Exploring the Cultural Cohesiveness of Australia (CUS3.3)
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New Australian immigration patterns - YouTube

Every capital city has a China town, a little Italy and a Greek quarter, but in Australia today there are plenty of other cultural enclaves.
Dean Dray's insight:

Migration to Australia

 

This video would be used in a stage 3 classroom assisting students in developing an understanding of the cultural diversity of Australia. It presents recent data from 2010 and 2011, allowing students to develop an understanding of "WHO" and "WHY" people from other countries have migrated to Australia.

        

The resource could may be used as an introduction to a unit on the cultural diversity of Australia. Students are to investigate the top 10 countries presented in the film, researching the food, religion, clothing (e.c.t) that are traditional to these people and discuss how the demographic makeup has changed due to migration. For example, are there shops in the area that promote a particular culture? Students will  consider the benefits of migration, to the Australian population.  This activity will teach students the value in accepting and understanding other cultures, as todays classrooms continue to grow in diversity, as does the Australian Landscape.

 

A culturally responsive pedagogy should be adopted in the classroom, where effective teaching and learning occurs in a “culturally supported, learner-centered context, whereby the strengths students bring to school are identified, nurtured, and utilized to promote student achievement” (Richards & Brown et al., 2006).  

 

Assessment: Students need to investigate through data provided, popular migrant countries. Using the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) students will research the birth place of parents in a particular location. Students will be assigned a particular location and need to graph the differing countries whereby people where born. From this data students will discuss why Australia has many migrates, this could be completed as a whole class or in small groups. Students will gain an understanding that the Australian population consist if many migrants. 

 

Reference

 

Richards, H., Brown, A. & Ford, T. (2006). Addressing Diversity in Schools: Culturally Responsive Pedagogy. [e-book] Arizona, United States of America: Arizona State University. pp. 1-2. http://www.nccrest.org/Briefs/Diversity_Brief.pdf [Accessed: 4 Apr 2014].

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Aboriginal Cultural Perspective

Aboriginal Cultural Perspective | Exploring the Cultural Cohesiveness of Australia (CUS3.3) | Scoop.it
Dean Dray's insight:

This resource is recommended for a stage 3 classroom. Students will investigate the cultural diversity amongst the Australian Aboriginal culture of the Murray Darling region. However I believe for this activity to me more effective and meaningful for the students, it needs to be localized.

 

Classroom teachers can use this as a template and adapt it to the local Indigenous community, allowing students to investigate the varying cultural practices, languages groups and customs within small region. To supplement this activity students could observe a language map to view the differentiation within the Aboriginal culture.

 

To develop a greater understanding of the diversity within the Aboriginal culture students could be assessed through investigating the similarities and differences between two language groups. The teacher could scaffold the lesson through the use of a graphic organizer, for example a vein diagram. This allows students to organise information in a logical manner, furthermore this may assist in linking it to prior knowledge.  

 

This activity allows students to critically analyse the information and form connections between the two language groups. Therefore students are become facilitators of their own learning and are participating in an inquiring pedagogy of learning.  

 

Discovering HSIE. 2012. HSIE Pedagogy. [online] Available at: http://discoveringhsie.weebly.com/hsie-pedagogy.html [Accessed: 28 Mar 2014].

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Harmony Day 2013: Many Stories – One Australia

Harmony Day 2013: Many Stories – One Australia | Exploring the Cultural Cohesiveness of Australia (CUS3.3) | Scoop.it

Australia’s cultural diversity is one of our greatest strengths and is at the heart of who we are. We all make up the pages of a bigger Australia and we all have a story to tell. We invite you to tell your story with each other – in workplaces, on social network sites, at schools or within communities.You may also choose to share your story with all Australians by taking a photo, filming a video, or writing an article.Share your story today.
Email: harmonyday@immi.gov.au


Via Maree Whiteley
Dean Dray's insight:

This stimulus could be used in a stage 3 classroom, to encourage the students to participate in personal reflection (Hinett, 2008). It could be used as a lead up activity towards Harmony Day or to get students to think about the cultural cohesiveness of Australia. Students can brainstorm as a group, why they think Australia is a popular location for people to live. Here the teacher can introduce new factual information to stimulate student thinking. Introducing words such as education, health, to seek refuge, employment ect.

 

Brainstorm and list the birthplace of children in the class and their parents or grandparents. Graph these results and discuss the outcomes, e.g. country where most were born, reasons why there are so many different groups represented in the graph. Use ABS data to compare own class or school to the Australia in general. This numeracy strategy will assist students in comparing class, school or local community with Australia. Does the community have a similar multicultural make-up as other parts of Australia?

 

This activity will get students to visually understand that there are many people living in Australia whom have a connection to another country. This will support students in understanding that other nations have assisted in shaping the Australian people of today.

 

Hinett, K. 2008. Improving learning through reflection – part one. [online] Available at: http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/documents/resources/database/id485_improving_learning_part_one.pdf [Accessed: 28 Mar 2014].

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, February 27, 2013 8:16 AM

What's your story?

Maree Whiteley's curator insight, February 27, 2013 8:29 AM

What's your story?

Greta Brewin's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:35 AM

Harmony Day is a day designed to celebrate Australia’s cultural diversity and multiculturalism. It is on the 21st of March and it is often celebrated in schools. This website provides information, products, classroom activities, stories, and event registration. The classroom activities would be very useful for implementing Harmony Day into the classroom and getting the students involved. The classroom activities are designed to create tolerance, empathy, and understanding. The day is designed to appreciate everyone and make him or her feel as though they belong. Students often dress up it traditional clothing and share traditional food from the ethnic, religious or cultural background. 

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Refugees and Asylum Seekers

Refugees and  Asylum Seekers | Exploring the Cultural Cohesiveness of Australia (CUS3.3) | Scoop.it
Dean Dray's insight:

World vision is a great resource that teachers can use to assist in the teaching of Refugees and Asylum Seekers. This can then be centalised to how they are treated and integrated into Australia. The Website allows teachers to source information on a range of topics, however the worksheets provided on Asylum seekers and Refugees uses a graphic organiser, this may be more useful for students to grasp the concept being taught. 

 

As a class or in small groups, students should brainstorm what they think an “ASYLUM SEEKER” and REFUGEE” is, and compare their responses to the UN definition, this will assist in clearing any misconceptions. In class, or in smaller groups, they can discuss what attitudes are evident towards refugees and asylum seekers. Is the word ‘refugee’ always applied correctly? Why or why not?

 

Assessment: Ask students to research how many Refugees arrive in Australia.  After reading a memoir of a Refugee, Students need to create a piece of creative writing, Imaging you were a refugee traveling from Sudan, How was your journey to Australia? Why did you leave your country? How have the Australian people welcomed you to their county? This literacy strategy promotes students to be creative but within a factual framework of the persona of a refugee. This formative assessment will assist in gather documentation to evaluate if students have achieved the desired outcome  (McInerney and McInerney, 2010, p. 360)

 

This is a global perspective as students explore the reasons why Asylum seekers and Refugees travel to Australia. It also allows students to appreciate the culture that the people bring to Australia and understand that Australia is a very cultural diverse nation. 

 

References

 

McInerney, D., & McInerney, V.  (2010). Educational Psychology: Constructing Learning. NSW: Pearsons Australia.

 

Teacher Resource. (2009). Why Teach about Refugees?. [online] Retrieved from: http://www.refugeeweek.org.au/resources/2012_RW_ResourceKit_Ch5.pdf [Accessed: 6 Apr 2014].

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Australian Identities

Australian Identities | Exploring the Cultural Cohesiveness of Australia (CUS3.3) | Scoop.it
Dean Dray's insight:

This activity will assist a stage 3 students in breaking down stereotypes of who an Australian person is. Students will need to research one significant Australian identity, choosing an identity how has been the Australian of the Year. Students will participate in an inquiry process and investigate Who, What, Where, When and Why they are/were the Australian of the Year.

 

The inquiring process is a socio-constructivist approach to learning that promotes students to be the facilitator of their own learning, inviting new knowledge through child directed exploration of learning, questioning, peer interaction and reflective thinking (Reynolds, 2009). Self- constructed learning ensures deep knowledge, engagement in learning experiences and higher order thinking on Blooms taxonomy of questioning (Reynolds, 2009)

 

Brooks and Brooks 1999 states that we are all responsible for our own learning and it’s the teachers responsibility to create an educational environment that allows students to actively be willing to contribute to their own learning (Rashid, 2012). This activity will assist students in developing an understanding that there is not just one ‘typical Australian’, and invite students to develop a more open-minded appreciation for the cultural diversity of the Australian population. 

 

Assessment: Students will produces a report on the Identity of their own choosing from the Australian of the Year web page. http://www.australianoftheyear.org.au  Using a formative assessment approach allows teacher to gather documentation to assist in evaluating if the students has achieved the desired outcome. 

 

Reference

 

Cornwell, J. (2011). Approach to Teaching and Learning in HSIE. [online] Retrieved from: http://juliahsie.wordpress.com/importance-of-teaching-hsie/ [Accessed: 21 Mar 2014].

 

Rashid, M. (2012). HSIE and Inquiry-Based Learning. [online] Retrieved from: http://juliannerashid91.wordpress.com/hsie-and-inquiry-pedagogy/ [Accessed: 21 Mar 2014].

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