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Best content in Astronomy | Diigo - Groups

Best content in Astronomy | Diigo - Groups | Astronomy | Scoop.it
Share links to astronomy and astrophysics resources, stories, and other ephemera.
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The Universe - Biggest Blasts - History Channel

In the beginning, there was darkness, and then, bang—giving birth to an endless, expanding existence of time, space and matter. Now, see further than we've e...
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Free-Floating Planets May be Born Free

Free-Floating Planets May be Born Free | Astronomy | Scoop.it
  Tiny, round, cold clouds in space have all the right characteristics to form planets with no parent star. New observations, made with Chalmers University of Technology telescopes, show that ...
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Voyager 1 has left the solar system

Voyager 1 has left the solar system | Astronomy | Scoop.it
Voyager 1 appears to have at long last left our solar system and entered interstellar space, says a University of Maryland-led team of researchers.
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IAU Revises Their Stance on Public Involvement in Naming of Exoplanets and Moons

IAU Revises Their Stance on Public Involvement in Naming of Exoplanets and Moons | Astronomy | Scoop.it
The International Astronomical Union issued a statement on August 14, 2013 that they have changed their official stance on two things: 1. assigning popular
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What If Other Planets Were at Same Distance as the Moon

What If Other Planets Were at Same Distance as the Moon | Astronomy | Scoop.it
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usYC_Z36rHw&rel=0 This is a visualization of what it might be like if the Moon was replaced with some of the other planets at the same distance as our moon In ord...
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The Young Universe - Wild Neutrinos And Our First Hundred Thousand Years

The Young Universe - Wild Neutrinos And Our First Hundred Thousand Years | Astronomy | Scoop.it
Detectives of both the amateur and occupational variety know that the best way to solve a mystery is to visit the scene where it began and look for clues. Cosmological detectives do that too, by trying to peer as far back to the Big Bang as possible.
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Nine (Eight) Planets and Counting

Nine (Eight) Planets and Counting | Astronomy | Scoop.it
Nine (Eight) Planets and Counting, the fulldome show. Explore the variety of objects that populate our solar system. For planetariums and digital dome theaters.
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Astronomers marvel at the skies above

Astronomers marvel at the skies above | Astronomy | Scoop.it
FRANCE - Star gazers across France will turn their eyes to the heavens this weekend for the 23rd Nights of the Stars, the country's annual celebration of astronomy
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Ancient Astronomical Calendar Discovered in Scotland Predates Stonehenge by 6,000 Years

Ancient Astronomical Calendar Discovered in Scotland Predates Stonehenge by 6,000 Years | Astronomy | Scoop.it
A team from the University of Birmingham recently announced an astronomical discovery in Scotland marking the beginnings of recorded time. Announced last
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First hundred thousand years of our universe | Science Codex

First hundred thousand years of our universe | Science Codex | Astronomy | Scoop.it
Mystery fans know that the best way to solve a mystery is to revisit the scene where it began and look for clues. To understand the mysteries of our universe, scientists are trying to go back as far they can to the Big Bang.
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So.... Your Still Interested In Astronomy?

So.... Your Still Interested In Astronomy? | Astronomy | Scoop.it
If you remember, last time we took a look at 10 things you might want to know about our Solar System. Not only did we found out some amazing stuff, but we also discovered a few facts about Pluto.
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Free-floating planets may be born free; 200 billion starless planets roam Milky Way

Free-floating planets may be born free; 200 billion starless planets roam Milky Way | Astronomy | Scoop.it
In previous research endeavors, astronomers calculated that as many as 200 billion free-floating planets exist in the Milky Way galaxy.
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The Detailed Universe: This will Blow Your Mind.

From nano-metres to billions of light years. ★Subscribers: Please wait untill processed to HD★ President of PureEducation: User/GenuineBolino
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Rare 16th Century Astronomical Device Returned After Years Spent Missing

Rare 16th Century Astronomical Device Returned After Years Spent Missing | Astronomy | Scoop.it
After more than a decade of spent missing, a rare 16th century device called an astrolabe is being returned to the Swedish museum it was stolen from.
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"We can Now Listen to Black Holes Forming Throughout the Universe"

"We can Now Listen to Black Holes Forming Throughout the Universe" | Astronomy | Scoop.it
New technology that breaks the quantum measurement barrier has been developed to detect the gravity waves first predicted by Einstein in 1916, says David Blair is a Winthrop Professor of Physics at The University of Western Australia and Director...
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Observable universe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In Big Bang cosmology, the observable universe consists of the galaxies and other matter that can, in principle, be observed from Earth in the present day—because light (or other signals) from those objects has had time to reach the Earth since the beginning of the cosmological expansion. Assuming the universe is isotropic, the distance to the edge of the observable universe is roughly the same in every direction. That is, the observable universe is a spherical volume (a ball) centered on the observer, regardless of the shape of the universe as a whole. Every location in the universe has its own observable universe, which may or may not overlap with the one centered on Earth.

The word observable used in this sense does not depend on whether modern technology actually permits detection of radiation from an object in this region (or indeed on whether there is any radiation to detect). It simply indicates that it is possible in principle for light or other signals from the object to reach an observer on Earth. In practice, we can see light only from as far back as the time of photon decoupling in the recombination epoch. That is when particles were first able to emit photons that were not quickly re-absorbed by other particles. Before then, the universe was filled with a plasma that was opaque to photons.

The surface of last scattering is the collection of points in space at the exact distance that photons from the time of photon decoupling just reach us today. These are the photons we detect today as cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). However, it may be possible in the future to observe the still older neutrino background, or even more distant events via gravitational waves (which also should move at the speed of light). Sometimes astrophysicists distinguish between the visible universe, which includes only signals emitted since recombination—and the observable universe, which includes signals since the beginning of the cosmological expansion (the Big Bang in traditional cosmology, the end of the inflationary epoch in modern cosmology). According to calculations, the comoving distance (current proper distance) to particles from the CMBR, which represent the radius of the visible universe, is about 14.0 billion parsecs (about 45.7 billion light years), while the comoving distance to the edge of the observable universe is about 14.3 billion parsecs (about 46.6 billion light years),[1] about 2% larger.

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Bright New Nova In Delphinus — You can See it Tonight With Binoculars

Bright New Nova In Delphinus — You can See it Tonight With Binoculars | Astronomy | Scoop.it
Looking around for something new to see in your binoculars or telescope tonight? How about an object whose name literally means "new". Japanese amateur astr
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Astronomers Discover First Ever Six-Image Lensed Quasar | Astronomy | Sci-News.com

Astronomers Discover First Ever Six-Image Lensed Quasar | Astronomy | Sci-News.com | Astronomy | Scoop.it
A team of scientists at Niels Bohr Institute has reported the discovery of a six-image lensed quasar named SDSSJ 2222 + 2745.
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Is the Higgs Boson the Source of Dark Energy? New Theory Says "Yes"

Is the Higgs Boson the Source of Dark Energy? New Theory Says "Yes" | Astronomy | Scoop.it
One of the biggest mysteries in contemporary particle physics and cosmology is why dark energy, which is observed to dominate energy density of the universe, has a remarkably small (but not zero) value.
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Astronomers Discover a Pink Planet Around a Sun-like Star

Astronomers Discover a Pink Planet Around a Sun-like Star | Astronomy | Scoop.it
You’re looking at an artist’s conception of GJ 504b, the lowest-mass planet ever detected around a star using direct imaging techniques. Located 57 light-years away, it’s about four times the mass of Jupiter.
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First hundred thousand years of our universe

First hundred thousand years of our universe | Astronomy | Scoop.it
Mystery fans know that the best way to solve a mystery is to revisit the scene where it began and look for clues. To understand the mysteries of our universe, scientists are trying to go back as far they can to the Big Bang.
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08/07/2013 - Ephemeris - Where are the bright planets this week?

08/07/2013 - Ephemeris - Where are the bright planets this week? | Astronomy | Scoop.it
Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 7th.  The sun rises at 6:36.  It'll be up for 14 hours and 23 minutes, setting at 8:59.   The moon, 1 day past new, will set at 9:00 this evening. Lets check out the...
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