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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Why Your Website Needs a Mobile Experience Design

Why Your Website Needs a Mobile Experience Design | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it
Somewhere north of a billion: that’s the boggling number of websites the internet houses—but most of them aren’t optimized for mobile viewing. Although mobile and tablet devices are the internet

Via janlgordon
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janlgordon's comment, June 28, 11:22 PM
Thank you @Jenne and @Skylly_W :-)
janlgordon's comment, July 15, 10:50 AM
Thank you @Anna :-)
janlgordon's comment, July 27, 10:43 AM
Thank you @Antonio Ormachea :-)
Rescooped by John van den Brink from Startup Revolution
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People Marketing: How I Learned To Love People - Curagami via @ScentTrail

People Marketing: How I Learned To Love People - Curagami via @ScentTrail | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

People Marketing shares hard won tips, ideas and stories about loving, curating, listening to your people to create winning online marketing.

We included this link in our Startups Revoluiton Scoop.it because startups are so WIDGET focused they forget PEOPLE provide the context and emotional connection needed to SELL. It is understandable that YOU love your widget, but your customers love THEMSELVES much more.

Creating "like me" moments mean your "product" becomes a movement your customers want to join. This journey from YOU and THEM (customers) to WE is the most important journey every website and all marketing is on whether the creators know it or not.  


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Design Revolution
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15+ Awesome Food Web Designs & One BIG Mistake Your Design Can Learn From via @Curagami

15+ Awesome Food Web Designs & One BIG Mistake Your Design Can Learn From via @Curagami | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

Marty Note
Food Websites are great places to learn key elements of web design such as:

* Sensual and romantic images.
* Great mouth watering headlines.
* Visual marketing storytelling.

I like http://www.whitmansnyc.com/ and Soup Peddler. Whitmans BRANDS a hamburger beautifully. Food is HARD to shoot. Food can easily look TERRIBLE in a picture especially a picture with limited web resolution. Whitmans solves that problem creatively with a thin transparent layer between us and the burger. Well done!

Soup Peddler, in the example shown, is the ONLY site that includes PEOPLE. Foodies have "widget-itis" worse than techies. Widget don't sell as well as PEOPLE.

The SINGLE possible exception to that rule might be a foodie site, the one in 10M foodie sites that creates INCLUSION with their food. Whitman's is close since a hamburger is a universal thing, but the site remains a tad sterile due to lack of community.

If you scroll down below Whatman's hero you will see another pet peeve. WHY do web designers EVER let someone show an interior image WITHOUT PEOPLE.

Yes the lines are clean and the emptiness is sort of beautiful, but think about the NONVERBAL communication sent by an empty room. How long do you stay in an empty room when there is a party going on next door?

Food Heroes
So, foodie sites need people. There are several ways I would work people into the equation so the story being  told feels more inclusive and fun:

* Chef as Hero.
* People with SMILES looking UP at chef or waitstaff.
* Fan as hero (with story).

Food heroes (largest image on the page = hero) need to be QUIET and CONFIDENT. Too much NOISE or any WEAKNESS and we don't trust a website (or eat their food).

The CHEF is a hero that WORKS for any restaurant. Seeing Wolfgang Puck creates a brand. Seeing a chef wearing whites with a slightly stained towel over his (or her) shoulder says, "My food is so amazing you haven't LIVED until you've eaten here".

Instead of EMPTY rooms the picture is smiling, well dressed people looking up at the Chef or waitstaff listening in rapt attention. Better if dishes are gone b/c signals meal is over and everyone is still smiling (a tacit endorsement).

DON'T STAGE THIS PHOTO. Shoot it when a group is in for dinner (with permission and releases). Share the event and caption the photo. NEVER stage actors in food websites. Canned art + food says NO TRUST and DANGEROUS.

If your fans are MODEL good looking TELL THE STORY of the event that prompted the picture. What was being celebrated, shared or discussed. If the group is a nonprofit your restaurant supports MORE THE BETTER as you can tell 2 stories in one (risky but worth it).

Finally, you can feature a fan in your hero, BUT same "no canned or artificial" photos here either. ALSO, click me through to a page of pictures of other fans and stories (why they wanted to share their picture and story about FOOD i.e. make sure people know they aren't related :).

Food is SO individual, what I like and what you like can be very different, so think about the 5 stories you need to tell that "star" your content (i.e. tells the stories that cover the rainbow of your food's tribes).


One story shares love of sauces and sweet. Another story tells the visual romance story. Another might discuss meeting the chef and getting to know the "people behind the scenes".


Sharing different and strategically savvy stories creates the "like me" connection with the different tribes your food, restaurant and content should attract. Every restaurant has a passion. Share that passion.

Also share the reception the food creates, the passion others have for the food. Tell those stories in those ways and your foodie (or other) website wins hearts, minds and loyalty.



Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Rescooped by John van den Brink from visualizing social media
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Responsive Website Design: Everything You Need To Know [10 Infographics]

Responsive Website Design: Everything You Need To Know [10 Infographics] | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

These 10 infographics will teach you many essential elements to begin to know about Responsive Website Design- a major design trend for 2013.

Simply put, Responsive Website Design is a way for designers to create one website with a few style sheets, which allows the website to be seen on any device without having to create it from scratch for a tablet, mobile device, desktop device, etc.

With Mobile Search increasing rapidly, having a website that works for every device is a necessity and responsive design allows the site to reformat content appropriately.


Learn more at the infographic gallery at the article link...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by John van den Brink from visualizing social media
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26 Things to Note Before You Develop a Website – Infographic

26 Things to Note Before You Develop a Website – Infographic | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

If you are just getting started on the journey of developing your website, you may feel overwhelmed with all the things you need to figure out and plan before you even get started. There are definitely enough details to consider that it’s worth making a list so you don’t forget any of them. Or, instead of making your own list. This infographic from Pixaal showing the basic things to note before someone or company develop a website...


Via Lauren Moss
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Laser Focus Coaching's comment, April 25, 2013 5:53 PM
Great point Jayne.
Josie's comment, April 26, 2013 4:59 PM
Great points! I definitely would incorporate them into my workshops for entrepreneurs who may be just getting started or wondering why their site does not work!
AndySernovitz's curator insight, May 3, 2013 6:44 AM

There are definitely enough details to consider that it’s worth making a list so you don’t forget any of them. Or, instead of making your own list. This infographic showing the basic things to note before someone or company develop a website...

Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Storytelling, Scrolling Websites = Big Engagement

Storytelling, Scrolling Websites = Big Engagement | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

No matter how powerful a story is in itself, we’re going to like it more if it features a story that intrigues us, feeds our curiosity, and satisfies our answers in the end.


Via Karen Dietz
John van den Brink's insight:

Well, well well -- here's data from 1 million visitors from 10 publishers over a 24 hour period. The result? 300% more visitors on the article starting with a story. Wow!

 

Even better -- almost 68% of reader engagement happened below the fold. Yahoo! This kind of pokes a hole in the myth that people won't scroll down to read your post. They will if its a great story.

 

Plus there are some fascinating stats to share on visual storytelling. In fact, there's a lot of great info in this article, examples, and steps to take in this article, so get ready to dig in.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 28, 5:33 PM

Well, well well -- here's data from 1 million visitors from 10 publishers over a 24 hour period. The result? 300% more visitors on the article starting with a story. Wow!

 

Even better -- almost 68% of reader engagement happened below the fold. Yahoo! This kind of pokes a hole in the myth that people won't scroll down to read your post. They will if its a great story.

 

Plus there are some fascinating stats to share on visual storytelling. In fact, there's a lot of great info in this article, examples, and steps to take in this article, so get ready to dig in.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

Stan Smith's curator insight, March 30, 1:14 AM

Well, well well -- here's data from 1 million visitors from 10 publishers over a 24 hour period. The result? 300% more visitors on the article starting with a story. Wow!

 

Even better -- almost 68% of reader engagement happened below the fold. Yahoo! This kind of pokes a hole in the myth that people won't scroll down to read your post. They will if its a great story.

 

Plus there are some fascinating stats to share on visual storytelling. In fact, there's a lot of great info in this article, examples, and steps to take in this article, so get ready to dig in.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

steve batchelder's curator insight, March 31, 2:04 AM

Well, well well -- here's data from 1 million visitors from 10 publishers over a 24 hour period. The result? 300% more visitors on the article starting with a story. Wow!

 

Even better -- almost 68% of reader engagement happened below the fold. Yahoo! This kind of pokes a hole in the myth that people won't scroll down to read your post. They will if its a great story.

 

Plus there are some fascinating stats to share on visual storytelling. In fact, there's a lot of great info in this article, examples, and steps to take in this article, so get ready to dig in.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Best Brand Storytelling Site On The Web From Microsoft? via @kdietz

Best Brand Storytelling Site On The Web From Microsoft? via @kdietz | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it
Microsoft Stories: Best Brand Storytelling Site On The Web?
Business 2 Community
Hmm…strange for a corporate storytelling site, don't you think? Not if you're focused on one thing, and one thing only: Content.

Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 29, 2014 10:28 AM

This post by Arik Hanson is a review of Microsoft's website and the storytelling that is going on there. This is one company that's getting business storytelling right.


Why? Because Microsoft seems to be focusing more on sentiment than social signals. Now that's a change. I'm not sure if that's a good idea or not, but the quality of their storytelling is high. Maybe that's because they are more concerned about the quality of the story they are crafting than social media metrics. It seems logical the two are not mutually exclusive, but this seems to be Microsoft's strategy.


Enjoy the article and poking around the Microsoft site for examples of really good storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Martin Sturmer's curator insight, September 29, 2014 11:49 AM