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Is post production bad? | Matthew Maddock

Is post production bad? |  Matthew Maddock | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it


I am going to write a series of short articles about some of the post production techniques I use, but as part of that I thought I’d start off with a debate on the use of post production in general. Is post production bad?  The argument will run and run that’s for sure.  It’s between the people who think that to be a good photographer you have to get it all exactly right in your camera, and in the extreme, those people who think that you have a free reign to process the hell out of RAW file! I guess I sit somewhere in the middle of the debate.  I’m not into processing an image to death – to start with I’m not skilled enough!  I have a huge respect for people who have this skill and can make an image look fantastic (without being obvious) in post production.  I like to get as much right in-camera as I can, but I don’t have a problem doing some editing and manipulation if I feel it improves the image, and I will often shoot with the post-production ideas already in my mind. When you shoot video it is generally clear to people/clients that you have to spend time away from the location editing the video, but when shooting stills a lot of clients think that you press the button and then just send them the image.  It isn’t apparent that editing stills is as much a part of modern photography as actually being on site taking the images.  It is a process than can take as much of your time (sometimes more) than you do actually shooting the images. I used to shoot film, I used to develop film, and I used to do my own prints.  Any photographer who shot film and cared about their work didn’t go to a high street print shop to get their prints done!  They often didn’t even do it themselves, they used professional printers and developers – much like today’s professional retouchers, these professionals knew what to do to get the best out of an image and would employ ‘post production’ techniques to do that......


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Michael Petersen's insight:

Post production is essentisial all images are minipulated, first by the existing light,then by the camera and lastly by the photographer

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David Hellard's comment, November 14, 2013 11:32 AM
Looking forward to those articles, Thomas. The accompanying photograph is lovely.
Thomas Menk's comment, November 14, 2013 12:46 PM
Thx David :-)
Michael Petersen photography
Professional Photography,Weddings,Family Photos
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The Photobook: A History Volume III, Martin Parr and Gerry Badger - Collector Daily

The Photobook: A History Volume III, Martin Parr and Gerry Badger - Collector Daily | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it

Of making many books about photobooks there is no end, or so it has seemed in the last decade. Since the turn of the millennium, new histories on this formerly arcane topic have appeared almost every year.


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Mario Pires's curator insight, April 11, 5:58 AM

"Before these books, scholarly interest in the subject was confined to a few specialists in auction houses and museums. Parr-Badger have treated the photobook with respect, noting its special history, one that has developed parallel and separate from photography for galleries and magazines. Taking Americans out of their comfort zone, they aim to enlarge appreciation for photography books far beyond those select few produced for the art market on these shores. Both their politics and aesthetic is populist, in the left-of-center cultural studies mode that has flourished since the 1960s in British journalism."

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Alvin Langdon Coburn, British, b. United States 1882 – 1966
Miss...

Alvin Langdon Coburn, British, b. United States 1882 – 1966<br/>Miss... | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it
Alvin Langdon Coburn, British, b. United States 1882 – 1966
Miss Morris and Class ca. 1922
digital positive from original negative, gelatin on nitrocellulose roll film

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The great switch. From Canon full frame to Fuji X-Trans | Carlo Milani

The great switch. From Canon full frame to Fuji X-Trans | Carlo Milani | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it

A review of the Fujifilm X-Pro after one year. How the Fuji mirrorless cameras has become a photographic system 2.0.


It was not a downgrade. The decision to try Fuji has been long and thoughtful, after reading numerous reviews on sites, blogs and magazines, having evaluated opinions of early adopters who have ventured with this brand. A forum that I follow carefully is fredmiranda.com, in particular topics dedicated to images taken with a particular brand. In truth, the cause was when I picked up my old Praktica BC1 of 1989 (a Zeiss clone produced in the former East Germany: really another age). I did the first shots of my life with this camera, I was a child. What a feeling of freedom and lightness. Within that bright viewfinder I discovered the world of photography........


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"Street Photography" - by Rui Palha

"Street Photography" -  by Rui Palha | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it
Just a Photography lover

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Is post production bad? | Matthew Maddock

Is post production bad? |  Matthew Maddock | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it


I am going to write a series of short articles about some of the post production techniques I use, but as part of that I thought I’d start off with a debate on the use of post production in general. Is post production bad?  The argument will run and run that’s for sure.  It’s between the people who think that to be a good photographer you have to get it all exactly right in your camera, and in the extreme, those people who think that you have a free reign to process the hell out of RAW file! I guess I sit somewhere in the middle of the debate.  I’m not into processing an image to death – to start with I’m not skilled enough!  I have a huge respect for people who have this skill and can make an image look fantastic (without being obvious) in post production.  I like to get as much right in-camera as I can, but I don’t have a problem doing some editing and manipulation if I feel it improves the image, and I will often shoot with the post-production ideas already in my mind. When you shoot video it is generally clear to people/clients that you have to spend time away from the location editing the video, but when shooting stills a lot of clients think that you press the button and then just send them the image.  It isn’t apparent that editing stills is as much a part of modern photography as actually being on site taking the images.  It is a process than can take as much of your time (sometimes more) than you do actually shooting the images. I used to shoot film, I used to develop film, and I used to do my own prints.  Any photographer who shot film and cared about their work didn’t go to a high street print shop to get their prints done!  They often didn’t even do it themselves, they used professional printers and developers – much like today’s professional retouchers, these professionals knew what to do to get the best out of an image and would employ ‘post production’ techniques to do that......


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David Hellard's comment, November 14, 2013 11:32 AM
Looking forward to those articles, Thomas. The accompanying photograph is lovely.
Thomas Menk's comment, November 14, 2013 12:46 PM
Thx David :-)
Michael Petersen's curator insight, November 14, 2013 4:22 PM

Post production is essentisial all images are minipulated, first by the existing light,then by the camera and lastly by the photographer

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The Nikon DF Represents Everything Wrong With Photography

The Nikon DF Represents Everything Wrong With Photography | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it

Tonight Nikon will announce the “revolutionary” Nikon DF Camera. By “revolutionary” I mean that they have taken a full frame sensor from a current digital DSLR and put it into a non-ergonomic retro body and removed many features, including video. Are we excited about this camera because of the photography we will be able to capture with it or are we excited because we will look trendy and fashionable holding it?

 


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David Hellard's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:26 PM

I have to be completely honest, the retro look does get my attention. Not because of how I LOOK while holding it, but how I feel using it. I would never buy a camera that didnt have the specs I needed, but if it was a close tie between two and one had that look to it....well...

Michael Petersen's curator insight, November 10, 2013 5:09 PM

Hum nice camera

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Canon EOS Cameras: 100 things you never knew they could do | Digital Camera World

Canon EOS Cameras: 100 things you never knew they could do | Digital Camera World | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it
Get more from your Canon EOS cameras! Whether you have three camerabodies or one, these need-to-know tips are your ultimate Canon guide.

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For al the canon users

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Brian Griffin and the best photography book in the world

Brian Griffin and the best photography book in the world | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it
The other day I picked up a signed first edition of  what's been called "the best photography book in the world", for £15. "Work" by Brian Griffin, published in 1988, was named the best photo book ...

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Brian Griffin and the best photography book in the world

Brian Griffin and the best photography book in the world | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it
The other day I picked up a signed first edition of  what's been called "the best photography book in the world", for £15. "Work" by Brian Griffin, published in 1988, was named the best photo book ...

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The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it


Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro 1, Fuji X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more.

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 articles, reviews and X-Pro1 Photographer on the Web!

Curated by Thomas Menk


Thomas Menk on Twitter: http://twitter.com/fuji_x_pro


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Thomas Menk's curator insight, June 24, 2013 6:17 AM


If you would like to support my work - you can do that via Flattr.

Thank you :-)


Doug Chinnery's curator insight, October 17, 2013 10:27 AM

very useful collection of information on the X Pro 1

Ariel Gonzalez's curator insight, February 21, 9:42 AM

Great stuff from an  X Photographer 

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The Fuji X-E2: is it worth to upgrade? | Mike Kobal

The Fuji X-E2: is it worth to upgrade? | Mike Kobal | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it

 

.... only one and thankfully this is something Fuji can fix with a future firmware update: I miss the view mode button, however, not as terrible as anticipated because of the quick response time in eye sensor mode. Still annoying to be forced to go deep into the menu to change between EVF and LCD. Jesus. What were they thinking…..

 

This might finally be the camera I have been waiting for, fast, small, lightweight, unobtrusive. Personally, I think the X-E2 is one of the best examples of the form follows function principle. I am seriously considering giving up high speed sync and the inaudible shutter in favor of interchangeable lenses. And it is black. Hmmmm. Only time will tell, for now I am planning to keep mine  Check back by the end of the week for an update with images! .....


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Is post production bad? | Matthew Maddock

Is post production bad? |  Matthew Maddock | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it


I am going to write a series of short articles about some of the post production techniques I use, but as part of that I thought I’d start off with a debate on the use of post production in general. Is post production bad?  The argument will run and run that’s for sure.  It’s between the people who think that to be a good photographer you have to get it all exactly right in your camera, and in the extreme, those people who think that you have a free reign to process the hell out of RAW file! I guess I sit somewhere in the middle of the debate.  I’m not into processing an image to death – to start with I’m not skilled enough!  I have a huge respect for people who have this skill and can make an image look fantastic (without being obvious) in post production.  I like to get as much right in-camera as I can, but I don’t have a problem doing some editing and manipulation if I feel it improves the image, and I will often shoot with the post-production ideas already in my mind. When you shoot video it is generally clear to people/clients that you have to spend time away from the location editing the video, but when shooting stills a lot of clients think that you press the button and then just send them the image.  It isn’t apparent that editing stills is as much a part of modern photography as actually being on site taking the images.  It is a process than can take as much of your time (sometimes more) than you do actually shooting the images. I used to shoot film, I used to develop film, and I used to do my own prints.  Any photographer who shot film and cared about their work didn’t go to a high street print shop to get their prints done!  They often didn’t even do it themselves, they used professional printers and developers – much like today’s professional retouchers, these professionals knew what to do to get the best out of an image and would employ ‘post production’ techniques to do that......


Via Thomas Menk
Michael Petersen's insight:

Post production is essentisial all images are minipulated, first by the existing light,then by the camera and lastly by the photographer

more...
David Hellard's comment, November 14, 2013 11:32 AM
Looking forward to those articles, Thomas. The accompanying photograph is lovely.
Thomas Menk's comment, November 14, 2013 12:46 PM
Thx David :-)
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The Nikon DF Represents Everything Wrong With Photography

The Nikon DF Represents Everything Wrong With Photography | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it

Tonight Nikon will announce the “revolutionary” Nikon DF Camera. By “revolutionary” I mean that they have taken a full frame sensor from a current digital DSLR and put it into a non-ergonomic retro body and removed many features, including video. Are we excited about this camera because of the photography we will be able to capture with it or are we excited because we will look trendy and fashionable holding it?

 


Via Philippe Gassmann
Michael Petersen's insight:

Hum nice camera

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David Hellard's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:26 PM

I have to be completely honest, the retro look does get my attention. Not because of how I LOOK while holding it, but how I feel using it. I would never buy a camera that didnt have the specs I needed, but if it was a close tie between two and one had that look to it....well...

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Radical Freedom: Gareth McConnell, From Belfast to Ibiza

Radical Freedom: Gareth McConnell, From Belfast to Ibiza | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it
Photographer Gareth McConnell speaks to Anne-Celine Jaeger about his recently published book Close Your Eyes. They met in London to discuss civil liberties, mass communion, Ibiza and printing techniques.

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Mario Pires's curator insight, April 11, 6:32 AM

"The title of the book, Close Your Eyes, refers both to the aspect of getting completely off your tits, that feeling of ecstasy, of losing yourself, but also to closing your eyes to the horrors of all that’s going on. It’s like we’re encouraged to get off our head but discouraged from participating or understanding the world around us."

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Deconstructing the Selfie | Visual Culture Blog

Deconstructing the Selfie | Visual Culture Blog | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it

In this post I want to deconstruct the ‘selfie’, not just as a type of image that is widely produced and shared across the world, but also as a philosophical and cultural concept that is beginning to define our age. Voted as the Oxford dictionary of the year in 2013, the selfie is far more than a photographic trend: its popularity represents a significant shift in the way that we conceive of others and of ourselves. Rather than regarding the selfie as photograph, it might help to regard the selfie as a medium of identification. This post seeks to uncover what the selfie – as a cultural phenomenon – communicates about our shifting identities.


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Mario Pires's curator insight, March 31, 2:13 PM

A self portrait is almost as old as art, but the "selfie" is more than a image.

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En relayant des images sur les réseaux sociaux, ils comptent créer un business

En relayant des images sur les réseaux sociaux, ils comptent créer un business | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it
Un duo d'adolescents a réussi en quelques mois à rassembler près d'1 million d'abonnés sur un profil Twitter, @HistoryinPics, qui se contente de relayer des

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Mario Pires's curator insight, January 27, 6:21 AM

Retromania, fascination with the past, discovering the billion images produced, but never shown, but can a business be built on this base ? 

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Field Test: Sony A7R l Brian Smith Pictures

Field Test: Sony A7R l Brian Smith Pictures | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it

Six months ago a group of my fellow editorial portrait photographers were emailing each other about what wanted in their dream compact interchangeable lens camera:

“Digital Contax G2 / Minolta CLE”
“I’d like interchangeable lenses”
“Uses my old Leica M glass”
“Full Frame”
“Built-in EVF with live view when shooting video”
“RX1 gets close”

Sony’s newly announced A7R and A7 are the lightest interchangeable lens cameras ever made. They should really hit a sweet spot photographers have been craving...


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Michael Petersen's curator insight, October 22, 2013 5:36 PM

mmm might be time to think about a new camera

 

gitbew's comment, October 24, 2013 1:58 AM
Brilliant<br>
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Atherton Tablelands Wedding Venue - The Lodge at Tinaroo Lake Resort

Atherton Tablelands Wedding Venue - The Lodge at Tinaroo Lake Resort | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it
Cairns Highlands Atherton Tablelands Wedding Venue Lake front ceremony

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The Fuji Xpro1 in Studio | Part 1 of 2 | Nathan Elson

The Fuji Xpro1 in Studio | Part 1 of 2 | Nathan Elson | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it


When I bought the Fuji X-Pro1 back in February (2013) I never had any intentions of using it for anything other than a compact walk around camera to be used when I was out with my family, but the question of whether or not I thought it could be used as a working professionals camera was coming at me repeatedly from other photographers, so I decided to give it a test run. Now, there are those of you who are coming here that are more interested in the photos than my thoughts on the X-Pro1, so I’ll start off showing those and move onto my thoughts after. All of these images were shot using the Fuji XF 35mm f/1.4 lens, which is a 50mm equivalent when mounted on the X-Pro1. I used mixed lighting sources (flash mixed with constant light) with long exposures (around 2 seconds) to achieve the motion effects. Hair & Makeup by the incredibly talented Mallory McGowan.......


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Port Douglas Wedding Chapel, St Mary's by the Sea | Cairns & Port ...

St Mary's by the Sea in Port Douglas in a beautiful little white wedding chapel which also happens to be a wedding photographers dream.
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Brian Griffin and the best photography book in the world

Brian Griffin and the best photography book in the world | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it
The other day I picked up a signed first edition of  what's been called "the best photography book in the world", for £15. "Work" by Brian Griffin, published in 1988, was named the best photo book ...

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The Fuji Xpro1 in Studio | Part 1 of 2 | Nathan Elson

The Fuji Xpro1 in Studio | Part 1 of 2 | Nathan Elson | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it


When I bought the Fuji X-Pro1 back in February (2013) I never had any intentions of using it for anything other than a compact walk around camera to be used when I was out with my family, but the question of whether or not I thought it could be used as a working professionals camera was coming at me repeatedly from other photographers, so I decided to give it a test run. Now, there are those of you who are coming here that are more interested in the photos than my thoughts on the X-Pro1, so I’ll start off showing those and move onto my thoughts after. All of these images were shot using the Fuji XF 35mm f/1.4 lens, which is a 50mm equivalent when mounted on the X-Pro1. I used mixed lighting sources (flash mixed with constant light) with long exposures (around 2 seconds) to achieve the motion effects. Hair & Makeup by the incredibly talented Mallory McGowan.......


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Atherton Tableland Wedding photographer

Click here to edit the title

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Sony α7 / α7R First Impressions Review: Digital Photography Review

Sony α7 / α7R First Impressions Review: Digital Photography Review | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it

We've been shooting with Sony's Alpha 7 and Alpha 7R over the past few weeks to get insight into how the compact full-frame cameras behave. While the two models are twins, they're by no means identical, with each sibling very quickly showing its own, distinct personality. We'll be publishing more in the coming weeks as we move towards completing our review, but we wanted to share our perspective now that we've had some experience to inform our opinion.


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Michael Petersen's insight:

This goes on my wish list

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Михаил Крекин's curator insight, November 17, 2013 3:22 AM

полнокадровая беззеркалка

Art Jones's curator insight, November 18, 2013 6:10 PM

I'm beginning to really love what Sony is doing with their technology.

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Review: Carl Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 (Sony) - The Phoblographer (blog)

Review: Carl Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 (Sony) - The Phoblographer (blog) | Michael Petersen photography | Scoop.it
Review: Carl Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 (Sony)
The Phoblographer (blog)
The colors are different than what most photographers call the “Zeiss look”, but very pleasing nonetheless.

Via SC Photography
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I have always liked zeiss

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Jay - SonyAlphaLab's curator insight, June 21, 2013 7:53 AM

Review: Carl Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 (Sony)
The Phoblographer (blog)
The colors are different than what most photographers call the “Zeiss look”, but very pleasing nonetheless.