Astronomy Education
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Space Telescopes Look Back 13.2 Billion Years and See ...

Space Telescopes Look Back 13.2 Billion Years and See ... | Astronomy Education | Scoop.it
What was the Universe like more than 13 billion years ago, just 500 million years after the big bang? New data from the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes reveal some surprisingly bright galaxies that are about 10 to 20 ...
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Because the Universe is only as old as the space that light has traveled since it was created, Hubble was able to take images of the first things existing in the Universe. Literally this is a picture of 13.2 billion years ago! It's like time travel in a photo!

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“Nearby” Supernova Has Astronomers Going Gaga - National Geographic

“Nearby” Supernova Has Astronomers Going Gaga - National Geographic | Astronomy Education | Scoop.it
National Geographic
“Nearby” Supernova Has Astronomers Going Gaga
National Geographic
Something has lit up the Cigar Galaxy, astronomers report, and it looks like an exploding star.
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Falsely coloured image of an exploding star in the Cigar Galaxy

Also known as Messier 82, the Cigar Galaxy is 12 million light years away. The starburst activity was supposedly triggered by the interaction with a nearby galaxy, causing a class Ia supernova. Galaxy interaction is not often caught on film.

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Scientists directly image brown dwarf for the first time at Keck ...

Scientists directly image brown dwarf for the first time at Keck ... | Astronomy Education | Scoop.it
Precise radial velocity measurements were obtained using the HIRES instrument installed on Keck Observatory's 10-meter, Keck I telescope. The observations, which span 17 years starting from 1996, show a long-term ...
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The Keck 1 telescope is located on the summit of Mauna Kea on the main island of Hawaii. The High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) breaks up incoming light into its component colors to measure the precise intensity of each of thousands of color channels. It's even been used to find direct evidence of the Big Bang Theory. 

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