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Rescooped by John van den Brink from Marketing Revolution
Scoop.it!

7 Tools for Lean Content Marketing via @Scoopit team and Martin Smith

Recently, Scoop.it released the official #leancontent framework. The lean content ideology addresses the issue of knowing a content strategy is necessary but...

Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, May 15, 2014 2:14 PM

Yeah this deck from Ally rocks. 3 "new to me" content curation tools and love the lean content overlay. #toogood #mustread

Craig Stark's curator insight, May 16, 2014 10:45 AM

Good summary- useful tools.

Rescooped by John van den Brink from Curation Revolution
Scoop.it!

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter [+Scenttrail Comment]

Why I Don't Like Scoopit Links on Twitter [+Scenttrail Comment] | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

I’m seeing more Scoopit links in my Twitter stream and I’m not crazy about it.  Sure it’s quick and easy to share with Scoopit.  But it not quick and easy to consume. For me it's all about the econ...

Marty Note (here is comment I wrote on Dr. V's blog)

Appreciate Bryan’s and Joseph’s comment, but I rarely use Scoop.it as a pass through. More than 90% of the time I’m adding “rich snippets” to content I Scoop.

Rich snippets are “blog” posts that fall between Twitter and the 500 to 1,000 words I would write in Scenttrail Marketing. I often create original content ON Scoop.it because whatever I’m writing falls in the crack between Twitter’s micro blog and what I think of as needing to be on my marketing blog.


I was taught NOT to pass through links on Scoop.it early on by the great curator Robin Good. Robin has well over 1M views on Scoop.it now and his advice along with the patient advice of other great Scoop.it curators has my profile slouching toward 150,000 views.


Bryan is correct that some curators new to Scoop.it haven’t learned the Robin Good lesson yet. I agree it is frustrating to go to a link and not receive anything of value back, to simply need to click on another link. Curators who pass through links won’t scale, so the Darwinian impact will be they will learn to add value or die out.


For my part I always identify my Scoop.it links, probably about half the content I Tweet and about a quarter of my G+ shares. I also routinely share my favorite “Scoopiteers”, great content curators who taught me valuable lessons such as don’t simply pass through links but add “micro blogging” value via rich snippets.


When you follow or consistently share content from a great curator on Scooop.it you begin to understand HOW they shape the subjects they curate. I know, for example, Robin Good is amazing on new tools. Scoop.it anticipated this learning and built in a feature where I can suggest something to Robin.


This is when Scoop.it is at its most crowdsourcing best because I now have an army of curators who know I like to comment on and share content about design or BI or startups and they (other Scoopiteers) keep an eye out for me. There are several reasons Scoop.it is a “get more with less effort” tool and this crowdsourcing my curation is high on the list.


So, sorry you are sad to see Scoop.it links and understand your frustration. You’ve correctly identified the problem too – some curators don’t know how to use the tool yet. I know it is a lot to ask to wait for the Darwinian learning that will take place over generations, but Scoop.it and the web have “generations” that have the half life of a gnat so trust that the richness of the Scoop.it community will win in the end and “the end” won’t take long.


To my fellow Scoop.it curators we owe Bryan and Joseph thanks for reminding us of what Robin Good taught me – add value or your Scoop.it won’t scale. That lessons is applicable to much more than how we use Scoop.it.


Marty

 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Karen Dietz's comment, August 22, 2014 2:07 PM
Right on Marty! I'm re-scooping this as a way to help that learning along about how to really use Scoop.it well and leverage it.
Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 22, 2014 2:25 PM

FYI Folks -- I trust that the reviews I write about the articles I curate help people along in their business storytelling journey. I know that there are many curators out there who do not add reviews/comments to the articles they highlight. 


As a result, Scoop.it and other curation sites are getting a backlash because audience members are tired of getting a link to an article that brings them to Scoop.it, and then requires another click to get to the article. Now I know that is annoying. And there is nothing of value offered between clicks.


Marty's response to the original blog post is right on. Read it along with all the other comments. Truly illuminating.


Other than a rant for me, what's the value of this post to you and business storytelling?


Namely this -- no matter what medium you use -- blogging, curating, digital storytelling -- make sure you are actually adding value for your audience. Expand their knowledge, give them tools, show them how, and offer your excellent insights. The stories you share have to connect to your audience in these ways. Anything else is a waste.


All of these posts and reviews add up to telling your story in a big picture way. So thanks Marty for addressing this issue, and reminding us about principles for quality curation. I've learned a lot from both you and Robin!


Karen Dietz

Bob Connelly's comment, November 23, 2014 7:11 PM
Being new to Scoop.it, I was glad to read this. I wouldn't have thought about this...
Rescooped by John van den Brink from Startup Revolution
Scoop.it!

Why Ashton Kutcher's 15M Followers Doesn't = End of Days: Forbes Says @Scoopit Rocks

Why Ashton Kutcher's 15M Followers Doesn't = End of Days: Forbes Says @Scoopit Rocks | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

"Decugis tells me that Scoop.it was created as a better response to an “information overload” environment.  Typically, Internet sites use sophisticated algorithms to find huge volumes of information and then drown us in it.  Little of that information is directly related to an individual user’s needs or interests.
 

“Human beings aren’t predictable,” Decugis says.  “We realized algorithms alone aren’t great at predicting the content you will want.”  Scoop.it’s solution has been to combine the best of computer brains with human brains.  A community of real humans works to screen and curate information so that it flows to the right channels.
 

Real humans can use real judgment, real intuition and real common sense to identify what other real humans are craving—even as they use a certain amount of electronic wizardry to help sort through a rushing river of data.  “We don’t just publish content,” Decugis says.  “We rank it and optimize it.”  This model may be a solid bet for reducing the havoc of information overload."


Via Howard Rheingold, Pierre Levy, Luciana Viter, Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, August 8, 2013 7:44 AM

Don't Miss
About to be an amazing conversation between GREAT thinkers on Kutcher, Scoop.it, Web 3.0 and the meaning of life here on G+http://bit.ly/195EPQZ 

I know this because my friend @MarkTraphagen just bated the trapped :). Weigh In! 

Scoop.it Rocks

Forbes asks us to bet on a smarter web. Not sure that is a bet I'm willing to make. Forbes is asking the wrong question in the wrong way. I love that they are half promoting Scoop.it as the path to a smarter web, but the zero sum nature of their questioning seems limited and goofystupid. 

Goofystupid because the web is the land of AND not OR. We can have millions following Ashton Kutcher and the elegant and beautiful can exist for those willing to find it. Scoop.it makes elegance and grace easier to find. The one (Kutcher's millions of followers) is not necessarily a sign of the apocalypse nor does it subtract from the other (our ability to find and connect with  "like me" tribes.  

 I write this knowing that drawing an imaginary line between good and evil is a common practice (one I've used too), but the web is capable of rewarding small, medium and large. AND the rewards often fit perfectly :). Kutcher gets the millions of fans he wants and little guys like me will get several people to several hundred a day who contribute, think and expand the dialogue about what Internet marketing is and can be. 

Seems fair to me. That Scoop.it is our tool of choice isn't surprising since it helps curate content. Curation is more important than creation for a host or reasons (greater reach, more efficient content marketing testing and cheap). 

Yes Scoop.it ROCKS AND Kutcher has millions of followers. That is NOT the seventh sign and we don't all need to hoard water and can goods :). 

 

 

Marie Jeffery's comment, August 8, 2013 9:16 AM
Well said, Marty! I clicked on this article because I was curious why you had a photo of Ashton Kutcher, and knew it would be an insightful post! Not disappointed - I'm a quiet lurker who has learned a lot about marketing from your Scoop.it Revolution pages! Thanks for your generosity.
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, August 8, 2013 9:48 AM
Thanks Marie and great comments by Stephen Dale too!
Rescooped by John van den Brink from Curation Revolution
Scoop.it!

I Scoop Therefore I am

I Scoop Therefore I am | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

I Scoop Therefore I am. 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
John van den Brink's insight:

Great insight by Martin about Scoop.It! I've been following Martin over a year now and re-scooped his Scoops many times. I highly recommend his topics  http://www.scoop.it/u/martin-marty-smith

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Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, April 24, 2013 2:29 PM
LOL...Great curation is more other!
Pascale Mousset's comment, April 24, 2013 6:36 PM
Great Scoop Marty ! You re right
Therese Torris's comment, April 25, 2013 4:49 AM
Right on, Marty !
Rescooped by John van den Brink from Personal Branding Using Scoopit
Scoop.it!

How I Use Scoop.it To Find Content Marketing's Over / Under - @Scenttrail

How I Use Scoop.it To Find Content Marketing's Over / Under - @Scenttrail | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

Visual Marketing Over/Under or How I Use Scoop.it
Friends like +Phil Buckley and +Mark Traphagen are curious about how and why I use Scoop.it. This G+ post shares a detailed analysis of how Scoop.it helps reduce #contentmarketing risks, provides fast feedback to influence social media marketing and creates a safe envrionment to test assumptions, create validated learning and learn fast. 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
John van den Brink's insight:

Great post and a must read by @Martin (Marty) Smith

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Ally Greer's curator insight, March 19, 2014 11:41 PM

We're always finding different ways to use Scoop.it, mostly coming from the intelligent community of curators that has manifested itself over the last few years.


Scoop.it Specialist @Martin (Marty) Smith wrote an explanation of how he's using Scoop.it to gauge interest in potential original content. When his posts on Scoop.it do well, he is able to see what his audience likes, and create content along the same vein.


He also explains some of the SEO benefits seen by other Scoopiteers like @Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com.


Read Marty's post to find new creative ways to measure the potential success of content using Scoop.it and share your thoughts in the comments!

Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, March 20, 2014 12:06 AM
Thanks for the share @Ally Greer. Don't like the RISK FACTORS without @Scoop.it since each post puts modeled and valuable websites at risk. Better to test with the "fastest feedback loop in the west" :). Marty
LKGayton's curator insight, March 20, 2014 10:52 AM

Scoop.it influences social media marketing and more...

Rescooped by John van den Brink from Curation Revolution
Scoop.it!

20 Favorite Content Curators on Scoop.it Are #MustFollows

20 Favorite Content Curators on Scoop.it Are #MustFollows | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

20 Scoopiteers who've taught me more than I can repay in one lifetime about #contentmarketing and #contentcuration are #MustFollows :

@Robin Good

@maxOz(Michele)
@Ally Greer

@Ana Cristina Pratas

@ janlgordon

@Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com

@Karen Dietz

@malek

@Thomas Faltin

@Jeff Domansky

@Alex Butler

@The Fish Firm

@massimo facchinetti

@Giuseppe Mauriello

@Mariano Pallottini

@Jesús Hernández

@Guillaume Decugis

@Cendrine Marrouat - SocialMediaSlant.com

@Neil Ferree

@Jesús Hernández


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
John van den Brink's insight:

A great list! You need to follow these Scoopiteers and of course @Martin (Marty) Smith

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malek's curator insight, June 24, 2014 11:18 AM

@Neil Ferree You made my day again.

massimo scalzo's curator insight, June 25, 2014 3:56 AM

Marty Smith gives us a list of persons who know HOW....We can take a look at thema and see how they curate Content. Thank you Marty!

Rémy Ginoux's curator insight, July 10, 2014 6:21 PM

Possible Inspiring readings for Summer Vacation...

Rescooped by John van den Brink from BI Revolution
Scoop.it!

"5 New eCommerce Lessons" - Haiku Deck by Mark Traphagen Trending On SlideShare

"5 New eCommerce Lessons" - Haiku Deck by Mark Traphagen Trending On SlideShare | AtDotCom Social media | Scoop.it

Five elements creating an eCommerce store can bring to your marketing efforts. Master marketer Martin W. Smith by Mark Traphagen. 


Via Martin (Marty) Smith
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Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, June 29, 2013 12:44 PM

Lean Content Movement
Guillaume, Marc and Alley are championing a new movement I believe in. The "Lean Content" movement is about creating rich visual marketing and getting your point across faster and with less work by your audience.

My friend @MarkTraphagen just used one of his favorite tools, Hiaku Deck, to demonstrate this with my 5 New Ecommerce Lessons (http://scenttrail.blogspot.com/2013/06/5-new-ecommerce-lessons.html ) post.

I loved the example so much I embedded it on top of the post. Haiku Deck is a great tool and Mark is an amazing teacher.

COOL
Mark's Haiku Deck of my blog post is TRENDING on Slideshare (linked off their homepage):
http://www.slideshare.net/?ss