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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Startup Revolution
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Holiday Ecommerce: 5 Storytelling Tips via Curagami

Holiday Ecommerce: 5 Storytelling Tips via Curagami | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

Telling Holiday Ecom Stories
Why do most online merchants shy away from stories in the 4th quarter? Time to make the donuts doesn't mean stories don't matter. Shout less, listen more and telling better stories means your online commerce website wins this holiday season. Here are our 5 Holiday Ecommerce Storytelling Tips: 

* Create Umbrella Themes

* Tell Price, Shipping, and Guarantee Stories

* Share Brand Relevant Customer Stories

* Tell Seasonal VISUAL Stories

* ASK FOR HELP

Discover more 4Q storytelling tips for online merchants:

 

http://www.curagami.com/ecommerce-holiday-5-storytelling-tips/?v=7516fd43adaa


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Startup Revolution
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Why Ashton Kutcher's 15M Followers Doesn't = End of Days: Forbes Says @Scoopit Rocks

Why Ashton Kutcher's 15M Followers Doesn't = End of Days: Forbes Says @Scoopit Rocks | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

"Decugis tells me that Scoop.it was created as a better response to an “information overload” environment.  Typically, Internet sites use sophisticated algorithms to find huge volumes of information and then drown us in it.  Little of that information is directly related to an individual user’s needs or interests.
 

“Human beings aren’t predictable,” Decugis says.  “We realized algorithms alone aren’t great at predicting the content you will want.”  Scoop.it’s solution has been to combine the best of computer brains with human brains.  A community of real humans works to screen and curate information so that it flows to the right channels.
 

Real humans can use real judgment, real intuition and real common sense to identify what other real humans are craving—even as they use a certain amount of electronic wizardry to help sort through a rushing river of data.  “We don’t just publish content,” Decugis says.  “We rank it and optimize it.”  This model may be a solid bet for reducing the havoc of information overload."


Via Howard Rheingold, Pierre Levy, Luciana Viter, Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, August 8, 2013 7:44 AM

Don't Miss
About to be an amazing conversation between GREAT thinkers on Kutcher, Scoop.it, Web 3.0 and the meaning of life here on G+http://bit.ly/195EPQZ 

I know this because my friend @MarkTraphagen just bated the trapped :). Weigh In! 

Scoop.it Rocks

Forbes asks us to bet on a smarter web. Not sure that is a bet I'm willing to make. Forbes is asking the wrong question in the wrong way. I love that they are half promoting Scoop.it as the path to a smarter web, but the zero sum nature of their questioning seems limited and goofystupid. 

Goofystupid because the web is the land of AND not OR. We can have millions following Ashton Kutcher and the elegant and beautiful can exist for those willing to find it. Scoop.it makes elegance and grace easier to find. The one (Kutcher's millions of followers) is not necessarily a sign of the apocalypse nor does it subtract from the other (our ability to find and connect with  "like me" tribes.  

 I write this knowing that drawing an imaginary line between good and evil is a common practice (one I've used too), but the web is capable of rewarding small, medium and large. AND the rewards often fit perfectly :). Kutcher gets the millions of fans he wants and little guys like me will get several people to several hundred a day who contribute, think and expand the dialogue about what Internet marketing is and can be. 

Seems fair to me. That Scoop.it is our tool of choice isn't surprising since it helps curate content. Curation is more important than creation for a host or reasons (greater reach, more efficient content marketing testing and cheap). 

Yes Scoop.it ROCKS AND Kutcher has millions of followers. That is NOT the seventh sign and we don't all need to hoard water and can goods :). 

 

 

Marie Jeffery's comment, August 8, 2013 9:16 AM
Well said, Marty! I clicked on this article because I was curious why you had a photo of Ashton Kutcher, and knew it would be an insightful post! Not disappointed - I'm a quiet lurker who has learned a lot about marketing from your Scoop.it Revolution pages! Thanks for your generosity.
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, August 8, 2013 9:48 AM
Thanks Marie and great comments by Stephen Dale too!
Rescooped by John van den Brink from Design Revolution
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Websites Don't Age Well: 5 Web Redesign Ideas via @Curagami

Websites Don't Age Well: 5 Web Redesign Ideas via @Curagami | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

Websites don't age well. Sooner than you think it's time for a web redesign, but don't forget the 5 CSFs (Critical Success Factors) shared here.

5 Critical Success Factors For When Your Web Redesign

  • Start with Why.
  • Listen to customer votes
  • Test if you can, jump in if you can’t.
  • 5 Easy to forget things.
  • Prepare for rain, hope for sun.


This post features behind the scenes notes from our http://www.Moon-Audio.com redesign. Picture above is a "Before" and "After" view of Moon Audio's website. We spent a lot of time working on the site's information architecture.

We spent so much time because we have a lot of customer data now thanks to Google Analytics. We used that data to find the 80-20 rule and kept that finding in mind as we changed site navigation and categories.

This kind of "What Business are we In" work goes to the first two bullet point - Start with Why and Listen To Customer Votes. Another goal, not stated in the Curagami post, was to create an immediate sense of "I'm in the right place" scenttrail.

Ecommerce, especially in popular categories such as #headphones and #electronics, have two kinds of sties. One site is informational making money from passing customers over to sellers. Cnet.com is an example of a content site making money by capturing attention with great content and then passing customers on to a site where they can buy what they've just researched.

The New Ecommerce
We see the New Ecommerce merging Cnet and commerce to build sustainable online community. But there's a problem. Either of those missions is a full-time job - commerce, content or community. Merchants will need to delegate content creation to trusted members of their community and find ways to merchandise content and commerce more seamlessly than ever before.

The new Moon-Audio.com begins the move toward sustainable online content, commerce and community by clearly signalling THIS IS A STORE. Soon we hope to increase the signal to THIS IS A STORE WHERE YOU CAN LEARN TOO and finally THIS IS A COMMUNITY WHERE YOU CAN BUY AND LEARN.

Mashing up, curating and listening are the new skills needed to be a successful online merchant. No ecom site is GREAT at content, commerce and community...yet. Moon-Audio.com will fire on all three ideas over the next few months. Stay tuned.

http://www.curagami.com/magical-thinking/5-web-redesign-ideas/



Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Lori Wilk's curator insight, February 20, 2015 2:58 PM

I count on Marty to #curate #content that helps me make my #business better. Thank-you. 

Rescooped by John van den Brink from Curation Revolution
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Scoopit and Content Marketing Analysis

Analysis of two years of Scoopit use to curate and create content marketing.

Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:24 PM

Had fun creating a series of charts showing how each content marketing feed created on Scoop.it make a contribution to a tapestry of content marketing.

Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com's curator insight, May 5, 2013 8:46 AM

Thanks Marty for sharing.


SHARING is a key part of this web social economy we are living in right now. It started with content, (message boards, blogs) and now has moved on to cars (Zipcar), bikes (Citi Bike) and beds (AirBnB). 


We are becoming more connected than ever before and OUR online profiles, that WE and OTHERS create about US is driving this sharing economy.


Marty, I know you and I have never met in person but via Scoop.it and social sharing we are connected. Interesting how business is changing.

Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, May 5, 2013 7:29 PM
Agree Brian. When SHARING is at the core many things change such as: competition, how we scale, how we make money and how and what we support.

In a social sharing time we compete in a more collaborative way where rising tides lift all boats. I was shocked to be in a meeting the other day where someone was pithing the idea of unilateral zero sum benefit. Shocked because everyone I work with get it - that doing the right thing is increasingly the right thing to do. I wasn't going to convince this particular manager that WE are stronger than I or ME, but most of us are getting it and that is one of the things driving Scoop.it's success :).M