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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling

The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it
To use the identifiable victim effect in marketing, we first need to understand the psychological underpinnings of this quirk. Let's explore, shall we?

Via Karen Dietz
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Carol Sanford's curator insight, June 27, 2013 4:01 PM

This is related to the brain's need to connect the absract and concrete. Innovation, learning and thinking anything new,  are all made possible by having an idea and making sense of it in our real lives. Storytelling is the same. The ideas in it need to be connected to concreteness, therefor a name, for it to 'sink in'.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 29, 2013 3:03 PM
So true Carol! I very much appreciate the comment and insight.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, June 29, 2013 7:13 PM

If a concept is too big, we can become overwhelmed.  It's easier to see how we could help one person, but it can be hard to see how we could help dozens, thousands, or millions.

 

Fellow curator Karen Deitz's comments (see below) summed up this article beautifully.

"One of the biggest mistakes I see that corporations, non-profits, and individuals make when sharing their business stories is they talk about 'a person' or 'a group' without giving them names and characteristics. In other words, whoever they are talking about are not identifiable.

 

If we don't have a name to hang on to, we can't connect. We want to connect with people. Without a name, 'a person' or 'a group' is just a concept."

Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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They are not for everyone: Tips for crafting B2B client success stories.

They are not for everyone: Tips for crafting B2B client success stories. | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

"I learned that no single story – or any piece of content marketing – works across the board, even for a select group of 400 sales people – let alone a market segment of 10,000 potential customers."


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 22, 2013 5:28 PM

Author Tim Keelan of StoryQuest writes a great article here about ways for ANY business to think about its storytelling.


Namely, that stories are universal, but no story is universal.


That means creating really targeted stories.


Keelan has lots of insights to share with us about this truism, and ways to get it done.


If you want to be a sharper storyteller -- one who is able to grow their business through sharing stories -- then you will want to read this article and follow Keelan's advice!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Have We Lost The Art Of Storytelling In Marketing?

Have We Lost The Art Of Storytelling In Marketing? | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

"As the buzz about content marketing, social media and all things digital continues to rise, one of the catch phrases that gets a lot of attention is storytelling in marketing. We afford it incredible lip service but do we actually practice it?"


Hmmmm -- good question. Here the author, Drew McLellan asks if in previous decades business was better at storytelling in its marketing and advertising.


Makes you think. Drew includes 3 videos to make his point. The first is a 1980s video from Dunkin Donuts as an example of effective storytelling. Well -- it is definitely not storytelling but instead an add that is all features and benefits.


The other two advertising videos however, are great examples from the past of really good stories.


I don't know if our biz storytelling is not as good these days as in previous decades. But I do like the questions Drew poses at the end of the post to help us decide.


What do you think? Is our biz storytelling better or worse than before?


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


Via Karen Dietz
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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Public Media Reinvents Itself With 'Full-Spectrum' Storytelling

Public Media Reinvents Itself With 'Full-Spectrum' Storytelling | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

"While not all agree, let's suppose, for a moment, that we are, in fact, presenting through our contemporary storytelling a relatively narrow range of the American experience. Some of the questions we ought to be asking are, is it enough to maintain the same formats, as we have, and try to entice more/different storytellers? Do we need to expand our awareness in some way to consider more broadly the particulars of this time, this particular space, and who is involved? And, fundamentally, what is it going to take to go further, to do more?"


Now here is a very thought-provoking piece about storytelling in general. I've curated it because the more businesses understand the craft of storytelling, the more effective we can be.


Warning -- there is such rich material here -- along with fabulous video examples to watch -- that you will need to carve out some time to explore everything here.


And hey -- we all live in a culture surrounded by media. It is important to keep up with shifts and changes in technology and its impact on storytelling so we can understand our daily life better -- and the opportunities open to us.  


What is the biggest shift technolgy brings? Ethnographic storytelling. What the heck is that? It is when you put the camera and the storytelling into the hands of people to create and tell their story. Nothing new here -- this was pioneered by Anthropologists Sol Worth & John Adair in the 1972 book Through Navajo Eyes.  The article contains several examples.


What is new is that now technology makes the ability to share our stories very easy and cheap to do -- through a proliferation of channels to share them. THAT is what is getting reinvented -- not the structure of a good story.


And technology is bringing us unique and very creative ways to craft our stories. For example, there's a link within this article to "How the Indie Audio Community Is Transforming Storytelling," This article shares a story where audio is dominant. It is great.


Other examples in the article include Localore -- a project about place-based storytelling.


What do I like about this article and the links to other articles within this piece? It asks essential questions like:

  1. Who gets to tell the story?
  2. Who gets to ask the question that begins the story?
  3. What is the question?


When businesses and organizations start asking themselves these questions FIRST when wanting to tell a digital story, they focus on the story first. Too many people in my experience -- when wanting to tell a digital story -- get caught up in the technology first and end up spending tons of money with unhappy results. Or they think the story will emerge if they just start talking - to be edited down by the videographer into a story -- with the same unhappy results.


So read this article, its links to other articles, explore the digital story examples given, and start figuring out the following:

  1. How can I have my customers share their stories about my organization using ethnographic storytelling?
  2. How can I leverage audio storytelling (see the article for info/examples) beyond radio & podcasts?
  3. How can I leverage location & physical space to share biz stories?
  4. How can I creatively use technology to share biz stories that reflect my/our Unique Voice & Unique Proposition?


I could comment at length on this article and its links. It has taken me awhile to curate this piece because I kept going back and dipping in for more.


So give yourself time to enjoy this creative romp exploring cutting edge electronic storytelling and all the deep insights here!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


Via Karen Dietz
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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Who Do You Want Your Customers to Become? A better biz story

Who Do You Want Your Customers to Become? A better biz story | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it
Right answers to wrong questions virtually guarantee failure. Innovators betting on "out of the box" thinking or "faster, better, cheaper" innovation paradigms for success all too frequently find themselves — and their customers — disappointed.


Hey folks -- this is a pivotal article about biz storytelling. Why??


Because it addresses the most neglected aspect of effective business storytelling -- the story about the future that you and your customers/clients are creating together.


What I love about this article is its twist -- the level of biz storytelling these days is mostly focused on how to authentically share stories about your products/services, people, or founding to capture the hearts and minds of propsects and build loyal customers. That is OK as far as it goes.


But there could be more. Way more.


Instead of asking, "What do our customers want [and how do I share a story about that]?" how about asking, "What do our customers want to become [and what is the story I can share about that]?" What a fundamentally different -- and better -- question!


Org story advice for crafting 'Future Stories' is typically "Write a newspaper article about your company 5 years from now & the awards you are receivng" or some such version of that. Not bad. But there could be more -- way more.


When we start asking ourselves the questions posed in this article, whole new worlds start opening up. 'Future stories' are really about the future we are creating together with our customers/clients -- it is the call to be part of something bigger than ourselves.


Go read this article -- quickly! You will be glad you did because it will get you to fundamentally shift how you think about and share about your business, and the stories you tell about it.


And if you need a really great example of a company doing this, then check out this latest Nike video. 

http://www.cbssports.com/olympics/blog/eye-on-olympics/19654085/video-nikes-new-olympics-ad-greatness-is-for-all-of-us 


And if you want to review a written form of this, then check out my Manifesto on my website. The Manifesto is still a work in progress, but you will get the idea. http://www.juststoryit.com/FutureStory 


Enjoy this short article -- its insights, questions, and a different kind of conversation we can have about business storytelling.


Via Karen Dietz
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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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10 Steps To Designing An Amazing [Storied] Infographic

10 Steps To Designing An Amazing [Storied] Infographic | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it
Information can be useful--and even beautiful--but only when it’s presented well. In an age of information overload, any guidance through the clutter comes as a welcome relief. That’s one reason for the recent popularity of information graphics.


Got data? Need it to tell a story? Then make sure you read this article about constructing a storied infographic. An infographic is one visual storytelling method.


Yes, there are graphics tips here for us non-graphics people like "Choosing a Format". But the majority of the article is about effective storytelling with data. Like tips on "Finding the Narrative" and "Identifying Problems" (essential to a good story) to locating the "Hero" or key message.


And I like how the author, Josh Smith, dicusses determining a visual approach.


In the end, having graphic design skills seems necessary to do this type of visual storytelling well. 


Yet I think that there are plenty of ways to use the tips in this article to take simple data in our work and turn it into visually inspiring pieces without being a graphic designer. 


So take these tips and play/experiment with the simple tools we do have available to us non-graphic biz folks: PowerPoint, MSPublisher, Excel, Keynote, Prezi, and the like.


Read the full article here: http://www.fastcodesign.com/1670019/10-steps-to-designing-an-amazing-infographic 


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


Via Karen Dietz
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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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How To Get More Fans (and Why That’s a Horrible Idea)

How To Get More Fans (and Why That’s a Horrible Idea) | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

“How do I get more fans?” I hear this a lot. I’ve written about how to get more followers a few times, so instead of the same old, I thought I’d address this to folks who are working on growing themselves to be a person who has something of a growing (or huge) platform and is trying to understand how to use social platforms to build something better/deeper/more. And there might be a good place to start. “WHY” are you seeking to get more fans? And do you really want fans?

 

Why are you sharing your business stories? To get more fans (storytelling) or to build and engage with a community (story sharing)?

 

This article puts us all straight -- fans are OK but the real gold is in building community.

 

Read this article for more insights and target your business stories towards building community. That means listening to the stories of and within your community in return!


Via Karen Dietz
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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Stories & Gaming Can Make A Better World

Stories & Gaming Can Make A Better World | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

We are the stories we are told. Each of us alone and all of us together are the living embodiment of all the stories we have heard and all the stories we have told each other. Narrative shapes our behaviors, our thoughts, our actions.

 

The original title of this article is "The Universal Language of Story." But there's no new there. The article is OK but missed the point of the video referenced in the post, I think.

 

What IS news about the article is the 20-min. TED video. In the video, Jane McGonigal shares her passion for how gaming and storytelling together can make a better world.

 

The extent of my electronic gaming consists of Solitaire, Majong, or Sudoko on my phone or iPod. But after watching this video, I'm inspired to take the leap into online gaming.

 

What Jane does in this video is share how storied games train us in ways that allow us to pull together for the social good. Now that's amazing and a fabulous twist on how and why linking gaming and storytelling into our business practices could lead to amazing results.

 

Then make sure you watch the video on "Beyond the 'Like' Button: Digitally Addictive Storytelling and the Brain" in the next post here in this collection. The 2 go hand-in-hand and will really open your eyes.

 

So watch the video, get your creative thinking cap on, and game on!


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's comment, April 30, 2012 10:05 AM
Thanks for re-scooping this John!
Rescooped by John van den Brink from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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7 Ways to Write Damn Bad Copy & Stories

7 Ways to Write Damn Bad Copy & Stories | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it
It's obvious that creativity is an essential part of being a remarkable writer. But when a results-oriented writer says "creative" and an image-oriented

Via Karen Dietz
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Matt McGuire's curator insight, April 10, 2013 11:38 AM

With a headline like that, this article makes nervous reading for professional copywriters and marketeers everywhere...

 

Can you make it all the way to the end without wailing, 'Oh, drat - I'm guilty of that one!'

Karen Dietz's comment, April 11, 2013 11:06 AM
LOL Matt! I had the same experience :)
Mike Ellsworth's comment, April 11, 2013 11:18 AM
Yup, everyone slips into bad habits at some point . . .