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Homemade dew heaters for a telescope - Deep Sky Watch

Homemade dew heaters for a telescope - Deep Sky Watch | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
home made dew controller and heater straps for telescopes and eyepieces...

Via CRodriguez
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Astronomía de campo
Astronomía general y efemérides.
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NASA | A First for IRIS: Observing a Gigantic Solar Eruption - YouTube

A coronal mass ejection burst off the side of the sun on May 9, 2014. The giant sheet of solar material erupting was the first CME seen by NASA's Interface R...

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CRodriguez's curator insight, May 31, 4:40 AM
Luis Quevedo ‏@luis_quevedo  4 min

#video gigante eyeccion de la corona solar NASA | A First for IRIS: Observing a Gigantic Sol…: http://youtu.be/SuAjao9e51U ;

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APOD: 2014 April 4 - Along the Western Veil

APOD: 2014 April 4 - Along the Western Veil | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it

A different astronomy and space science related image is featured each day, along with a brief explanation.


Via Marcelo Bassani de Freitas
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The 20 biggest questions in science that still remain in 2013

The 20 biggest questions in science that still remain in 2013 | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it

From the nature of the universe (that's if there is only one) to the purpose of dreams, there are lots of things we still don't know – but we might do soon:

 

1 What is the universe made of?

2 How and where did life begin?

3 Are we alone in the universe?

4 What makes us human?

5 What defines consciousness?

6 Why do we dream?

7 Why is there stuff?

8 Are there other universes?

9 Where do we put all the carbon?

10 How do we get more energy from the sun?

11 What's so weird about prime numbers?

12 How do we beat bacteria?

13 Can computers keep getting faster?

14 Will we ever cure cancer?

15 How will robots advance?

16 What's at the bottom of the ocean?

17 What's at the bottom of a black hole?

18 Can we live forever?

19 How do we solve the population problem?

20 What is time?

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Adrian Rojas's comment, September 18, 2013 6:32 PM
What is the universe made of?
2 How and where did life begin?
3 Are we alone in the universe?
4 What makes us human?
5 What defines consciousness?
6 Why do we dream?
7 Why is there stuff?
8 Are there other universes?
9 Where do we put all the carbon?
10 How do we get more energy from the sun?
11 What's so weird about prime numbers?
12 How do we beat bacteria?
13 Can computers keep getting faster?
14 Will we ever cure cancer?
15 How will robots advance?
16 What's at the bottom of the ocean?
17 What's at the bottom of a black hole?
18 Can we live forever?
19 How do we solve the population problem?
20 What is time?
All these questions can be so easily answered because you should be able to answer all of these without hesitating. Like number 1 "what is the universe made of" umm hello seriously it's made of planets,stars, and gravity. I can understand number 2 because this question can be answered on what you believe in like Jesus made us, or we originate from monkeys. But number 8 is another one of those dumb questions "are there other universes" of course there is there's hundreds if billions of universes is just a galaxy.

I like this article because its interesting to know the questions other people have. And it gives a lot of explanations of why people don't know these answers to the questions. I also like the way it doesn't change subject at all like the other article I read and this one is non-fiction. But there I something I don't understand the first paragraph on this article says "questions we don't know the answers to but soon will, but I know most of these answers. So does that mean I'm like smarter or better than most people when it comes to science?
Gerome Tadeja's comment, October 5, 2013 8:51 AM
I thought that this article was interesting because I got to see some of the questions other people had.
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Astronomers witness birth of Milky Way's most massive star

Astronomers witness birth of Milky Way's most massive star | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
Scientists have observed in unprecedented detail the birth of a massive star within a dark cloud core about 10,000 light years from Earth.

Via Ioannis
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Space Pictures This Week: Starburst Aurora, Milky Way Portraits

Space Pictures This Week: Starburst Aurora, Milky Way Portraits | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
A galaxy hunter takes a last look, the Milky Way shines, and auroras shimmer in this week's best space pictures.

Via Informatics
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Voyager 1 se acerca a los confines del sistema solar - La Nación Costa Rica

Voyager 1 se acerca a los confines del sistema solar - La Nación Costa Rica | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
La Nación Costa Rica
Voyager 1 se acerca a los confines del sistema solar
La Nación Costa Rica
Desde 1977, la sonda espacial Voyager 1 se ha dedicado a recorrer el sistema solar.
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Astronomía de campo

Astronomía de campo | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it

La página Facebook de mi blog Astronomía de campo.

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La página Facebook de mi blog Astronomía de campo.

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Astronomía de campo: Efemérides astronómicas para junio.

Astronomía de campo: Efemérides astronómicas para junio. | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
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Actualización del blog Astronomía de campo. / Efemérides junio y más.

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Milky Way black hole snacks on hot gas

Milky Way black hole snacks on hot gas | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
The Herschel space observatory has made detailed observations of surprisingly hot gas that may be orbiting or falling towards the supermassive black hole lurking at the center of our Milky Way galaxy.

Via Ioannis
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Actualización de la página ADC.

Actualización de la página ADC. | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
Astronomia de campo
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Actualización de la página ADC.

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Astronomía de campo: Observación de objetos de cielo profundo

Astronomía de campo: Observación de objetos de cielo profundo | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
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Actualización del blog astronomiadecampo.blogspot.com.es / Observación de objetos de cielo profundo.

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Astronomía de campo: El cometa C2013 A1, ¿impactará en Marte en el 2014?

Astronomía de campo: El cometa C2013 A1, ¿impactará en Marte en el 2014? | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
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El cometa C2013 A1, ¿impactará en Marte en el 2014?

El cometa C2013 A1, ¿impactará en Marte en 2014?

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Por qué no fue detectado el meteorito que cayó en Rusia - FayerWayer

Por qué no fue detectado el meteorito que cayó en Rusia - FayerWayer | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
Conversamos con el astrónomo Álvaro Orsi para responder algunas dudas sobre la roca que estalló el viernes sobre territorio ruso.

Via Ursula Sola de Hinestrosa
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500 Million-Year-Old Fossilized Embryos Found

500 Million-Year-Old Fossilized Embryos Found | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered rare, fossilized embryos that may provide valuable insight into a time of rapid expansion and diversification among the world's first organisms, according to a release from the school.

 

Known as the "Cambrian explosion," most of the world's marine 

invertebrates first appeared in the fossil record during this period. While much of the record is comprised of skeletal structures - which may or may not give researchers an accurate picture of prehistoric organisms - the University of Missouri find includes previously undiscovered soft-tissue fossils, which could help with future interpretations of evolutionary history.

 

"Before the Ediacaran and Cambrian Periods, organisms were unicellular and simple," said James Schiffbauer, assistant professorof geological sciences at the University of Missouri. "The Cambrian Period, which occurred between 540 million and 485 million years ago, ushered in the advent of shells."

 

He said the shells and exoskeletons become fossilized over time, giving scientists clues into how organisms existed millions of years ago. He added that the development of shells provided "protection and structural integrity for organisms."

 

Schiffbauer's work focuses on harder-to-find, soft-tissue organisms that were not preserved as well and, thus, are less plentiful. His team, which includes Missouri University doctoral student Jesse Broce, now is studying fossilized embryos in rocks that provide rare opportunities to study the origins and developmental biology of early animals during the Cambrian explosion.

 

Broce collected fossils from the lower Cambrian Shuijingtuo Formation in the Hubei Province in southern China and analyzed samples to determine the chemical makeup of the rocks. Soft tissue fossils have different chemical patterns than harder, skeletal remains, allowing researchers to identify the processes that contributed to their preservation.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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It's bigger on the inside: Tardis regions in spacetime and the expanding universe

It's bigger on the inside: Tardis regions in spacetime and the expanding universe | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it

Fans of Doctor Who will be very familiar with the stupefied phrase uttered by all new visitors to his Tardis: "It's...bigger...on the inside." As it turns out, this apparently irrational idea may have something to contribute to our understanding of the universe. A team of cosmologists in Finland and Poland propose that the observed acceleration of the expansion of the universe, usually explained by dark energy or modified laws of gravity, may actually be the result of regions of spacetime that are larger on the inside than they appear from the outside. The researchers have dubbed these "Tardis regions."

 

Perhaps the most surprising cosmological observation of the past few decades was the 1998 discovery by Perlmutter, Schmidt and Riess, that the expansion of the universe has been accelerating for the past five billion years. This result, which won the 2011 Nobel Prize, was quickly corroborated by observation of independent phenomena such as the cosmic background radiation.

 

Why the acceleration is occurring is not currently understood, although it can be described. In terms of conventional cosmological theory, it calls for the existence of a "dark energy," an energy field permeating the universe. However, because gravity attracts normal mass-energy, dark energy would have to have a negative energy density, something unknown as yet in nature. In addition, roughly 75 percent of the contents of the universe have to be made up of dark energy to get the observed acceleration of expansion. Even though dark energy provides a reasonable description of the universal acceleration, its value as an explanation is still controversial. Many have the gut reaction that dark energy is too strange to be true.

 

Professors Rasanen, and Szybkab, of the University of Helsinki and the Jagellonian University at Krakow, together with Rasanen's graduate student Mikko Lavinto, decided to investigate another possibility.

 

The "standard cosmological model," which is the framework within which accelerated expansion requires dark energy, was developed in the 1920s and 1930s. The FLRW metric (named for Friedmann, Lemaître, Robertson and Walker, the major contributors) is an exact solution to Einstein's equations. It describes a strictly homogeneous, isotropic universe that can be expanding or contracting.

 

Strict homogeneity and strict isotropy means that the universe described by an FLRW metric looks the same at a given time from every point in space, at whatever distance or orientation you look. This is a universe in which galaxies, clusters of galaxies, sheets, walls, filaments, and voids do not exist. Not, then, very much like our own Universe, which appears to be rather homogeneous and isotropic when you look at distances greater than about a gigaparsec, but closer in it is nothing of the sort.

Rasanen's research team decided to examine a model universe having a structure closer to ours, in an attempt to look for alternate explanations of the accelerating expansion we see. They took an FLRW metric filled with a uniform density of dust, and converted it into a Swiss cheese model but cutting random holes in it. This has the effect of making the model inhomogeneous and non-isotropic (except very far away), and hence the Swiss cheese model looks more like our own Universe, save for the fact that our Universe does not seem to be full of holes.

 

While Swiss cheese is delicious, a universe with holes is not. To rectify this, Rasanen's team filled in the holes with plugs made from dust-filled exact solutions of Einstein's equation. These plugs are a reasonable model of the region near a sizable body, such as a galaxy. By putting the plugs in the holes, and then smoothing the intersections between them, they obtained a rather uniform spacetime with a lot of smaller blobs of matter dispersed throughout it – a (very) simple analog to the structure of the universe in which we live.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Astronomía de campo: Efemérides astronómicas de agosto 2013

Astronomía de campo: Efemérides astronómicas de agosto 2013 | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
Juan Carlos Cañadilla's insight:

Actualización del blog Astronomía de campo: efemérides agosto 2013. 

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Astronomía de campo: Espectaculares vídeos: Saturno y agujeros negros.

Astronomía de campo: Espectaculares vídeos: Saturno y agujeros negros. | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
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Actualización del blog Astronomía de campo.  / Dos vídeos muy buenos sobre Saturno y los agujeros negros.

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Astronomía de campo: Efemérides astronómicas de julio 2013

Astronomía de campo: Efemérides astronómicas de julio 2013 | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
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Actualización del blog Astronomía de campo / Efemérides astronómicas de julio 2013.

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Scale of Universe - Interactive Scale of the Universe Tool

Scale of Universe - Interactive Scale of the Universe Tool | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
Scale of Universe - Interactive Scale of the Universe Tool -

Via Sergio Poppi
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Astronomía de campo: Manual de fotografía nocturna y atmosférica

Astronomía de campo: Manual de fotografía nocturna y atmosférica | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
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Actualización del blog Astronomía de campo. Manual de fotografía nocturna y atmosférica.

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Astronomía de campo: Júpiter Venus y Mercurio alineados en los cielos de mayo.

Astronomía de campo: Júpiter Venus y Mercurio alineados en los cielos de mayo. | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
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Actualización del blog Astronomía de campo / Júpiter Venus y Mercurio alineados en los cielos de mayo.Actualización del blog Astronomía de campo / Júpiter Venus y Mercurio alineados en los cielos de mayo.

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Amesome infographic on the 100+ exoplanets discovered to date

Amesome infographic on the 100+ exoplanets discovered to date | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
NASA’s Kepler mission has discovered more than 100 confirmed planets orbiting distant stars.

Via Guillaume Decugis
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, April 25, 2013 1:10 PM

Watch them orbit on scale and sort them by size: great job by the nytimes! 

Gust MEES's curator insight, April 27, 2013 7:37 AM

 

Nice interactive infographic, check it out an learn more...

 

John Purificati's comment, May 7, 2013 1:49 PM
Interesting stuff.
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Astronomía de campo: Efemérides astronómicas mayo 2013.

Astronomía de campo: Efemérides astronómicas mayo 2013. | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
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Actualización del blog: Astronomía de campo / Efemérides astronómicas mayo 2013, hemisferio norte.

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Actualización del blog: Astronomía de campo.

Actualización del blog: Astronomía de campo. | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
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 Para los que empiezan y los que disfrutan del cielo nocturno.
¿Eres de los que le gusta disfrutar del cielo nocturno, en el campo o la ciudad?, entonces este es tu blog!, fundamentalmente práctico.
Hoy, todo lo necesario para comenzar.

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Astronomía de campo: Efemérides marzo y otro gran "timelapse"

Astronomía de campo: Efemérides marzo y otro gran "timelapse" | Astronomía de campo | Scoop.it
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Astronomía de campo: Efemérides marzo y otro gran "timelapse"

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