aussie icons
6 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Caddy Storage
Scoop.it!

Ute Liners & Ute Lids - A Part of the Aussie Icon

Ute Liners & Ute Lids - A Part of the Aussie Icon | aussie icons | Scoop.it

The humble Aussie ute has evolved over time and ute liners and lids have now become just as much a part of the aussie icon as the vehicle themselves. 

Caddy Storage's insight:

Engineering icons evolve over time and the Australian ute has definitely followed this trend. Lids, liners, accessories are all a part of the ute fit out and thus becoming a part of the icon.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caddy Storage
Scoop.it!

Holden's beaut ute doesn't deserve bullet - Stuff.co.nz

Holden's beaut ute doesn't deserve bullet - Stuff.co.nz | aussie icons | Scoop.it
Stuff.co.nz Holden's beaut ute doesn't deserve bullet Stuff.co.nz Such a comparison ignores just how sophisticated the Holden ute has become, especially with the recent change to new electronic architecture for the VF-generation, which allows the...
Caddy Storage's insight:

I think the ute should remain manufactured local as it's one of the top aussie icons of Australia.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Caddy Storage from National Identity
Scoop.it!

Australian Geographic's 100 Aussie icons

Australian Geographic's 100 Aussie icons | aussie icons | Scoop.it
From the sacred and the profound to the almost unbelievable, here are our picks of the top 100 Aussie icons

Via Vivian Huynh
Caddy Storage's insight:

Rightfully placed the Australian ute is one of the top ingenious icons. Some really typical Aussie icons

more...
Vivian Huynh's curator insight, April 17, 2013 10:09 AM

Fantastic starting point for introducing national symbols and Australian culture whilst familiarising with what students are already familiar with. By allowing students to identify the various symbols and icons in the centre image, educators can familiarise themselves with the prior knowledge of each student and the class as a whole to work towards planning the most appropriately suited lessons for that class in that topic. The site lists the one-hundred icons considered to be Australian with a brief description, using the image consisting those one-hundred icons, as a class determine what students are most familiar with (what they recognise) and then let students convey what they wish to learn more about (engaging more students with their learning). The site also works well for teachers to extend their lessons to explore varying aspects of Australian culture, for example: Exploring Banjo Paterson's poems and ballads and what kind of image is painted about the country during that time.

 

Brief task for students to do, is to pick one symbol each, and linking to literacy, write a few short paragraphs describing how that symbol represents Australia (only a short descriptive and informative text, not a recount or report). In addition to this task, take each of the 100 icons and place them on a large plain map of Australia with some brief information alongside each icon. This acts as a graphic organiser (Petty, 2009, pp. 115-130) which may help students become familiar with Australia and its history, as well as the geographic location of events and its influences. e.g. Why are the main cities along the coasts? When the  people mainly reached Australia by boat, which is along the coast.

 

This particular website is also very sufficient to demonstrate how various symbols, from the past (e.g. Ned Kelly) and also more recently developed (e.g. Surfing) all contribute to the changing Australian culture but are all still symbols of Australia. They reflect influences on the changes in Australia towards developing the "Australian Identity".

 

Reference:

G. Petty. 2009. Evidence-Based Teaching: A Practical Approach. Second Edition.