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Why Australia hates thinkers

Why Australia hates thinkers | Australia | Scoop.it
Australia is a vast, sunny, intellectual gulag. But why?

Via Tony Hall
Geodude's insight:

This article is about intellectuals. It tells about how the Australian government cutting funds from colleges to fund education. I don't this makes a lot of sense, and in the article it says that Australia "hates thinkers."

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Tony Hall's curator insight, May 14, 2013 12:54 AM

This is true. And sad. While I'm no Einstein, I do have very clear memories of being teased because of the stuff I knew. And not just by other kids at school, but by their parents (to a lesser extent) as well. This article also makes me think about the Tea Party situation that arose in the States. It seemed to me that being ignorant of issues was being celebrated and anyone who showed the slightest sign of intelligence was shouted & howled down by the baying beast that is the digital media. It makes think of the Cultural Revolution in China and the Khmer Rouge takeover of Cambodia. 

Rescooped by Geodude from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
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Australia: Labor not the only party clueless about its cybers | ZDNet

Australia: Labor not the only party clueless about its cybers | ZDNet | Australia | Scoop.it

Security is not often seen as a driver for innovation. More often than not, it's seen as the uncomfortable problem that needs to be solved in order to meet regulatory requirements, if there is regulation for it at all.

 

It's been seen time and time again as one of the biggest roadblocks to new technologies. Cloud? The biggest concerns are privacy and security. Big data? Again, how our information is scraped and stored. BYOD? Security and data loss prevention. The list goes on.

 

Both major political parties in Australia have decided that yes, a National Broadband Network (NBN) is necessary, and yes, the future is going to be about the digital economy. But if this virtual economy is meant to be the next big thing for saving our country since digging up rocks, why is it that no one is debating about what has been a historically huge roadblock?

 

When the Labor government released its update to the National Digital Economy Strategy (NDES), I wondered whether it even knew what it was doing when it came to securing the online space and making it a suitable place for business.

 

Most of what was in the strategy failed to inspire me, given that it spoke mostly of education, neglected to include any actual executable plans or strategies for businesses or government, and generally rehashed what we have been doing as a country for the past five years or so.

 

But if I found Labor's performance lacklustre, the Coalition's plan leaves me wanting to flip some tables.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Geodude's insight:

This article talks about politics. It is about how political parties need to discuss security for a national broadband network.

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KaitlynandSydney's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:42 PM

This article is in the politicagroup up because in the text it talks about how the political parties debating whether to keep the national broabrand network

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Muslims Paying Australian Aborigines to Convert to Islam - FrontPage Magazine

Muslims Paying Australian Aborigines to Convert to Islam - FrontPage Magazine | Australia | Scoop.it
FrontPage Magazine Muslims Paying Australian Aborigines to Convert to Islam FrontPage Magazine “I don't know whether people are aware, but many of the Aboriginal people in northern Australia are being targeted by Muslims and in some cases are being...
Geodude's insight:

This article is about religion. It talks about Muslims targeting aboriginals and sometimes even paying them to convert to Islam.

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Australia: One hundred years of regional anxiety: how our leaders have talked about Asia | The Conversation

Australia: One hundred years of regional anxiety: how our leaders have talked about Asia | The Conversation | Australia | Scoop.it

It seems 2012 was all about Asia: from the Australia in the Asian Century White Paper, to the possible repercussions of the Obama administration’s “Pacific turn”, and the continued rise of China. These conversations will continue into next year’s federal election.

 

While the specific shape of recent discussions of Australia’s place in the world may be new, the underlying dynamics that frame the debate are not.

 

They are informed by an enduring sense of isolation and ambivalence in a nation torn between its traditional Western allegiances and the promise of economic prosperity signalled by China becoming its largest trading partner. This tension between history and geography has long characterised the language of Australia’s political leaders.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Geodude's insight:

This article is about Area/Geo. It talks about how Australia is torn between its western allegiances and trading with China.

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andrew desrochers's curator insight, May 22, 2015 1:56 PM

How and why does Australia's geography shape it's people, relations with other countries, and trade partners? Does it have a positive or negative affect on the country?

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Australia: Coalition to end the NBN monopoly | Business Spectator

Australia: Coalition to end the NBN monopoly | Business Spectator | Australia | Scoop.it

If the Coalition wins this year’s election, two things will happen to the NBN: it will no longer be a monopoly and it will become about half user pays.
 
I understand one of the key elements of the Coalition’s NBN policy, to be released in a few weeks, is that Telstra will be able to compete with the NBN Co as a wholesale provider of broadband internet access using its hybrid fibre-coaxial (HFC) cable.
 
Under the current deal between Telstra and the NBN, Telstra is to be paid for migrating customers from both the copper access network and the HFC to the NBN, other than pay TV customers.
 
This means Telstra and the NBN Co will compete in the cities, where Telstra’s HFC cable passes about 600,000 homes, but not in regional areas, where NBN Co will retain a monopoly.
 
That, in turn, means two things: first, Telstra will continue to be an integrated retail/wholesale operator in the cities and the “structural separation” of Telstra will be confined to places where it has no HFC cable, and second, internet prices in the city are likely to be lower than in the bush.
 
Coalition communications spokesman, Malcolm Turnbull, is likely to defend the idea of a price differential between the city and the bush by legislating a uniform maximum price for wholesale internet access across Australia. If it is lower in some areas because of competition, then it’s felt that this will be politically acceptable as long as the maximum is reasonable.
 
Australia will therefore have a wholesale internet duopoly, with one of the two players also a retailer able to use its competitor’s network to deliver services as well. Should make the ACCC’s life more interesting.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Geodude's insight:

This article is economic. It talks about a company that may be affected by an election.

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I do believe the immigration levels can go up - Sydney Morning Herald

I do believe the immigration levels can go up - Sydney Morning Herald | Australia | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning Herald
I do believe the immigration levels can go up
Sydney Morning Herald
Apart from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, everyone came to Australia by boat or plane, he said.
Geodude's insight:

This article is social. It is about how the immigration levels can go up. 

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