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Harvard: Honoring Henrietta Swan Leavitt

Harvard: Honoring Henrietta Swan Leavitt | Astronomy | Scoop.it
StarWrite is a science editing company dedicated to emphasizing the story in science writing.
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The Scale of the Universe 2

Zoom from the edge of the universe to the quantum foam of spacetime and learn about everything in between.
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Star Wheel - Astronomy In Your Hands

Star Wheel - Astronomy In Your Hands | Astronomy | Scoop.it
Astronomy In your Hands: putting the sky within your reach. Star Wheel.
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Henrietta Swan Leavitt - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Henrietta Swan Leavitt (July 4, 1868 – December 12, 1921) was an American astronomer. A graduate of Radcliffe College, in 1893 Leavitt started working at the Harvard College Observatory as a "computer," examining photographic plates in order to measure and catalog the brightness of stars. Leavitt discovered the relation between the luminosity and the period of Cepheid variable stars. Though she received little recognition in her lifetime, it was her discovery that first allowed astronomers to measure the distance between the Earth and faraway galaxies. After Leavitt's death, Edwin Hubble used the luminosity-period relation for Cepheids to determine that the universe is expanding (see Hubble's law).

Henrietta Swan Leavitt, the daughter of Congregational church minister George Roswell Leavitt[1] and his wife Henrietta Swan (Kendrick), was born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, a descendant of Deacon John Leavitt, an English Puritan tailor, who settled in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in the early seventeenth century.[2] (The family name was spelled Levett in early Massachusetts records.) She attended Oberlin College, and graduated from Radcliffe College, then called the Society for the Collegiate Instruction for Women, with a bachelor's degree in 1892. It wasn't until her fourth year of college that Leavitt took a course in astronomy, in which she earned an A–.[3]:27

In 1893, Leavitt began working at the Harvard College Observatory as one of the women human "computers" hired by Edward Charles Pickering to measure and catalog the brightness of stars as they appeared in the observatory's photographic plate collection. (In the early 1900s, women were not allowed to operate telescopes).[4] Because Leavitt had independent means, Pickering initially did not have to pay her. Later, she received $0.30 an hour for her work.[3]:32

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Powers of Ten. Based on the film by Charles and Ray Eames. An Eames Office Website

Powers of Ten. Based on the film by Charles and Ray Eames. An Eames Office Website | Astronomy | Scoop.it
Powers of Ten, Powers of 10, Charles and Ray Eames, Los Angeles, California
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