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Defining Outcomes in Arts Education

Defining Outcomes in Arts Education | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
Arts skills are for everyone, not just the future actors and directors and stage carpenters of America. For many children, the only opportunity for this experience is in school.
MAM_Music's insight:

Impact Creativity is an initiative of the National Corporate Theatre Fund that started in 2012, with the goal of raising $5mil within 3 years to support arts education in 19 cities.  The article brings up an interesting point that many nonprofits struggle with when it comes to their programs.  Simply stating your cause may not compel everyone you meet; organizations need to better communicate the tangible impact to their communities and donors.-Kimmy

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Cleveland Orchestra poised to create and appease a stronger base in Europe

Cleveland Orchestra poised to create and appease a stronger base in Europe | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
While the Cleveland Orchestra played repeatedly to enthusiastic, sold-out crowds in Europe, administrators and others established new connections and explored ways for the group to increase its profile overseas.
MAM_Music's insight:
Katie: The Cleveland Orchestra discusses its strategy to increase and strengthen partnerships abroad, including a possible residency in Paris. But with so many resources devoted internationally, what is happening back in Cleveland?
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MAM_Music's comment, December 4, 2013 11:27 AM
That relates to the broader issue of balancing organizational mission and sustainability. The Cleveland Orchestra spends time abroad because it increases the prestige of the orchestra and remain viable, but it is failing to pay adequate attention to the Cleveland community. Perhaps it needs to reevaluate its community and reach- is it really the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra- or is it an international symphony orchestra that is based in Cleveland? Similar issues are occurring with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra- the area surrounding the Max M. Fisher Center is so destitute that the DSO has increasingly focused on high-profile performances in NYC, livecasts of their performances, and perhaps most telling, a series of concerts that occur in the more affluent suburbs surrounding Detroit. When an organization changes its focus, it must reevaluate its mission and the community it is serving- a change in focus means a change in stakeholders. These stakeholders must inform every facet of the organization. -Erin
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Artists to digitally enhance Broadway - The Sacramento Bee

Artists to digitally enhance Broadway - The Sacramento Bee | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
Armed with a $20,000 grant, 11 artists from around the country have been chosen to create public art that will change the face of Sacramento’s Broadway – virtually.
MAM_Music's insight:
The NEA has given the Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission a $20k grant to launch a new art project, "Broadway Augmented."  This is not your typical art project.  "Broadway Augmented" will use a new cutting edge technology that is quickly spreading in the arts world, Augmented Realty.  11 selected artists will create the public artwork.  Augmented realty will take their work to a whole new level, transforming their creations into "computer-generated sound, video, graphics, or data."  SMAC's project just proves that the arts will always evolve, and this project is a great way to not only reach new audiences, but truly make their experiences worthwhile.  Arts organizations need to engage the new wave of audiences differently than they have in the past.  SMAC's participatory street art is a new and creative form of engagement that is one way to answer the problem.

Other examples of augmented reality in the arts:
Portland:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cj14pS35iC8
LA:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAtHjySUoHM

-Kimmy
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MAMDance's comment, November 30, 2013 8:04 PM
(Allison) Interesting article. I've read it multiple times, but am having trouble formulating why I'm not exactly convinced or excited about the idea. If the "future of design" and public art is having to view the pieces from an iPhone, I'm not sure I want to be a part of that future. It may seem like a cool idea and will certainly draw people in for a period of time, but what are the real, long term benefits of this project? How is this really going to impact the energy or feeling that one gets when walking down this street?
MAM_Music's comment, December 1, 2013 12:40 PM
I definitely see your point. It's a little unclear whether this project will be like other AR artwork, where there is still something to physically see. The street art in Portland and LA are very much tangible, but use AR to enhance the user experience. Public art brings beauty to a community; public murals and sculptures stand on their own, but Portland and LA have introduced a new way for people to interact with their street art. Everyone connects to art in different ways, and some will definitely benefit from a different form of public art.<br><br>So I went onto SMAC's website to find more details about their plan and found: http://www.sacmetroarts.org/whats-new.html<br>It sounds like their project will be completely virtual, but that this project will lead to a commission of a permanent work. Audiences will be able to take a survey on each piece of work, and their feedback will influence which artwork will be constructed into reality. -Kimmy
MAM Theater's curator insight, December 1, 2013 11:31 PM

Ying: Augmented reality is definitely worth our attention in arts industry. We have seen so many films, such as Minority Report, Iron Man3, and the Avengers, utilizing augmented reality to strengthen its visual effects and incorporate the film audience into the movies. Though it sounds like visual arts, it can actually be implemented in performing arts as well. It may be possible that in the near future, people can use apps on their smartphones to see real opera singers sing (with real person) without the need to go into the theaters, which might jeopardize the marketing of opera houses, but also make opera more accessible to common people, and invite them to come into the theaters.

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Encouraging Your Child's Exploration of the Arts . Music & Arts . Education | PBS Parents

Encouraging Your Child's Exploration of the Arts . Music & Arts . Education | PBS Parents | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
What should you do when your child has expressed interest in dance or theatre? Before you overspend consider these tips for encouraging your child’s exploration of the arts.
MAM_Music's insight:

Institutions can work to foster an appreciation for the arts through giving communities the framework they need to learn and practice. For example, The PBS website offers guidelines for encouraging children's exploration of the arts. They focus on setting guidelines for exploration and creativity, reminding the parents that a journey into the arts does not necessarily end with a career path- or rather, the arts are  an adventure rather than a destination. This is an example of the kind of framework that could be provided by arts organizations to foster an artistic longing within the community. These guidelines and tips, which come as second nature to anyone that has an art background, can make the difference between whether or not a potential newcomer to the arts decides to participate and get involved. Providing a framework to fostering expression and creativity to the arts focuses overwhelmed novices on attainable goals. -Erin

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MAMDance's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:05 PM

KF: I agree with Erin in terms of this being a potential framework for arts organizations to use when cultivating young arts participants and their first learning experiences.  I especially like the quotation, which Erin also references: "The real point is that a parent’s focus should be on the exploration—or the journey—rather than thinking about the destination— or where this interest might lead."  The arts, including dance, is much more than just the final destination.  I did not pursue professional ballet (hello injuries and lack of amazing dance talent/skill), but years of training definitely affected my life for the better...minus the injuries.  As we all know, skills learned through the arts can be applicable in many different aspects of life. 

 

Sidenote: the picture is really cute!

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Publishing Magazines For An 'Ambidextrous' Generation

Publishing Magazines For An 'Ambidextrous' Generation | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
The American Reader magazine is betting readers want "deeper engagement" — online and in print.
MAM_Music's insight:

Katie: Who pays for online content? Is it degrading to the creative minds producing that content if it's distributed for free? Is it, as John MacArthur, publisher of Harpers, claims, potentially catastrophic? Does a comparable "compact" exist between musician and listener as between writer and reader? And if so, does distributing music for free online, as symphony orchestras are beginning to do, "violate" that compact? This broadcast from NPR explores the use (and nonuse) of paywalls in online publishing and poses important questions for symphony orchestras and other providers of classical music to consider as they begin to distribute musical content online, in the form of live broadcasts, concert recordings, and interviews with musicians. In what ways does the classical music industry mirror publishing and in what ways does it diverge? Is orchestral music sufficiently unique to successfully utilize a paywall or is it ubiqutous, like the news, suggesting that listeners will go to where they can consume it for free? Do individual symphony orchestras have the reputation and panache of organizations like The New York Times or the Wall Street Journal (which do use paywalls) where listeners would be willing to pay for the high level of musical quality they know they will receive?

 

Or perhaps is it more appropriate to think of online content as distinct from in-person experiences, as Uzoamaka Maduka argues is true for publishing? Note her claim that the Millennial generation is ambidextrous, wanting choices between digital and physical experiences and seeing those as extensions of one another, not "different versions of the same thing." Do you think that's true, and if so, does it offer a glimmer of hope for classical music organizations as they enter the sphere of online distribution? Be sure to listen to the broadcast itself (link is at the top of the page), as the written summary focuses heavily on The American Reader while the broadcast draws from multiple viewpoints.  

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Moved By Kennedy's Death, The Boston Symphony Played On

Moved By Kennedy's Death, The Boston Symphony Played On | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
The orchestra's decision turned a moment of shock into an opportunity for consolation.
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L.A. Opera's unlikely — and unusual — 'The Magic Flute'

L.A. Opera's unlikely — and unusual — 'The Magic Flute' | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
In a bare rehearsal space downtown at the Music Center, a dozen or so people work through a scene in the dark.
MAM_Music's insight:

Melody: I thought that this article related to parts of the class discussions we had about technology. Essentially, the LA Opera incorporated animation and live performance elements into its “The Magic Flute” show. It seems like the scenes and backgrounds are all projected onto a screen with animations and multimedia while there are live singers interacting with the animations. Part of the opera’s decision to do this is because they felt that the audience wanted to see something new. The opera wanted to create something that would be more relatable to the audience and that people would enjoy. I remember that this week’s guest speaker said that operas have super high fixed costs and I’m wondering if this model could decrease those high fixed costs. However, using a projected screen with animations does take a lot away from the traditional form of opera. 

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MAM Presenting's comment, November 24, 2013 11:42 PM
I think the use of technology as a means of reducing the high fixed costs of opera's is a really interesting idea...While the use of the projected screen, as Kimmy sates, may take away from the traditional form of opera, it may provide a really unique opportunity for struggling operas and smaller companies. On the flip-side, I wonder how this type of technology would fit with a more serious/tragic opera.... - Marissa
MAM Presenting's comment, November 25, 2013 12:01 AM
So I did a little research into projections + operas. This is a really interesting article on the use of projects in Robert LePage's production of Wagner's Ring Cycle... While in this case the projections are by no means part of a production that is trying to save costs (quite the contrary actually), the use of them is quite fantastic.<br><br>At least for this author, they were incredibly effective and actually drew her into the performance. <br><br>Explains Smith: "It is in some ways simply old-fashioned stagecraft, but it is seamlessly fluid, happening before our eyes and, momentarily, breathtaking. Most of all it seems modern; unobtrusively it brings a touch of newness to a familiar art form. "<br>http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/14/arts/music/video-as-art-in-lepages-ring-at-the-metropolitan-opera.html
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Curtain Rises on New Act in Berlin's Opera Wars; Three Fiefs Must Learn How to Share, and to Live on Less - New York Times

From the start of the prolonged offstage drama that has been convulsing Berlin's opera world since the late 1990's, two inescapable and contradictory realities seemed likely to determine the
MAM_Music's insight:

Bianca: This article was published some time ago. However, I think it is an interesting example from Germany talking about mergers in the music sector: In 2004, the three opera houses in Berlin (Deutsche Oper, Komische Oper and Deutsche Staatsoper Unter den Linden) were merged into the "Berlin Opera Foundation".

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The Millennials’ Orchestra: The Challenges Facing U.S. Symphony Orchestras – Part 2

The Millennials’ Orchestra: The Challenges Facing U.S. Symphony Orchestras – Part 2 | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
Declining Demographics (Continued...) I am a 24-year-old self-proclaimed classical music lover and symphony orchestra enthusiast.  I have always wondered - why aren't there more people my age atten...
MAM_Music's insight:

Nicole: Insight coming...

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MAM Presenting's comment, November 23, 2013 3:49 PM
As you all have seen in class, I am pretty obsessed with the Millennial segment and feel the answers lie with them.<br><br>Moving on, in her latest post (same blog), "The Millennials’ Orchestra: From The Millennial’s Perspective," the author sent out a survey, distributed through social media, in an effort to determine "the current public sentiment around classical music and symphony orchestra performance in the 21st century and across the U.S."<br><br>The findings are definitely worth a look over:<br><br>"It appears that Millennials place greater value on relevance and appeal when making the decision to attend a symphony orchestra concert."<br><br>"Contrary to common belief, “expense” is not the biggest concern for Millennials when it comes to orchestra concerts."<br><br>It's all about the EXPERIENCE. <br><br>"With increasing reliance on social and handheld technology in our modern society, Engaging Art contributing authors highlight how the interests and expectations of contemporary audiences have changed, as well as the nature of arts participation." Couldn't have said it better myself, and completely believe the the above quoted statement.<br><br>How do we hone in on this knowledge to get our generation into these halls and performances? Last class's conversation on digital distribution comes to mind…
MAM Presenting's comment, November 23, 2013 3:51 PM
Above comment posted by Dan…SORRY for the horrific formatting of the comment - not the biggest fan of the user experience of the "comment" function.
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Brooklyn Philharmonic may face bankruptcy

Brooklyn Philharmonic may face bankruptcy | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
The struggling institution's board is seeking ways to keep the doors open such as finding a major cash infusion or a merger partner.
MAM_Music's insight:

This case demonstrates many of the issues that we discussed in class. The organization is facing the dual problem of decrease in charitable giving and attendance. They are having difficulty engaging new audiences with the context of the additional orchestra. In addition, their current audience base is moving to the suburbs as they age. The efforts made to engage new audiences through remixes and djs were initially successful but not followed up with similar efforts. Artistically the orchestra needs to work to change its conception of audience from passive listeners to an active community ready to engage. This, in conjunction with a complete financial overhaul, may save the Brooklyn Philharmonic. -Erin

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Apps come to music classroom in Quaker Valley school

Apps come to music classroom in Quaker Valley school | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
A music teacher at Edgeworth Elementary School in the Quaker Valley School District is starting a new kind of recycling program using iPod Touches and iPhones.
MAM_Music's insight:

Melody: Here is an article about a music teacher at an elementary school who is using music learning apps on ipod touches, ipads, and iphones to teach his music classes. Currently, the teacher has a few ipads and one ipod for the class, but he is also asking for donations of gently used ipods and iphones. With the devices, he resets them and adds many fun music learning apps so students can work in groups to learn. The apps his music class is using include Flashnote derby, Note Squish, Rhythm Cat, Blob Chorus, NoteWorks and Screen Chomp, which help students with note-reading skills, rhythmn, and ear training. Overall, I think it is a great idea to incorporate these apps because it is more interactive and fun for children; however, the only thing I worry about is that the children would use the devices to browse the Internet or play other games instead of just using the music apps.

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MAM Theater's comment, November 17, 2013 1:28 PM
I am so torn in my reaction to this article. On the one hand, I applaud the fact that this teacher (and others) recognizes what motivates students and is trying to "meet them where they are." And clearly, such initiatives get the kids engaged. By all standards, this is a good thing.<br><br>However, I can't help but feel that moves like this devalue the actual art. Technology is a great way to reach new audiences, but not necessarily when you're working with very young audiences to teach fundamental lessons. That is, when you are teaching the art itself, rather than just trying to attract people to view/hear the art, the emphasis needs to be different. It needs to be on the art, on the process of making the art, on the artists and the work and the craft. In this case, kids are being taught to associate music with technology, not learning to appreciate music for music's sake. As such, I worry that they would be less likely to want to go see a simple symphony that requires them to listen but not engage somehow. If too much emphasis is placed on technology at a young age, my fear is that the non-technological components will be devalued. (Jillian)
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Final curtains

Final curtains | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
“I WANT to blow you all. Blow you all. A kiss,” trilled Sarah Joy Miller (pictured, in a pink confection), who played the title role in “Anna Nicole”, a New...
MAM_Music's insight:

Melody: This article focuses on the management issues and problems of the New York City Opera. On October 1st, the 70 year old company decided that it is going to shut down due to significant financial problems. Interestingly, the company decided to do an “Anna Nicole” opera in order to reach a larger and broader audience. However, with financial mismanagement and decreasing support from donors, the company is now filing for bankruptcy. 

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MAM Theater's comment, November 11, 2013 12:01 AM
Same things happens in theater as well. The show Ann ends 1 month before its announced date due to the poor box office at Lincoln Center Theater this summer. It's a fun show, but summer is a heated arena, since everyone is fighting for audience. (Ying)
MAM Theater's comment, November 11, 2013 12:13 AM
I had a lot of sad feelings about NYC Opera closing, because it really was the People's Opera, as it was affectionately called. I'm worried that other emerging opera companies will see this closing as a result of poor programming choices (too many obscure works) and not as a result of poor financial management - the latter was the actual reason. It's easy to blame company failure on programming, especially when it's new and contemporary (due to this belief that audiences just want old favorites). I just hope that another company will carry on its artistic vision, but hopefully not its financial practices...
MAM Theater's comment, November 11, 2013 12:13 AM
(above comment was Caroline!)
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After The Mozart Effect: Music's Real Impact on the Brain

WQXR - New York Public Radio
MAM_Music's insight:

Katie: As we learn more about the neurological consequences of music-making, how might music organizations (orchestral or otherwise) adjust the programming and services they provide? Or should they? Is there a danger, as the article suggests in its closing sentences, in advocating music participation because of its neurological impact rather than its intrinsic values? Or is this an opportunity by which music organizations can better create public value for the communities they serve? Is there a balance?

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MAM Theater's comment, November 11, 2013 3:37 PM
I think, if anything, this is an opportunity. I think these two concepts, the neurological impact and intrinsic values, work together in supporting the need for music in the community and with children. I think it comes down to organizations truly understanding the community it works in - what is most important and the best "argument" for arts education? What will help you reach the most individuals? It is obvious (for us arts-minded individuals) to see the multiple benefits in arts education, so we have to be smart enough to use these arguments strategically, to meet the needs of our community. (Seth)
MAM_Music's comment, November 14, 2013 7:23 PM
This comes back to the tension that was presented in class between the intrinsic value argument and the utility that can be gained by using the myriad external benefits of the arts as persuasive arguments for their validity. The idealistic arts manager will tout the intrinsic value of the arts as the sole reasons for their continuance. While every arts manager knows that this is true, the realistic arts manager will recognize that the majority of society does not understand this value, and it may be advantageous to utilize alternative arguments for the importance of the arts, depending on the stubbornness of your audience. I believe that the utilitarian arguments for the arts (economic improvement, therapy, neurological health, etc.) ultimately only drive the intrinsic value argument home by allowing new individuals to buy in to the arts and ultimately discover their intrinsic value. (Erin)\
MAM Theater's comment, November 17, 2013 5:03 PM
Loved this article! It reminded me of another article I recently read -- I thought you might enjoy this as well (just another example of the good that music can do!) http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/nov/11/alzheimers-patients-brains-boosted-sound-music-singing (Jillian)
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Watch This Russian Police Choir Put Daft Punk To Shame

Watch This Russian Police Choir Put Daft Punk To Shame | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
Were you just beginning to forget the summer's most ubiquitous song, Daft Punk's "Get Lucky"? Well, the Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs' choir is here to make the song relevant once again.
MAM_Music's insight:

It is interesting to study the relationship between the arts and government among different countries. Music can be a powerful tool for government to disemminate ideas and opinions. Opressive regimes throughout history know this and have used it to their advantage, most often by constricting the voices of creative minds and promoting a "national channel" of arts making that is the property of the regime. Often, this only makes resistance through the arts stronger- consider the role of national songs and poems in resistance movements.

 

The United States was founded to escape this opression, and the resistance  to a central cultural ministry is founded on fear that national involvement in the creative capital would restrict American liberty, restricting the free and independent voice of the American people. On the other hand, Russia has a history of highly centralized government, which informs its contemporary relationship between music and government. Government control of the arts, whether good or bad, is more accepted in Russia because the country's history and culture supports this structure. This comparison illustrates how a country, province, or state's unique culture and history profoundly affect the voice of the arts. -Erin

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Naptime brings the toughest crowd for New York Philharmonic's Very Young People's Concerts.

Naptime brings the toughest crowd for New York Philharmonic's Very Young People's Concerts. | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
New York Philharmonic's Very Young People's Concerts use childlike humor to cater to toddler set. An interview with Dorian Rence and Rebecca Young.
MAM_Music's insight:

Melody:

The article relates to music education programs for toddlers. The New York Philharmonic’s Very Young People’s concerts, developed by New York Philharmonic musicians with faculty of Columbia University’s Teacher’s College, provide fun concert experiences for toddlers. Each concert is centered around the stories of Philippe, a cartoon penguin character. When the musicians are playing, there is a projector screen behind them, which displays Philippe’s journeys, and in different parts of the performance, there is a narrator who is sitting on a rocking chair while telling Philippe’s stories. Some of the music they have used for their performances include Ravel’s Mother Goose Suite, Bernstein’s on The Town, and John Cage’s Second Construction  (http://nyphil.org/education/for-kids-and-teens/very-young-peoples-concerts).

 

This program also reminded me of when I was little, my mom would bring me to see the Akron Symphony’s Peter and the Wolf and as a kid, I loved the combination of storytelling and the music. It was also fun to be there with other kids my age and to participate in the interactive storytelling. Overall, I think these concerts are a wonderful way to introduce young children to different instruments and classical music.

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Zachary Woolfe Sees the Met’s ‘Norma’ From 9 Perspectives

Zachary Woolfe Sees the Met’s ‘Norma’ From 9 Perspectives | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
A reviewer attends nine performances of Bellini’s “Norma,” to compare different seating spots at the Met.
MAM_Music's insight:

Melody: This article reminded me about some of the discussions we had in class about how watching a performance of an opera on your TV or on your computer could be better than watching it live in some situations. For live performances, only people who have seats closer to the stage are usually the ones who are able to clearly see the performer’s face and expressions.

 

Anyways, this article is about the writer of the article who saw 9 performances of the Metropolitan Opera’s “Norma.” For each performance, the writer sat in a different seat. Some of the seats include the Grand Tier ($220), standing room at top of theater ($17), Dress Circle ($190), front row of the orchestra ($220), prime orchestra seat on the aisle ($310), floor seat ($100), Score Desk seat at the very top and sides of the theater ($12). He concluded that the floor seats are not always the best because he sat in one near two of the technical booths. Also, from the Score Desk seats, you can’t see the stage.

 

It was interesting to learn about the writer’s experiences from sitting in different seats at the Met and it made me ponder more about the benefits of technology and recorded performances shown on TV or the Internet.

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MAM Theater's comment, December 3, 2013 11:57 AM
I found this article fascinating, mostly because I love seeing a show again from a different section. I was intrigued by his thoughts on the Score Desk seats, and how following along with the score elevated his experience. I find it fascinating that the Met offers such an opportunity - cheap seats where excited musicians can read and listen along - and I wonder who else has taken advantage of this. It seems like a great way to engage young musicians and get them into the space. (Caroline)
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Classical music: Turmoil at Dallas Chamber Music Society

Classical music: Turmoil at Dallas Chamber Music Society | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
The 58-year-old organization is without an artistic or executive director.
MAM_Music's insight:

Melody: Currently, the Dallas Chamber Music Society is run by the commitee/board because the executive director and artistic director left. The organization had approached someone to be the artistic director, but some complained that the person didn't know how to handle administrative duties. Also, the current president, who was vice president, became president because the board had a disagreement with the former president. So the current president says he is busy now, but isn't worried about the Dallas Chamber Music Society and knows that in the long run, the organization will need to find an executive director who is good at fundraising. It will be interesting to see what happens in the future and how not having an executive and artisitic director will impact the overall organization. It will also be interesing to see organizational structure changes and changes in duties.

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The DeVos Institute of Arts Management to Relocate to the University of Maryland

The DeVos Institute of Arts Management to Relocate to the University of Maryland | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
Leading Arts Administrator Michael M. Kaiser to Join UMD as Professor of the Practice
COLLEGE PARK, Md., Nov.
MAM_Music's insight:

Michael Kaiser's DeVos Institute of Arts Management at the Kennedy Center is moving to the University of Maryland.  This new partnership will be a significant change for both the institute and the Kennedy Center.  The institute runs under the umbrella of the Kennedy Center and essentially doesn't have to worry about the overhead costs of a legal department, printing services, press, and so forth.  (Having the Kennedy Center name doesn't hurt either.)  However, Michael Kaiser's reasoning for the move is to expand their scope and grow as an arts services organization.  Moving to a university setting will give them access to a number of resources unavailable at the Kennedy Center, such as faculty.  It is unclear whether Michael Kaiser plans to start up a master's program or just offer a certificate to the graduates in their 3-year fellowship program.  Offering a master's program seems to conflict with another arts management program in the region (AU), and will surely affect the collaboration AU has with arts organizations in the district.  On the other hand, this is a great opportunity for the University of Maryland to grow and broaden their reach in the arts.

 For any organization to make such a large change, turnover seems inevitable. Our guest speaker, Michael Mael, mentioned having almost zero turnover during their transition to the Kennedy Center, which is rare.   It will be interesting to see further news on how staff at the DeVos Institute will transition to Maryland. -KN
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The world's first INFLATABLE concert hall arrives in Japan

The world's first INFLATABLE concert hall arrives in Japan | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
British sculptor Anish Kapoor and Japanese architect Arata Isozaki created the Ark Nova structure which, when fully inflated, has room for about 500 guests.
MAM_Music's insight:

This is a very interesting method of making the arts more accesible to everyone. The structure, which in itself is a work of art, can be deflated and transported with relative ease. This hall allows people in remote areas to have an arts experience that is normally reserved for more metropolitan areas. As discussed in class, in recent years more companies have been touring with the hope of expanding outreach and gaining new audiences. As the structures of arts organizations and performing arts groups shift in the current unpredictable climate, I wonder if there will be a return to an arts model that primarily emphasizes touring? -Erin

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Alex Ross: The Minnesota Orchestra Cancels, and Hilary Hahn Performs

Alex Ross: The Minnesota Orchestra Cancels, and Hilary Hahn Performs | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
The swift plunge of the Minnesota Orchestra, which recently cancelled a pair of concerts at Carnegie Hall because of a labor dispute, looks to be one of the most flagrant cases of mismanagement in the recent history of American classical music.
MAM_Music's insight:

The writer definitely has an opinion as to who is at fault in the Minnesota case, but admits that the system is broken. Though I don't think that anyone could actually deny that at this point, Ross offers a different solution- contemporary music.

 

Even champions of contemporary classical music will acknowledge that they are some of the most poorly attended pieces of repertoire in the classical setting. I find it counter-intuitive on the surface, but with a little thought, could be a viable option.

 

In the process of moving to a new artistic model, the orchestras and operas of the world take the risk of alienating their current audiences, but this is the same audience that is ageing out anyway. The hope is that they would begin to build younger, more open audiences for the future of the organization.

 

So, do orchestras cut their losses and place a larger focus on contemporary music? We shall see. -LMSanBoeuf

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MAM_Music's comment, November 22, 2013 8:43 AM
Programming more contemporary classical music will present a unique challenge for orchestras, who rely so heavily on support from older patrons. Many people believe that the choice between engaging the young and keeping the interest of the old are difficult to reconcile. I think that in order to shift to more contemporary classical music programming, the onus will be on the marketing team to present the offering in such a way that is exciting to all ages. An article I scooped a few weeks ago discussed how older audiences in the UK were identifying with contemporary dance because inside, they still felt like they were young. Maybe in the case of orchestral programming and marketing, contemporary classical music could be subtly presented in a fashion that envokes feelings of youthfulness and hope among the older patrons. -Erin
MAM Presenting's comment, November 24, 2013 11:53 PM
Erin - that is a really interesting and compelling argument. I think it is a matter of convincing both the organizations and the audiences that contemporary classical music is not an inferior option to traditional classical music, which seems to be a common conception. Perhaps by introducing contemporary classical music alongside safer, more traditional classical music, hesitant audiences could be slowly introduced to the beauty and interest that exists in the more contemporary options. - Marissa
MAM_Music's comment, November 25, 2013 3:00 PM
Katie: What struck me about Ross's article was not so much an argument for contemporary music specifically, but for "the loose, lively atmosphere of the mini-festival." It seems that classical music performances are aching for a burst of vitality, which may not have as much to do with specifically what repertoire is performed but the environment in which it is presented. Ross closes by saying, "It felt as though we were ready to begin again, in the present tense." It's that "present tense" that seems to be key. Live performance should be dynamic, alive, exciting...like the air of a "mini-festival." We don't really know if younger audiences have any more affinity for contemporary music than older audiences (or vice versa), but we do seem to keep reading and hearing anecdotally that audiences are craving a personal, relevant experience. Perhaps what Hahn successfully accomplished, and what Ross reacted to here, was an intimate and electric performance experience.
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Dispatch from Canada: Toronto Symphony Orchestra strikes gold with the kids

Dispatch from Canada: Toronto Symphony Orchestra strikes gold with the kids | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
The Toronto Symphony Orchestra faced near-bankruptcy in 1995 and 2001, a major labor dispute in 1999, half-full halls, crippling debt, and a CEO and conductor who jumped ship, yet it has come out the other side in great shape.
MAM_Music's insight:

Nicole: Insight coming...

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MAMDance's curator insight, November 18, 2013 10:29 PM

KF: Thanks Nicole for posting this positive article about arts organizations reaching younger audiences and succeeding.  I wonder what programs like the Toronto Symphony's 18-35 year old $14 "tsoundcheck" program exist in the dance world?  I particulary liked one of the patron's comments: "'It’s the same prices as the movies and it’s more of an outing and it’s cultural.'"  The Symphony took out price from the equation and specifically catered their programs (time and price) to fit with younger audiences, and it worked.

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Could it be that some art institutions deserve to fail? @TerryTeachout discusses

Could it be that some art institutions deserve to fail? @TerryTeachout discusses | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
High-culture attendance numbers have been shrinking for more than a decade. Even the New York City Opera wasn't too big to fail. But here's a thought: Could it be that some of these institutions should disappear?
MAM_Music's insight:

Part of this article raises the question of whether we have too many orchestras and opera companies, further emphasizing the Salzburg Seminar's study that we're in a golden age of cultural participation.  The article also points out that orchestras, theaters, and operas are competing with digital downloading, cable television, and closed-circuit simulcasts.  As we discussed in class, new technologies are becoming the alternate form of entertainment for our audiences.  But I don't think arts organizations should dismiss new technology so quickly, and some organizations are actually embracing new technology in a very creative way.  The Seattle Opera and San Francisco Ballet come to mind., and they are utilizing technology around their community and constituents.  I think this idea could also be transferred to their organizational structure.  The Oakland Museum of California, for instance, completely restructured their staffing, also centering on the needs of the community.

-Kimmy

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SMU’s Major New National Arts Report: What Does Arts Leadership Do? | Art&Seek

SMU’s Major New National Arts Report: What Does Arts Leadership Do? | Art&Seek | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
SMU launched its National Center for Arts Research earlier this year. Now NCAR is previewing its first major study on the condition of American cultural groups - and what they can do to improve their outlook.
MAM_Music's insight:

Katie: As we think about strategy and analysis for performing arts, a powerful resource from SMU's relatively new resource from the National Center for Arts Research (NCAR). The nonprofit sector, particularly the arts, requires a unique set of success indicators to determine performance and progress. Here NCAR considers both the constraints and the purpose of nonprofits arts organizations to come up with relevant metrics for our field, including easily measurable items like attendance and sponsorship dollars, to less quantifiable factors like strength of relationship with neighborhoods served. Among the (perhaps) less expected findings is that younger audiences for performing arts is actually growing. Make sure to check out the list of other "surprises" at the bottom--food for thought!

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MAMDance's comment, November 16, 2013 3:39 PM
There are some really interesting results in this study, quite a few of which tie perfectly into our conversations surrounding how the role of large institutions vs. smaller, community based organizations will continue to change in the future.
MAMDance's comment, November 16, 2013 3:39 PM
above comment from Allison...
MAM Presenting's comment, November 18, 2013 12:06 AM
It's interesting to read the surprising parts of the results. The fact that big cities have positive effect on revenue but suppress audience engagement relates to the class discussion about how technologies affect arts. The conclusions are similar, when people have more options for leisure time, they spend less on arts. ——Su
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Questions for the Future of the Arts

Questions for the Future of the Arts | Business Models and Management Issues: Music | Scoop.it
Are we witnessing a major transition in the arts from regional organizations to fewer mega-organizations with the sophistication to mount large scale productions, to market them well and to raise large sums of money?

Via MAM Presenting, MAMDance
MAM_Music's insight:

Katie: Originally posted by Marissa (MAM Presenting) and rescooped by Kathleen (MAM Dance), Michael Kaiser poses a series of provocative questions on the impact that delivering artistic performance via multiple platforms will have on live performance, and particularly on mid-sized (regional) arts organizations. The tone of the piece is rather dire, and it seems, overly so. The fact that multiple arts organizations are utilizing non-standard modes of distribution (simulcasts, etc.) presents just as much opportunity as risk. Yes, a fear exists that people will stop attending live performances, leaving only a handful of "mega-organizations" to deliver content and by consequence allowing a relative few to attend live performances while the majority stream them in. But it also means that artistic performances now have the potential to reach more people than ever before, exposing (in theory) greater portions of the populace to artistic creations that may or may not be familiar via modes that are relevant to them. Taking the long view, this change may just as well increase interest in artistic performance, motivating people to donate and/or attend regional organizations. The future, of course, remains to be seen but can be anticipated with fear or curiousity, as an opportunity that might hurt the arts or that just might help them.

 

Side note: AMTLab contributor Ashley Mac is currently conducting exciting original research on this very topic. You can check it out here: http://amt-lab.org/blog/2013/10/research-update-from-simulcast-audience-to-live-audience

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MAM Presenting's curator insight, November 8, 2013 4:53 PM

In this article, Michael Kaiser, President of the Kennedy Center, presents a number of questions about the future of arts organizations in light of the trend to broadcast performances.

 

Kaiser proposes a number of thought-provoking questions. However, I think the most jarring part of this article is that as more major organizations jump on the broadcasting bandwagon – just yesterday the Stratford Shakespeare Festival announced it will be the first North American theatre company to film their productions for worldwide distribution) – even an arts manager who has been dubbed “the Turnaround King” is truly concerned that these broadcasts may have dire consequences for arts organizations and the artistic product across the US.

 

What, then, does this mean for presenting organizations in particular?

 

As this technology advances and becomes cheaper, what motivation will there be arts organizations to tour? Will presenting organizations begin to incorporate movie theatres in their complexes? Or, perhaps, will the movie theatre become the presenter?

 

- Marissa

MAMDance's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:22 PM

KF. An interesting article from Michael Kaiser posted by Marissa.  It's interesting to ponder these questions with a dance lens.  Already, two ballet companies have created reality/documentary tv programs.  Is broadcasting across the country with full performances the next step?  Although, public television and stations like Ovation do broadcast ballets to millions of homes.  If larger dance companies start growing their audience in the national market, will smaller, regional dance companies suffer?  I hope that won't happen, but it's definitely something to ponder. 

Brett.Ashley.Crawford's comment, November 11, 2013 8:32 PM
preview for this week :-)
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Symphony Fall13

League of American Orchestras
MAM_Music's insight:

There is an interesting article beginning on page 14 about the "ingredients for a successful negotiation." They cite the biggest issue in negotation to be distrust between the parites.

 

Positive relationships that begin BEFORE and endure though the negotiate process are crucial to successful negotations. 

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MAM Presenting's comment, November 11, 2013 11:21 PM
I think the idea of "distrust" also points to the lack of meaningful communication and understanding that exists between management and artists. It is vital that the two negotiating parties understand the priorities, and reasons for those priorities, of the opposing side. Even if positive relationships were not established prior to the negotiations, I think actively working to improve lines of communication can help rid the two parties of their distrust of the other - Marissa