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Mindfulness and Neural Integration: Daniel Siegel, MD at TEDxStudioCityED

Daniel Siegel, MD, is Clinical Professor of psychiatry at UCLA, Co-Director of Mindful Awareness Research Center, Executive Director of Mindsight Institute, author, and recipient of numerous awards and honorary fellowships.

This talk examines how relationships and reflection support the development of resilience in children and serve as the basic '3 R's" of a new internal education of the mind.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Carla Chapman's insight:

Does emotional and social intelligence impact attention? I believe it does.  Watch this brief and eye opening video to see if you agree. 

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Dr. Amy Fuller's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:38 PM

Very informative explaination of the brain and how it works to help us manage ourselves. 

John Threadgold's comment, September 8, 2013 5:17 PM
very good video indeed. I offer a combination of Mindfulness and Focusing-Oriented Therapy to my clients, and those who embrace it, recover !
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Rescooped by Carla Chapman from Influence Marketing Strategy
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12 Intentional Ways to Engage Social Media Followers

12 Intentional Ways to Engage Social Media Followers | Attention | Scoop.it
In her recent webinar, Katie Lance discussed how to engage social media followers and influencers more productively by taking an intentional approach.

Via Ron Sela
Carla Chapman's insight:

An intentional approach in engaging social media followers. :)

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Ron Sela's curator insight, September 16, 2013 10:42 PM

12 Intentional Ways to Engage Social Media Followers

Rescooped by Carla Chapman from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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When Everyone is Tweeting, Who is Paying Attention?

When Everyone is Tweeting, Who is Paying Attention? | Attention | Scoop.it

Food for thought from Toddi Gutner for Business2Community:


I found this piece particularly interesting and wanted to call your attention to it. It's one of those things we all experience everyday, but do we really stop to ask ourselves this question:


****Are You Mobilizing Communities or Just a Voice in the Crowd?


I've personally covered events online, tweeting the main points live and although I was able to filter and capture the essence of what was going on, I had to go back and really absorb the information and then try to apply it to my business effectively. (not always an easy task) :-)


It's a juggling act but one I think we're all experiencing on one level or another.


Excerpt:


Continuous Partial Attention (CPA) is the process of paying simultaneous but superficial attention to a number of sources of incoming information.


This term, coined by writer and consultant Linda Stone in 1998, aptly describes the scene at the recent Council of Public Relations Firms Critical Issues Forum on Social Revolution:


This is what particularly caught my attention:


**What was the unintended consequence (UC) - these being outcomes that are not intended by a purposeful action?


**They can be positive, negative or have a perverse effect contrary to what was originally intended.



****So are there any unintended consequences to compulsively tweeting from an event or otherwise?


This is a question I have yet to answer. It is sort of like waiting to see what the side effects of a drug will be years after it has been approved.


One UC of CPA may be that peoples’ attention spans (already truncated by USA Today and sound bite television) and


**related ability for analytic thought will be reduced to nanoseconds.


I'd love to hear your Thoughts?


Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Media and Beyond"


Read the full article: [http://bit.ly/vNC1cn]


Via janlgordon
Carla Chapman's insight:

Are there unintended consequences for compulsively tweeting?  Read on....

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Beth Kanter's comment, November 28, 2011 3:20 PM
I just rescooped this article because I found it in another source, but here I look further into your collection and find it. I'm curating on the topic information overload and coping skills. I believe that curation can help you pay attention. I experienced this myself .. I was a conference. Many people were tweeting. I was tracking it with storify - doing content curation in real time with twitter versus tweeting helped me pay attention, quickly put together a coherrent record of what happened and make it unstandable to people not in the room.
janlgordon's comment, November 28, 2011 3:59 PM
@BethKanter
I have covered a few conferences in real-time and it definitely makes you pay attention on more than one level. Being able to put it in a cohesive manner helping people understand what's happening is an art in itself and something you do very well.
Rescooped by Carla Chapman from Digital Media: Fight, Flight or Breathe?
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"Email Apnea" by Linda Stone, Wisdom 2.0 Conference

This is ""Email Apnea" by Linda Stone, Wisdom 2.0 Conference" by Wisdom 2 Conference on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them.

Via Meg Coffee
Carla Chapman's insight:

Linda Stone shares her insight about email apnea.  Take a look and listen.

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Meg Coffee's curator insight, August 21, 2014 7:31 PM

4. In Linda Stone’s interesting input at a conference, she again covers the issue of Email Apnea.  She describes email apnea and informs the audience of how to recognize and self-diagnose Email Apnea. She covers; how to become aware of the issue, how long term practice effects the body and her opinion of a solution for the problem.  She also outlines the results from her observations and interviews she has conducted.

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After-school fitness may improve classroom performance - WKRC TV Cincinnati

WKRC TV Cincinnati After-school fitness may improve classroom performance WKRC TV Cincinnati They had increased levels of "attentional inhibition," which is the ability to block out distractions and focus, as well as "cognitive flexibility," the...
Carla Chapman's insight:

Attention and physical activity.  How do they relate?

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Rescooped by Carla Chapman from MOVIES VIDEOS & PICS
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'Can You Say...Hero?' A Profile of Mr. Rogers

'Can You Say...Hero?' A Profile of Mr. Rogers | Attention | Scoop.it
Fred Rogers has been doing the same small good thing for a very long time...

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
Carla Chapman's insight:

To me, this man was the epitome of clear intention and attention.  Go back and watch some episodes to see what I see.  #redefining cool

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Rescooped by Carla Chapman from Unplug
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Love & Awareness As the Heart of Mindfulness

Love & Awareness As the Heart of Mindfulness | Attention | Scoop.it
I recently attended Omega NYC’s “The Neuroscience of Well-Being, Mindfulness & Love” workshop at the New York Society for Ethical Culture.

Via J Ruth Kelly
Carla Chapman's insight:

Is this about science, spirituality or both?  Gain some insight on mindfulness and breath from a neuroscience perspective and see how you can apply it to attention.

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J Ruth Kelly's comment, November 27, 2013 2:55 PM
thanks for the shares...
Luz Ballesteros-Andrade's curator insight, March 21, 2015 10:13 PM

Love is the most important element to be successful.

 

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TEDxWilliamsport - Dr. Derek Cabrera - How Thinking Works

Dr. Derek Cabrera is an internationally recognized expert in metacognition (thinking about thinking), epistemology (the study of knowledge), human and organi...
Carla Chapman's insight:

Are our students getting to college with the inability to "think"?  Metacognition...thinking about thinking.  Metacognition expert, Dr. Cabrera speaks about the concerns of traditional education and how it is not preparing our youth with the common sense skills to prepare them for real life.

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Is ‘mindfulness’ just another management fad?

Is ‘mindfulness’ just another management fad? | Attention | Scoop.it
Google, Apple, McKinsey, and Goldman Sachs are among its many corporate fans. (RT @FortuneMagazine: Is 'mindfulness' just another management fad?
Carla Chapman's insight:

Are you skeptical about mindfulness?  Big tech companies are advocates...Read why they think it's a critical part of attention and productivity.

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The Power of Intention - Super Soul Sunday - Oprah Winfrey Network

It's the principle that rules every part of Oprah's life—and cured her disease to please. Find out why author Gary Zukav says intention is at the heart of ow...
Carla Chapman's insight:

Howard Rheingold says that "intention is the fuel for attention".  This is a short video about the power of intention. 

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Rescooped by Carla Chapman from The 21st Century
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How the Science of Attention is Changing Work and Education

How the Science of Attention is Changing Work and Education | Attention | Scoop.it

As long as we focus on the object we know, we will miss the new one we need to see. The process of unlearning in order to relearn demands a new concept of knowledge not as thing but as a process, not as a noun but as a verb.” ~ Cathy Davidson


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Carla Chapman's insight:

Training our youth for the new world that is emerging is imperative.  Cathy Davidson understands and talks about the concept of unlearning to relearn in this new day and age.

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selective attention test

The original, world-famous awareness test from Daniel Simons and Christopher Chabris. Check out our book and website for more information (www.theinvisiblego...
Carla Chapman's insight:

This video is a great example of what Cathy Davidson speaks about in "The Myth of Monotasking".  Cathy speaks about our attention blindness and how we must focus on what we see and what we don't see.  When we are engaged in "attention blindness", our attention is such that we don't see or we actually exclude the unexpected. 

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Rescooped by Carla Chapman from Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path
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Ready to Learn? The Key Is Listening With Intention

Ready to Learn? The Key Is Listening With Intention | Attention | Scoop.it
Listening and observing can be passive activities—in one ear and out the other, as our mothers used to say. Or they can be rich, active, intense experiences that lead to serious learning.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Carla Chapman's insight:

Don't be a passive listener, be an intentional listener!

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Mindfulness: an antidote for workplace ADD

Mindfulness: an antidote for workplace ADD | Attention | Scoop.it
Some consultants tell me that the number one problem in the workplace today is attention. People are distracted. They're in a state of what's called "continuous partial attention" where

Via Anne Egros
Carla Chapman's insight:

Are you ever in a state of continuous partial attention?  Read here to have a deeper understanding of how to combat this.

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Anne Egros's curator insight, February 7, 2013 1:01 PM

It takes more and more energy to focus due to the increase in speed and amount of information we receive everyday. Unlesss you live in a cave or an island without connnection, distraction is unavoidable. 

 

Even if we are very good at practicing mindfullness meditation, it is like a red light. it works to stop you in the moment...until the ligh turns green again.

 

I am always annoyed when people use the term "ADD" to describe a lack of concentration. Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a medical disorder describe in the DSM IV book. It is described as a neurological condition or a kind of immaturity of the brain, that can be corrected with medication mostly stimulants. Medication is only working when you take it. When you stop you still have ADD and its symptoms come back right away. That is the only common thing between meditation and medication !

 

 

Rescooped by Carla Chapman from Health & Life Extension
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Your Brain on Yoga: The Complete Breath - US News

Your Brain on Yoga: The Complete Breath - US News | Attention | Scoop.it

When most of us breathe, we employ shallow chest breathing. This looks like holding the belly relatively still while the sternum lifts, and it feels like only the upper lungs exchange air. If you place one hand on your chest and one on the belly, see which one moves first. If the upper hand moves first, that is shallow chest breathing. Conversely, the Complete Breath makes use of the full capacity we have to breathe. The mechanism of the Complete Breath has four components: pelvic, abdominal, thoracic and clavicular. To start, relax your abdomen like you're holding a basketball inside it. Feel that it is expanding forwards, sideways and even backwards into the kidneys and adrenal glands. Then gently let the belly open downwards and relax the pelvic floor, almost as if you are releasing the bladder to urinate. When you inhale, the breath should similarly relax the pelvic floor downwards and the abdominal area in all directions. Once the belly fills on inhalation, let the rib cage, chest and shoulder blades expand passively as the breath fills that area, feeling as if there is another basketball there. Once the thoracic (chest) area fills, allow the clavicles (collar bones) and shoulders to naturally lift and feel as if they are expanding outwards. All of the above – pelvic, abdominal, thoracic and clavicular expansion – filling up in order upon inhalation and emptying in reverse order upon exhalation, all with smooth even breaths, together comprise the physical mechanism of the Complete Breath. 

 

When consciously breathing in this way, we affect control over physiological mechanisms that directly correlate with physical, mental and emotional health. The vagus nerve, which runs from the brain down through the viscera/organs, is intimately modulated by the breath. This nerve regulates autonomic physiological functions such as heart rate, respiration, digestion and immune response. The responsiveness of heart rate to changes in respiration, termed respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), is directly linked with the vagus nerve, and 'vagal tone' is often used as an index of the whole state of the parasympathetic nervous system, for the readiness with which we can calm the body's stress responses. On the micro level, inhalation increases heart rate and decreases vagal tone, and exhalation decreases heart rate and increases vagal tone. Therefore, performing a 1:2 breath ratio (exhaling twice as long as the inhalation) can result in a greater sense of relaxation. On a macro physiological level, greater vagal tone is associated with vasodilation, decreased inflammatory responses, and decreased circulation of stress hormones. Moreover, studies have demonstrated a direct correlation between loving-kindness meditation, superior emotional regulation, positive social behavior, and a decrease in headaches, chest pains, congestion and weakness. 

 

Learning and practicing the Complete Breath helped me to progressively feel more relaxed, open and aware, and it increased conscious performance in many areas and activities. It also served as the basic training to control physiological responses and provided experiential proof that conscious attention can alter bodily processes. Experiencing this principle along with feeling the scientifically demonstrated biological effects served as the jumping board for more advanced practices that improve bone health, neuroendocrine functionality, cognitive stability and strength, sexual vitality, intuitive ability, and much more. 

In addition to the physical benefits above, as well as massaging the internal organs, breathing in this way – when applied to any activity, physical or otherwise – also increases the awareness of subtleties that the mind may otherwise not notice due to habitually higher immune and stress defenses. Both of these are correlated with the lower vagal tone experienced most of the time by the majority of people, in which the mind's scope is dialed into a more gross/solid physical state of awareness. After learning the physical mechanism of the breath, being able to perform it automatically and joining the components so that it occurs in a fluid manner, the next step is to open up the nervous system to greater subtle awareness. By increasing and sustaining the resolution (fineness) of attention, the nerves increase their connective strength, capacitance and sensitivity. Feel the interconnection between the air outside of the body and the air inside of it. Become aware of the larger system of respiratory exchange within you and in all of nature. Feel the ionic charge of the air around you and that electricity continuing in through your body. Play with carrying this conscious, smooth full breathing into daily activities such as eating, showering, thinking and exercising. Play with combining it with these four-dimensional breathing exercises. It can also be coupled with sound and mantra by inhaling and exhaling the subtle sensations of sound. Observe the differences in sensation and experience over time, and continue playing. 

 

Without the Complete Breath, I would probably still be struggling to find a sense of inner calm and steadiness of mind, two invaluable factors for a healthy body, mind and spirit – and certainly necessary for further progress on any serious path that cultivates higher human potential. It is a prime example of how yogic tools are designed as technologies for improved health and wellness. The breath is a gateway that can, with conscious attention and intention, unite the physical with the subtle, the outer world with the inner world, the physiological with the psychological, movement with stillness and the mundane with the spiritual. 


Via Tonya Scholz
Carla Chapman's insight:

You might like your brain better on Yoga!

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Rescooped by Carla Chapman from Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
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The Emerging Mind: How relationships and the embodied brain shape who we are

Renowned academic, author, and director of the Mindsight Institute Dan Siegel, visits the RSA to reveal an extremely rare thing -- a working definition of the mind.


Via Xaos, Maggie Rouman
Carla Chapman's insight:

Do we have a good working definition of the mind?  If we don't, how can our educators reach our youth effectively?  Does the lack of a definition paralyze our teachers from developing students minds?  And how does this affect attention?

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Rescooped by Carla Chapman from Counselling Update
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Mindfulness and Neural Integration: Daniel Siegel, MD at TEDxStudioCityED

Daniel Siegel, MD, is Clinical Professor of psychiatry at UCLA, Co-Director of Mindful Awareness Research Center, Executive Director of Mindsight Institute, author, and recipient of numerous awards and honorary fellowships.

This talk examines how relationships and reflection support the development of resilience in children and serve as the basic '3 R's" of a new internal education of the mind.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* 


Via Dimitris Tsantaris
Carla Chapman's insight:

Does emotional and social intelligence impact attention? I believe it does.  Watch this brief and eye opening video to see if you agree. 

more...
Dr. Amy Fuller's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:38 PM

Very informative explaination of the brain and how it works to help us manage ourselves. 

John Threadgold's comment, September 8, 2013 5:17 PM
very good video indeed. I offer a combination of Mindfulness and Focusing-Oriented Therapy to my clients, and those who embrace it, recover !
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Michael Silver wicn Lecture. How attention effects what you see

How attention effects what you seeBangor UniversityJuly 27, 2011. Michael Silver Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute School of Optometry University of Califor...
Carla Chapman's insight:

How does attention facilitate perception?  Listen and watch Michael Silver from UC Berkley.

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Rescooped by Carla Chapman from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Neuroplasticity: Your Brain’s Amazing Ability to Form New Habits

Neuroplasticity: Your Brain’s Amazing Ability to Form New Habits | Attention | Scoop.it

In many ways, neuroplasticity is what makes personal growth and development possible at its most basic level.  With the understanding that change is indeed possible, you’re able to focus on the ways in which you’d like to grow instead of whether or not it’s achievable for you.  It’s possible, it’s proven, and now it’s up to you!


We are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. ~ Aristotle


Via The Learning Factor
Carla Chapman's insight:

Many attention experts believe that attention can and should be trained.  The brain has the ability to reconfigure itself. Neuroplasticity!

 

We are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. ~ Aristotle

 

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Ulrike Weissenbacher's curator insight, September 11, 2014 8:22 AM

Nous utilisons cette capacité du cerveau à se modifier dans les approches de la psychologie énergétique, permettant ainsi de créer de nouvelles voies neuronales. Il est ainsi possible de libérer les voies qui ont été liés à des expériences traumatiques, au stress, et à d'anciens schemas de penser et de ressentir.

Vous pouvez recabler votre cerveau pour retourner d'une facon de penser et d'agir qui est basé sur la souffrance et la peur, vers un version de vous-meme plus spontané, confiante et heureuse.
Ceci vous permet de retrouver le "moi" que vous semblez ne jamais avoir connu, ou que vous semblez avoir perdu à un moment donné.

Karlton B McIver's curator insight, August 6, 2015 4:07 PM

One of the most popular areas of research in psychology these days is neuroplasticity. Neuroplasticity refers to the brain’s ability to restructure itself after training or practice. 

Shah Zamri's curator insight, May 23, 2016 9:24 AM

We are what we repeatedly do.  Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. ~ Aristotle

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Mindfulness Exercises for Kids

Mindfulness Exercises for Kids | Attention | Scoop.it
I was recently asked the question, (Mindfulness Exercises for Kids http://t.co/jb2uYYxJlE)
Carla Chapman's insight:

Since we know that mindfulness improves attention, we need to start with the younger generation and begin with exercising their minds around this topic.  Mindfulness expert, Alfred James, can get kids started.  A great tool for parents to help develop our up and coming generation.

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The art of staying focused in a distracting world

The art of staying focused in a distracting world | Attention | Scoop.it

The tech-industry veteran Linda Stone on how to pay attention.

Carla Chapman's insight:

A great article with Linda Stone who coined the phrase "continuous partial attention".  She has worked with great tech companies such as Apple and Microsoft and is highly regarded on the topic of attention.

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Net Smart: How to Thrive Online by Howard Rheingold A TTW Guest ...

Net Smart: How to Thrive Online by Howard Rheingold A TTW Guest ... | Attention | Scoop.it
Until I read Net Smart: How to Thrive Online, I thought its author, Howard Rheingold, was a cheerleader. He is often credited with inventing the term “virtual community,” was advocating for the power of computer networks to ...
Carla Chapman's insight:

This is a mindmap that represents how important that being mindful is while navigating our way online.  Training our attention can make us more effective in reaching our online goals.

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