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Assistant Principal
Leadership concepts for Assistant Principals, other school leaders, and those interested in leading others. Follow me on twitter @APInsight
Curated by Nancy J. Herr
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5 Ways Leaders Start Movements

5 Ways Leaders Start Movements | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
Learn how leaders start movements in these 5 simple steps, demonstrated perfectly in this 3-minute video.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Cheryl Frose, Lynnette Van Dyke, Dean J. Fusto
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 11, 7:57 AM

(From the article): With the power of social media, it’s easy for leaders to shine a light on the movement. Remember the Ice Bucket Challenge? Who started it? No one remembers, but that person is a true leader. Once you have a movement, share it with colleagues, friends, family and with the world. Remember, as Sivers explains, when the movement begins, others will join willingly, because most people will fear being left alone, if they fail to join the crowd. Again, consider the Ice Bucket Challenge. You had to join or risk being left out of one of the most powerful movements to come along in many years.

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, June 28, 5:21 PM
Leaders take risks and innovate--be brave!
Luc E. Morisset's curator insight, July 3, 9:07 AM

As simple as that...

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Principals: Best Investment of 5 Big Ideas to Improve Education | Forbes

Principals: Best Investment of 5 Big Ideas to Improve Education | Forbes | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
Forbes challenged experts to single out five big ideas that could Make U.S. school kids
tops in the world. Then we quantified The costs and
benefits. Behold: an ROI-driven
turnaround plan for our children (With a $225 Trillion Dividend).

Via Mel Riddile
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

Mel Riddile's insight:

"FORBES sought to spur debate by quantifying the seemingly unquantifiable. We set out to determine the costs and benefits of taking U.S. schoolkids from their middling global rankings to top five in the world, as measured by math scores and rates for high school graduation, college entry and four-year college completion."


Enhanced School Leadership was, by far, the lowest investment, but had the highest rate of return.


In other words, if funds are limited, spend them on principals.


Of the five proposals, School Leadership was, by far, the best investment to make in improving schools.

  1. Teacher Efficacy/Salaries - Cost-$4.8 Trillion ROI - 12X
  2. Universal Pre-K - Cost $1.1 Trillion ROI - 34X
  3. School Leadership - Cost $11Billion ROI - 5,551X
  4. Blended Learning - Cost $43 Billions ROI - 746X
  5. Common Core Standards - Cost $185 Billion  ROI - 149X
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, December 10, 2014 10:24 AM

"FORBES sought to spur debate by quantifying the seemingly unquantifiable. We set out to determine the costs and benefits of taking U.S. schoolkids from their middling global rankings to top five in the world, as measured by math scores and rates for high school graduation, college entry and four-year college completion."


Enhanced School Leadership was, by far, the lowest investment, but had the highest rate of return.


In other words, if funds are limited, spend them on principals.


Of the five proposals, School Leadership was, by far, the best investment to make in improving schools.

  1. Teacher Efficacy/Salaries - Cost-$4.8 Trillion ROI - 12X
  2. Universal Pre-K - Cost $1.1 Trillion ROI - 34X
  3. School Leadership - Cost $11Billion ROI - 5,551X
  4. Blended Learning - Cost $43 Billions ROI - 746X
  5. Common Core Standards - Cost $185 Billion  ROI - 149X
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A Leadership Rule Every Boss Should Know

Great leaders are role models for building strong relationships. This rule of thumb makes relationship-based leadership easy.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

We all know that we should model the behavior we want to see. This article provides a scientific basis for why we should do this.

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Edward Pierce's curator insight, November 17, 2014 10:38 AM

my monday morning moment

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, November 17, 2014 1:00 PM

It is interesting and good to see Gottman's research and work making its way to a broader audience. Relationships are at the core of working with people. We need to do more than pay lip service to this point.

 

@ivon_ehd1

DailyEnglish's curator insight, November 18, 2014 4:40 AM

Donnez l'exemple

Sally Cornan

www.dailyenglish.fr

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A Leadership Secret For Today’s Distracted Leader

A Leadership Secret For Today’s Distracted Leader | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
When you’re in the room, be in the room. Here's why it is so important to be absolutely authentic in everything you say and do.

Via Anne Leong
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

Excellent article for leaders in all fields. Like being a good listener, being in the room means you are honoring the people in your life. It helps both professional and personal relationships.

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Are you a leadership lightweight?

Are you a leadership lightweight? | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it

A "Lightweight", the Merriam-Webster Dictionary tells us, is "one of little consequence or ability". Thankfully, it’s quite uncommon for a leader or manager to be a lightweight in every aspect of their job. But none of us are perfect: all of us have blinds spots and areas where we need to raise the bar (sometimes a long way) to improve the quality and effectiveness of our work.

The first step in setting out to address these areas and becoming more relevant is to know what you don't know. So here are five common pitfalls that can keep you stuck in the lightweight division.

1. Blaming others for a lack of results
It's annoying, frustrating yet surprisingly common to hear leaders or managers complaining about and blaming external forces for their inability to deliver results. It might be the economy, the government, the weather, the competition, the time of year, the inventory, the shareholders or their boss, but it is invariably an excuse.
Assuming the role of victim or martyr is a convenient way to take the focus off your own failures, inefficiencies, lack of success and lack of strength and/or courage to step up.

The Antidote: Your internal decisions are what determine your success and effectiveness, not external forces. Better to look at one's face in the mirror than stare out a window. In reality, you can control about 80 per cent of what gets in your way and decide whether and how you will react and respond to it. So focus on the things you can control rather than the minority of factors that you aren’t able to influence.

You can control things like your attitude, work ethic, how and where you spend your time, effort and energy, and with whom you spend it. Equally, whether you approach and carry out everyday tasks honestly and responsibly is entirely up to you.

Until a leader or manager has mastered these aspects of their job (and their self) and moved out of the quicksand of martyrdom and victimhood, excuses (not reasons) will remain part of their DNA as lightweights.

2. Being reluctant to hold others accountable
Another thing you can control as a leader or manager is accountability - the key to creating the (healthy) pressure, energy or tension to perform the tasks required to sustain organizational culture and produce results.
The Antidote: One of the most fundamental tasks of any manager is having the courage and strength to set clear expectations and make sure they're stretching their employees (and themselves). Without clear expectations, holding people accountable for results is an impossible and often unpleasant experience for everyone involved.

It’s also important that there are consequences if established behavior and performance standards are not met. If there are no consequences for failing to meet defined goals and targets, you are simply perpetuating deficient behavior.

3. Making easy, popular, convenient (and wrong) decisions
Some managers would prefer to derailing their team or their entire organization rather than take difficult decisions that will prove unpopular or rock the boat. That can be a fatal weakness. If a leader or managers lacks the fortitude and the psycho/emotional strength to make hard choices, it may serve them, and others, well to consider moving out of their current position and explore opportunities that are more in sync with their skills and capacities.
The Antidote: Quality and excellence do not come as a result of making decisions because they're easy, popular or convenient. Excellence only comes about as a result of decisions being taken that are right, irrespective of whether they are costly, difficult, uncomfortable or inconvenient.

The more uncomfortable a decision feels and the more discomfort a leader or manager experiences in making a choice, the more likely and probable the potential is for actualization of growth. Spending valuable time hiding in denial or searching for ways to avoid the discomfort or pain of change is a lose-lose situation. Neither the individual nor the team or organization will experience real growth.

4. Being too self-reliant
No one is indispensable to their organization - no one! Relax, you may be good, but, you’re not that good! As General de Gaulle observed, "The graveyard is filled with indispensable men.” And I might add, "Remember the window-washer (on the high-rise building) who stepped back to admire his handiwork." Disaster.
The Antidote: The single biggest obstacle to building a healthy team or organization is ego. Few things will undermine a leader more quickly or more comprehensively. Managers with an inflated sense of their own importance often unknowingly or unconsciously perpetuate a cycle of psychopaths and sycophants. They create fear, stifle engagement, undermine morale and encourage the best and the brightest to lose interest and, worst of all, leave.

An effective leader is one who empowers others. They find ways to make their people less, not more, dependent on them. In fact, the greatest measure of a leader or manager's supervision is not how people perform while they're micro-managing their work, but how well folks perform when they're not around.

5. Keeping the wrong people for too long
Every manager will, from time to time, find themselves confronted by someone who is either so unsuited to their job or so incompetent that even if they do improve to a degree, they'll never reach the level of performance required from them.
It’s no good trying to make allowances in this situation or to try to make that employee not good, better or best, but just "not bad". Excellence can’t be achieved by mediocrity, by a group of people who are "not bad".

The Antidote: It’s a sad fact that if you continue to invest energy and resources in below-average individuals and see no real upturn in their performance, you're wasting your time. The situation isn’t just unhealthy for the manager, but it is giving the incompetent employee a false sense of security, hope and stability. You may also be robbing your high-potential people of the support and attention they need to move from already-good to ‘great’.

In these circumstances, you need to find a way to honestly, yet compassionately, cut your losses and redirect your resources to your current and potential solid performers.

Questions to Get you Started
While there are certainly more genes in the DNA of lightweight leaders, these five questions are a good starting point.
What outside conditions are you prone to blame for your organization or team's lack of results?
Whose behavior must you put into check with an effective coaching conversation (with consequences attached) to turn around poor performance? What are you waiting for to initiate this conversation? Do you need to have this conversation with yourself?
Which of your people have you made less dependent on you by broadening their latitude and discretion?
What more can you do to make people more capable while you free yourself up to spend more time on high-leverage tasks?
Do you have a "project" on your team who continues to hover at a below-average performance level with no sign of an upward trend? How much more time and money will you invest in this rescue mission? And why?
There is no crime in discovering or admitting that you’re a lightweight. The crime is the reluctance to do the work needed to move up into an altogether heavier class.


Via Linda Holroyd
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

What is valuable here is that the author not only identifies roadblocks to leadership success, but provides the "antidote" to each faux pas.

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Linda Holroyd's curator insight, October 20, 2014 6:36 PM

Have the courage to evaluate for yourself if you're a lightweight and the strength to do something about it, if you choose to.

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Should Strong Leaders Also Be Great Teachers?

Should Strong Leaders Also Be Great Teachers? | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
Jack Welch once said: "As a leader, you have to have a teachable point of view." How teaching separates great leaders from good ones.

Via Bobby Dillard, Dean J. Fusto
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Leadership Starts With You

Leadership Starts With You | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
Most leadership failure is the result of poor self-leadership. Leading yourself - personal leadership - is the most important tasks of any leader. It’s the most important set of practices a leader can develop.

Via Stefano Principato, Dean J. Fusto
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

The old adage "be true to yourself" lives on. We need to develop personal practices that enhance our skill to lead others.

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Kryptonite: The Thing That Weakens Leadership

Kryptonite: The Thing That Weakens Leadership | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it

"Kryptonite is mythical material from Krypton that drains Superman of his superpowers. Kryptonite of leadership: The belief that self-evaluation trumps the evaluation of those directly impacted by your leadership weakens your effectiveness. What you think of your leadership isn’t as important as what others think."


Via Allan Shaw, Dean J. Fusto
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

It is vital to get feedback from those you lead if you want a true assessment. Just because you are working hard and putting in a lot of time doesn't mean you are being effective. 

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Allan Shaw's curator insight, August 21, 2014 6:07 PM

John Hattie's analyses of research into learning effects also shows that feedback is one of the greatest contributors to improvement. As in teaching and learning, so in leadership. Work to give quality feedback but more importantly, work even harder to receive quality feedback.

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Leaders Can Change the Mood and Raise Morale

Leaders Can Change the Mood and Raise Morale | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
Holding the balance between the things that need to be done and the attitude with which they are accomplished is our work. Leaders are the models. And while we cannot control the things that come at us, we do have control over how we feel and react.

Via Gordon Dahlby
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

Excellent article about how you can affect  teachers and students from day 1. 

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The Best Way to Get More Out of Your Employees

The Best Way to Get More Out of Your Employees | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
When people feel better, they perform better. In fact, a recent HBR survey of more than 19,000 people at all organizational levels revealed that meeting four basic employee needs -- renewal (physic...
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

 A short article that reminds us that knowing your staff personally and responding to their needs can improve both work conditions and engagement. 

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4 Things You Thought Were True About Time Management

4 Things You Thought Were True About Time Management | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
First, it’s not really about time.
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

The hectic first days of school will soon be upon us.  It is much better to start off with a plan. These tips regarding getting work done in the time you have will be helpful. 

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4 Characteristics Of Learning Leaders

4 Characteristics Of Learning Leaders | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
4 Characteristics Of Learning Leaders

Via Skip Zalneraitis, Suvi Salo, Bobby Dillard, Dean J. Fusto
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 7, 2014 10:25 AM

Peter Vaill suggested learning and leading are intertwined. Teaching is about learning and leading being intertwined with it.

Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, July 7, 2014 1:26 PM

I love this analysis of a learning leader! It is spot on.  ~ V.B.

 

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8 Characteristics of Great School Leaders

8 Characteristics of Great School Leaders | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it

Via Gino Bondi, Dean J. Fusto
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

Some ideas to  be a well rounded leader who is both visionary and well grounded. 

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8 Signs Someone is Not Fit for Leadership

8 Signs Someone is Not Fit for Leadership | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it

Leaders are not leaders because of their title, their salary or their accomplishments. They are leaders because they bring out the hidden greatness in others. The world is full of wannabe leaders and people are often put in leadership roles who really don't want to or aren't capable of leading.

Here are 8 signs someone is not fit for leadership. When these signs are present, don’t follow blindly, don’t adopt them yourself and start looking for a new leader.

  1. Blame outwardly – It is never their fault. They blame the tool, the process or the people. They share the blame and hoard the fame.
  2. Passion is missing – When passion is absent the whole team knows it and usually will follow suit. If the leader can’t stay passionate about the vision, the team can’t help them achieve it.
  3. Flat out can’t listen – They either think they are always right, their idea or opinion is the only one that matters or everyone around them is incompetent, out to get them or just plain wrong.
  4. Sees their team as there to serve them – This makes them a master not a leader. They beat the team into submission instead of influencing them to follow.
  5. Compromise their personal values and belief system – Even when the decision doesn’t feel right inside they do it anyway. Overtime you find that their values have vanished or transformed into something evil.
  6. Uncooperative – They keep a perpetual line in the sand. The art of compromise and negotiation is lost on them.
  7. Uncoachable – They have no performance issues and no room for improvement. They remind you that they've been doing this for X years and know what is best and right.
  8. Threatened by those around them – They go throughout their day with fear that someone is smarter or better than they are and they work hard to ruin other peoples credibility.

These traits completely miss the point of leadership. Beyond the fact that they are making everyone around them miserable and costing the company time, money and resources or worse they might be training future leaders to behave this way. Do you lead someone who shows these signs? Ask for their resignation to prevent any further damage to your organization.

 


Via Linda Holroyd
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

This article can help you decide if someone on your staff is ready for leadership responsibilities. It can also help you mentor someone aspiring to leadership. You might even find something that is stopping you from being the best leaders you can be.

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Linda Holroyd's curator insight, February 2, 11:19 AM

How do the leaders you follow fit into the criteria above? And how would you fare yourself?

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Strong leadership goes beyond the merely cosmetic - The National

Strong leadership goes beyond the merely cosmetic - The National | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
We all have the potential to be a leader whether it's setting up a innovative new company, taking charge in the workplace or introducing social change that benefits our community.
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

"Be the change."  A hallmark of real leadership is that behind the passion and energy, the leader walks the walk.

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15 Magic Things Great Leaders Say Every Day

According to author Frank Sonnenberg, character matters. Reveal your true character through the words you say to your employees.
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

Born in humility , these phrases should become part of you leadership dynamic. 

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18 Things Great Principals Do Differently

18 Things Great Principals Do Differently | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it

Via Grant Montgomery, Dean J. Fusto
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

Nice info graphic

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Lead By Example Others Will Follow

Lead By Example Others Will Follow | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
When you lead by example, you create a vision of what is possible for others. They can look lead by example, too, once you show them how it’s done.

Via Anne Leong, Dean J. Fusto
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

Always a winner. Practicing what we preach is a way to develop others and allows us to experience personally the challenges of what we want to see done.

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What Effective Principals Do

What Effective Principals Do | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
What Effective Principals Do

Via Grant Montgomery, Dean J. Fusto
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Help! My Principal Says He's An Instructional Leader!

Help! My Principal Says He's An Instructional Leader! | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
When a school leader announces they are an instructional leader, what does that mean...and should teachers hide as quickly as possible?

Via Mel Riddile
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, August 24, 2014 12:33 PM

"It's easy to get caught up in the numbers. Principals, new or old, read the effect size literature and note that instructional leadership can have an impact on student growth, so they begin walking into classrooms all the time. Without the proper mindset, knowledge of instruction, and prep work done with staff; leaders are in jeopardy of using the right term (instructional leadership) while doing it the wrong way.

And teachers and students are the ones on the receiving end of the out of control swinging pendulum."

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7 Massive Mistakes New Managers Make and How to Avoid Them

7 Massive Mistakes New Managers Make and How to Avoid Them | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
You have just been promoted…. Congratulations! While this is an exciting time for you, have you stopped to consider the mistakes new managers make...
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

Some great tips for anyone new to a leadership role. These ideas consist mainly of getting to know those around you before charging ahead. Remember, even if you worked in the same building before, you are now the new kid on the block. 

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Six Limits Leaders Need to Challenge

Six Limits Leaders Need to Challenge | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
We all have limits – the boundaries beyond which we just don’t go. After all, it wouldn’t be safe. It wouldn’t be prudent. It wouldn’t be easy. We set limits for safety purposes, for logical purpos...

Via Anne Leong, Dean J. Fusto
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

Challenge yourself beyond what you think is safe. Creativity, insight, and the best solution may surface. 

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Authentic Leadership

Authentic Leadership | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
Authentic leadership is much more than competent management. Managers who attain the level of authentic leadership are those who are the vision holders for the organization. They possess five key qualities that guide them in the workplace: 1.
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Why New Leaders Fail

Why New Leaders Fail | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
Many organizations that promote star performers to leadership positions find that these leaders fail if they lack emotional and social intelligence. Transitioning from team member to leader requires keen awareness of our individual mental states and the mental states of others.

Via Grant Montgomery
Nancy J. Herr's insight:

Becoming a leader for the first time is daunting. We need to change perspective yet not forget where we came from to be a success.

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Join the League of Extraordinary Bosses: 4 Habits to Cultivate

Join the League of Extraordinary Bosses: 4 Habits to Cultivate | Assistant Principal | Scoop.it
The most effective managers value transparency, practice two-way communication, provide constructive feedback and go above and beyond to serve their employees.

Via Anne Leong, Bobby Dillard, Dean J. Fusto
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Michael Binzer's curator insight, July 5, 2014 7:17 AM

I believe in this - transparency, openness, no hidden agendas and first and foremost to serve my COLLEAGUES.

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, July 5, 2014 9:22 AM

Bosses or managers who don't respect those rules are into power tripping. They don't last long in this ever changing business environment. If they do, they take the company down with them.