people’s movement · Marnti Warajanga— a walk together

The 1967 Referendum: the people’s movement · Marnti Warajanga— a walk together | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it

This website is produced in consultation with Wangka Maya Pilbara Aboriginal Language centre.


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Australia's 1967 Referendum

Australia's 1967 Referendum | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Why have the results of the 1967 Referendum had a lasting symbolic significance? Civil rights activist Faith Bandler...

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Molly Rose 's curator insight, March 26, 2014 7:27 PM

Australia’s 1967 Referendum

‘Australia’s 1967 referendum’ is a great resource to use in a Stage 3 primary classroom and should be used after first looking at democracy in Australia. This resource provides students with insight into the exclusion of Aboriginal peoples in democratic Australia. This resource provides students with an example “of events and issues that have influenced democratic practices in Australia…” while also examining “examples of exclusion from citizenship, both past and present, and the effect of this exclusion, including the effects of government policies on Aboriginal peoples” (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p. 25). ‘Australia’s 1967 referendum’ provides students with detailed descriptions of both national and local events and any issues, problems and trends encountered.

Before viewing the Splash ABC resource, discuss with students if they know what a referendum is.
During the video, use some of the ‘things to think about’ on the webpage to engage the students and keep them on track;
- Discuss if they think the white Anglo Saxons in Australia encountered the same issues.
- Ask how long the rallying went on for
- How many signatures they had to have and how many they got
- Why did they have to be persistent and present a petition everyday?

After viewing discuss how issues touched on in the clip influenced democratic practices.
- Discuss why the referendum was a democratic practice.
- Discuss if the referendum was successful and ideas why it was so successful.
- Discuss, why the referendum was vital.
- Discuss what they think the general population thought about Aboriginal people at this time. Write key words on the board for students.

Replay the video again for students so that they can link the discussions back to the clip.

Students will write an informative text in the form of a newspaper article set either before or after the 1967 referendum, or an informative poster about the referendum. Students will have a choice between the literacy activities they undertake. Students in stage 3 will use their prior knowledge and experiment “with text structures, language features, images and digital resources appropriate to purpose and audience (ACELY1714)” (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2014). Students must include the notion of democracy, Australia as a democracy and/or democratic practices.

Teachers can use this resource in the stage 3 classrooms to address the impact that democratic practices in Australia had on the inclusion of Aboriginal people into society. This resource provides students with insight into the issues and problems faced by Aboriginal people, while also recognising and examining “events and issues that have influenced democratic practices in Australia” (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p. 25). Furthermore, this resource allows students in stage 3 to take a critical approach to understanding democracy, as they are able to see the change in treatment and policies towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, due to democratic events such as the referendum.

This resource is fantastic to integrate into the classroom as it gives students the “power to judge things for themselves, and not be led unthinkingly by the views of others” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 12). The Splash ABC resource allows the students of stage 3 to understand local and national issues that surrounded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and how democratic practices were put in place to overcome barriers of exclusion.

References:

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2014). English Curriculum. Retrieved 12 March, 2014 from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/english/Curriculum/F-10#level1


Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved 12 March, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/93e2f966-0629-492b-9ae6-4a3b052edf98/k6_hsie_syl.pdf?MOD=AJPERES


Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

Molly Rose's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:53 AM

Australia’s 1967 referendum’ is a great resource to use in a Stage 3 primary classroom and should be used after first looking at democracy in Australia. This resource provides students with insight into the exclusion of Aboriginal peoples in democratic Australia. This resource provides students with an example “of events and issues that have influenced democratic practices in Australia…” while also examining “examples of exclusion from citizenship, both past and present, and the effect of this exclusion, including the effects of government policies on Aboriginal peoples” (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p. 25). ‘Australia’s 1967 referendum’ provides students with detailed descriptions of both national and local events and any issues, problems and trends encountered.

Before viewing the Splash ABC resource, discuss with students if they know what a referendum is.
During the video, use some of the ‘things to think about’ on the webpage to engage the students and keep them on track;
- Discuss if they think the white Anglo Saxons in Australia encountered the same issues.
- Ask how long the rallying went on for
- How many signatures they had to have and how many they got
- Why did they have to be persistent and present a petition everyday?

After viewing discuss how issues touched on in the clip influenced democratic practices.
- Discuss why the referendum was a democratic practice.
- Discuss if the referendum was successful and ideas why it was so successful.
- Discuss, why the referendum was vital.
- Discuss what they think the general population thought about Aboriginal people at this time. Write key words on the board for students.

Replay the video again for students so that they can link the discussions back to the clip.

Students will write an informative text in the form of a newspaper article set either before or after the 1967 referendum, or an informative poster about the referendum. Students will have a choice between the literacy activities they undertake. Students in stage 3 will use their prior knowledge and experiment “with text structures, language features, images and digital resources appropriate to purpose and audience (ACELY1714)” (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2014). Students must include the notion of democracy, Australia as a democracy and/or democratic practices.

Teachers can use this resource in the stage 3 classrooms to address the impact that democratic practices in Australia had on the inclusion of Aboriginal people into society. This resource provides students with insight into the issues and problems faced by Aboriginal people, while also recognising and examining “events and issues that have influenced democratic practices in Australia” (NSW Board of Studies, 2006, p. 25). Furthermore, this resource allows students in stage 3 to take a critical approach to understanding democracy, as they are able to see the change in treatment and policies towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, due to democratic events such as the referendum.

This resource is fantastic to integrate into the classroom as it gives students the “power to judge things for themselves, and not be led unthinkingly by the views of others” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 12). The Splash ABC resource allows the students of stage 3 to understand local and national issues that surrounded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and how democratic practices were put in place to overcome barriers of exclusion.

References:

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2014). English Curriculum. Retrieved 12 March, 2014 from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/english/Curriculum/F-10#level1


Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved 12 March, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/93e2f966-0629-492b-9ae6-4a3b052edf98/k6_hsie_syl.pdf?MOD=AJPERES


Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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YES! the 1967 Referendum - Newspapers, p4

YES! the 1967 Referendum - Newspapers, p4 | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it

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Jemima Durmanich's curator insight, September 25, 2013 11:50 PM

This website has many interesting newspaper articles from 1967 about the Indigenous Australians

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Barlett, Richard --- "Wik: Equity and the Fallacy of 'Extinguishment'"

Barlett, Richard --- "Wik: Equity and the Fallacy of 'Extinguishment'" | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it

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DJ Welsh's curator insight, May 14, 2013 9:23 PM

From the Indigenous Law Bulletin.

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Native title - Creative Spirits

Native title - Creative Spirits | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Learn what native title is and which historic events shaped the modern Aboriginal people’s relationship to their traditional lands.

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Indigenous, Media, Public Ideas – Some Shifts in Anti-Land Rights Campaigns after Mabo: Including the 'They' Community

Some Shifts in Anti-Land Rights Campaigns after Mabo: including the 'they' community

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Mabo/Mabo - The Native Title Revolution

Mabo/Mabo - The Native Title Revolution | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Mabo - The Native Title Revolution

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Self-determination - First Australians

The First Australians protest and take battles to court - one case will bring recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ownership of land for the ...
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RightsED: Bringing them home

RightsED: Bringing them home | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it

The resources on this site have been developed in response to requests from teachers for information about the report 'Bringing them home: National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families'. There are a variety of worksheets that can be used in either the classroom or in the community.

 


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Anne Tumak's curator insight, August 10, 2015 11:39 PM

Can get a copy of the report here

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Differing perspectives: Australia Day / Invasion Day

Differing perspectives: Australia Day / Invasion Day | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it

“ Most Australians celebrate Australia Day as the day Australia was founded. In contrast, Aboriginal people mourn their history and call it ‘Invasion Day’.”


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Adele Turnbull's curator insight, April 6, 2015 12:48 AM

This article outlines the particular significance of Survival Day for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and communities, and links this back to the origins of the day. It includes poems, quotes, recounts and learning activities, and references to alternative commemorative ceremonies such as the Yabun Festival in Sydney.

 

The article is up-to-date, balanced, written in accessible language and respectful. It acknowledges that individual's experiences are different, and so different areas and communities commemorate Survival Day in different ways. It quotes directly and extensively from Aboriginal individuals, and so details authentic perspectives. As a result, the article is appropriate for use in a stage 3 classroom (Craven, ND), though care should be taken not to generalise based off the content provided.

 

This article provides an excellent platform for reaching out to a school's local Aboriginal community. Teachers and students could invite local community members to speak about their perspectives on Survival Day, and what they do to commemorate it. This would help students to discuss and respect the cross-curriculum priority of "Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures" (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 7) in regards to the origin and significance of Australia Day/Survival Day, and have the added benefit of tethering students' learning to their local context in order to aid comprehension and relevance (Brophy & Alleman, 2009, p. 372).This in turn promotes the key values and attitudes of "informed and responsible attitudes" and "intercultural understanding" which are highlighted in the HSIE K-6 Syllabus (2007, p. 8).

 

Finally, the specific content in this article is also suitable to be used in teaching and learning activities which draw from the English Syllabus. English outcome EN3-7C states that students should "think imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identif[y] connections between texts when responding to and composing texts" (BOSTES, 2015, English K-10 Syllabus online). Outcome EN3-8D states that a student "identifies and considers how different viewpoints of their world, including aspects of culture, are represented in texts" (BOSTES, 2015, English K-10 Syllabus online). Both of these outcomes can be explicitly explored through engagement with this resource. Using the poems and stories provided through this article as literary texts allows for this content to be integrated across Key Learning Areas. 

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author. 

 

Board of Studies Teaching and Educational Standards NSW. (2015). English K-10 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Brophy, J. & Alleman, J. (2009). Meaningful social studies for elementary students. Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice, 15(3), 357-376.

 

Craven, R. (ND). Selection Criteria: Aboriginal Cultural Studies and Aboriginal perspectives across the curriculum.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (Eds.). (2014). Teaching humanities and social sciences: History, geography, economics & citizenship in the Australian curriculum. Fifth Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Digital Collections - Books - [Referendum, 27 May 1967 : ephemera relating to the campaign on the questions of Parliament and aboriginals].

Digital Collections - Books - [Referendum, 27 May 1967 : ephemera relating to the campaign on the questions of Parliament and aboriginals]. | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it

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'Vote YES for Aborigines'

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Veronica McShane's curator insight, September 4, 2013 11:35 PM

campaign poster from the time, "Vote YES for Aborgines"

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Reconciliation Australia 1967 Referendum

Reconciliation Australia 1967 Referendum | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it

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Djandunmarra's curator insight, September 25, 2013 11:52 PM

This website tells us about the Referendum that occured in 1967. It tells us how long the campaign was held for and tells us that this event was the first stage of the recncililation movemnet in Australia. 

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Gary Williams remembers the Aborigine referendum

In 1967, Australians voted to include Aborigines and Torres Straits Islanders on the national census. Gary Williams remembers what it meant to a 21-year-old ...

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Australian 1967 Referendum - Creative Spirits

Australian 1967 Referendum - Creative Spirits | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it
The 1967 referendum made history: Australians voted overwhelmingly to amend the constitution to include Aboriginal people in the census and allow the Commonwealth to create laws for them.

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Scott's curator insight, April 10, 2015 10:06 PM

As the 1967 Referendum is all about Indigenous Australians, it is important that the teaching provided on this topic is seen from both sides, Indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

This website although created and written by a non-indigenous man. But through collaboration with indigenous peoples, has such cultural sensitivity and a clear respect and love for Indigenous culture.
It is important however as teachers to evaluate the validity of the information being presented about indigenous Australians. When analysing this resource against the Resource Guide for Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies, five key evaluation criteria need to be established (Queensland Studies Authority, 2007, p. 2).

Authenticity: The resources as a website was established in 1999, Although some of the information presented is from a later time the way it is viewed is to reveal the bias towards indigenous people such information holds. When it comes to the referendum it reveals what the non-indigenous perspective was on the even and then reveals what the event actually meant to indigenous Australians.

Balanced nature of the presentation: The page about
the referendum shows a good balance of both male and female perspectives on the event. As well as being in collaboration with Indigenous people.  

Aboriginal/ Torres Strait Islander Participation: The Author who is non-indigenous references and acknowledges Indigenous collaboration within his information presented, he also has links to information, books and stories written by Indigenous people throughout the website.

Accuracy and Support: According to the creator the resource is highly visited and praised by multiple Indigenous communities that can be viewed on the page. All the information provided is linked to further support documents and source information usually written by Indigenous individuals. 

Exclusion of a secret or sacred nature: From what can be seen there does not seem to be any information of a secret or sacred cultural nature being wrongly displayed through the resource. 
 

The site challenges misconception about the referendum and provides a rich variety of information in different forms such as text, tables, youtube videos ect. This makes it a very engaging resources for the teaching of this Key event in the development of Australian democracy from multiple perspectives.   

References:
Queensland Studies Authority. (2007). Selecting and evaluating resources. Retrieved 11 April 2015, from

https://www.qsa.qld.edu.au/downloads/approach/indigenous_g008_0712.pdf

 

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Racism. No Way.: Fact Sheets: Mabo and Wik

Racism. No Way.: Fact Sheets: Mabo and Wik | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it
This website aims to tackle racism in schools in Australia, through providing teachers, school students, parents and governors with games, research and lesson ideas that explore the causes and effects of racism for practical use in the classroom.

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Concise explanation of Mabo and Wik

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DJ Welsh's curator insight, May 14, 2013 9:24 PM

Concise explanation of Mabo and Wik.

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Professor Michael Crommelin "Mabo: The Decision and the Debate" – Parliament of Australia

Professor Michael Crommelin "Mabo: The Decision and the Debate" – Parliament of Australia | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it

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A Senate research paper

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DJ Welsh's curator insight, May 14, 2013 9:29 PM

A Senate research paper.

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Indigenous, Media, Public Ideas – Attending to Aboriginal Policy after Mabo: Including the 'They' Community

Indigenous, Media, Public Ideas – Attending to Aboriginal Policy after Mabo: Including the 'They' Community | Australian Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Australian Aboriginals, Indigenous Peoples, Media Issues

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Some oppositions to the native title

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DJ Welsh's curator insight, May 14, 2013 9:33 PM

Some opposition to native title.