Cities, Rivers and Mountains of NSW
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Burramatta Lands walking trail

Burramatta Lands walking trail | Cities, Rivers and Mountains of NSW | Scoop.it

Explore the history of the Burramatta People and the Parramatta River 

Sarah's insight:

The Burramutta Lands walking trail guide, is a self guided trail along the Parramatta river. It is created by Parramatta City Council and is on their ‘Discover Parramatta’ website, the trail was created as a discovery exploration, to inform the public about the traditional custodians of the land. The trail explores the history of the Burramatta people who lived in the Parramatta area. It will be an informative site study excursion, as the walking trail gives students the opportunity to learn about Burramatta’s peoples way of living before and after British colonisation.

 

The guide takes students along the Parramatta river, and highlights key areas that are of interest in regards to the importance of the river for food, gatherings, trade, relations with the Europeans, notable aboriginal individuals and the natural environment. It will deepen a student’s understanding of the way Aboriginal peoples have used and interacted with the environment (Outcome ENS2.5) and also allow them to collect and use primary and secondary resources to investigate the history of the community with Aboriginal people (Outcome CCS.2.2).  These outcomes can be achieved through primary resources that students are able to see and use as evidence, such as hand paintings, cave shelters and ‘scar’ trees. This resource Parramatta River and its history from an Aboriginal perspective can also be used for the ‘First Contacts’ topic in the new stage 2 history syllabus.

 

Before the excursion teachers can introduce the history of Parramatta, so students can build upon this knowledge when on the excursion. After a historical study, a lesson can focus comparative study on land management and use by the Burramatta people and the Europeans back then and now. Another lesson could involve students researching about the land in regards to flora and fauna from the land and the water.

 

Resources for supplementary information:

 

http://www.parracity.nsw.gov.au/play/facilities/heritage_centre/local_studies__and__family_history_library  (Excursion could include a visit to the Local Studies & Family History for further information, research and resources)

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Murray Darling

Murray Darling | Cities, Rivers and Mountains of NSW | Scoop.it
It might have started raining in some places but the 'big dry' is still a big issue. People are stressed there isn't enough water in the country's largest river system - the Murray Darling. In fact the lakes at the bottom of it are drying up because there's hardly any water flowing down. Now the pollies reckon they've come up with a solution that will see lots of money poured into the rivers to make them healthy again. Here's Sarah with the details.
Sarah's insight:

To supplement the mountains and rivers activity and bring the focus onto NSW, this Behind the News video brings forward the issues surrounding the Murray Darling river system, for example issues about its environmental sustainability, the importance of the system to Australia’s food production and the politics that revolves around which state government is responsible for the river system. The video can be used as an introduction into the river systems so students can be made aware of their geographical location. 

 

We can apply Schellens and Valcke’s (2005) first basic cognitive processing activity the “presentation of new information” by using it as an opportunity to build a knowledge foundation base of the Murray Darling. We can use this resource to engage with the students by brainstorming and sharing their own experience and knowledge, which upon they can build on through further study of the topic. With the few issues that were brought up in the video, we can branch off into issues relating to the Murray Darling, for example using the environmental sustainability component and ask students to research who uses and is involved with the river; farmers, citizens, animals, politicians.  Then using this information to create a poster/presentation from the view of these different stakeholders of the river, arguing the importance of their relationship with the river system.

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Australia's Cities, States and Territories

Australia's Cities, States and Territories | Cities, Rivers and Mountains of NSW | Scoop.it
Sarah's insight:

The history of Australia and her states and territories is discussed briefly on this teachers can use this webpage to introduce the states and territories of Australia and their capital cities to the students.  A map can be given to the students to label the states and territories and their cities.  The webpage also includes information of the states and territories on the area size and population relative to each other without including the number data.

 

Teachers can develop student’s research and statistical skills to find the real numbers. Students can then be asked to present their findings graphically eg. a pie or column graph, to represent the population and area size of the states using their numeracy skills.  This process is akin to Schellen and Valke’s (2005) three basic cognitive processing activities, with the presentation of new information in the form of the webpage, that information is refined through explicitation by researching for explicit data concerning the given information, eg, find specific information of the cities and lastly the evaluation of this information through the use of graphical skills to make the information easier to compare and contrast. The teacher can then focus on NSW ask students to breakdown the population of the state by identifying the major cities and the geographical distribution of the population in NSW through more research by the students. 

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Comparing Australia to Indonesia.

Comparing Australia to Indonesia. | Cities, Rivers and Mountains of NSW | Scoop.it
Comparing life in Australia to Indonesia. The Dutch began to colonize Indonesia in the early 17th century; Japan occupied the islands from 1942 to 1945. Indonesia declared its independence after Japan's surrender, but it required four years of intermittent negotiations, recurring hostilities, and UN mediation before the Netherlands agreed to transfer sovereignty in 1949. Indonesia's first free parliamentary election after decades of repressive rule took place in 1999. Indonesia is now the world's third-largest democracy, the world's largest archipelagic state, and home to the world's largest Muslim population. Current issues include: alleviating poverty, improving education, preventing terrorism, ...
Sarah's insight:

This website has an overview of Indonesia, introducing its’ history and other useful information about Australia’s northerly neighbour.  From the global perspective Indonesia can be introduced to the class in a compare and contrast approach. Using the previous work done with “Australia’s Cities, States and Territories” scoop.it we can again get students to research and present their findings of Indonesia in the same way then use this information to compare with their results of Australia as an initial task before using the resource, so the students have a general understanding of the country. 

 

This website is a great resource as it compares Indonesia to Australia in regards to infant mortality rate, electricity use, consumption of oil, life expectancy, health care and more.  It also gives students an idea of the size of Indonesia to Australia with a map. Students can use these statistics to question why there is a stark difference, to critically analyse this new information presented, which according to Schellen and Valke (2005) will let students reflect, reason and making justifications on these differences in comparison to their own experiences. This helps students to describe Indonesians with their interaction in the social, political and natural environment that affects their position, and also what can be done to change those statistics.

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Australian rocks and mountains | australia.gov.au

Australian rocks and mountains | australia.gov.au | Cities, Rivers and Mountains of NSW | Scoop.it
Sarah's insight:

This website does an overview of the most important mountain range of Australia, the Great Dividing Range, with information links to Australia’s longest rivers and highest mountains. The information is presented in text and would be a great resource for teachers to allow students to use this text to firstly label the Great Dividing Range on a plain topographical map of the Australia, then using the information links to label mountains and rivers with the help of an atlas. (Map of the capital cities completed in previous lesson could also be used) This will activity will help students develop their literacy, comprehension skills with identifying the Great Dividing Range, geography skills like mapping by reading an atlas.

 

Schellsn and Valcke (2005) presents the idea of refinement and elaboration of ideas, and we can refine the new information the students gain by focusing on the Great Dividing Range, students can research and create a historical project, about their formation and include information of historical people who have connections to range, ie. Blaxland, Lawson and Wentworth. The flora and fauna of the area can also be used to create awareness of the threat of extinction of wildlife with further refinement by investigating the environmental degradation of habitats. This encourages students to form their own informed ideas and opinions of such topics like wildlife conservation.. 

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